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22

It's no big deal, just that the most common standard handwritten form of the character is different from the most common printed form of the character. This doesn't even rise to the level of "variant character" in the strictest sense (like 悪 vs 惡). The two are the same character, just like a joined-up printed さ is the same as a disjoint handwritten one, or a ...


15

It's a famous book called ぎやどぺかどる, a translation of Guía de Pecadores (or "The Sinner's Guide") by Jesuit mission in Japan. It reads: きやとへかとる 巻の二 (voicing marks unused) Guia do Pecador - Book 2 (title in Medieval Portuguese) What makes it hard to read is hentaigana, now obsolete historic alternate kana, used in the line as: きや登遍可と類 (hentaigana ...


12

The rule you mentioned does not apply to 原稿用紙 for novels and articles. Never. However, you may be instructed to place 濁点(゛) and 半濁点(゜)into a separate box, when you have to fill some legacy paper forms at banks or government offices. This is because 濁点 and 半濁点 consume an extra byte if you encode hankaku katakana strings into old encodings such as JIS, ...


12

It looks to me like [舞]{まい} (dance)...


11

郵便はがき postcard. 大日本 Dai Nippon "big Japan" or "Japanese empire". 樺太 Kara Futo, Sakhalin. 大泊町 Oh Tomari Cho, literally means "big harbor town". 東 east. 三条 3rd street. 南 south. 一ノ十一 one hyphen eleven. 髙橋 Taka Hashi, family name. 久男 Hisa O, a male name. 様 polite addressing like "Sir". 北満 Hoku Man, northern Manchuria. 龍江省 a Chinese geometric name, literally ...


11

「はね」is what I always hear it referred to as. A web search finds lots of sources to back this up: http://www.bunkei.co.jp/bunkei-app/soragaki/common/images/function.jpg http://www.y-adagio.com/public/standards/tr_fnttrm/fig7_7.gif http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E7%AD%86%E7%94%BB etc


10

Generally in Japanese handwriting the more feminine something is the more rounded out and cute it will be. If I think of girly English writing I think of neat bubbly letters while guys tend to be sloppy and angular. This carries over to Japanese. Additional reading: http://guideline.livedoor.biz/archives/51130942.html http://detail.chiebukuro.yahoo.co.jp/...


10

行書 & 草書 (semi-cursive and cursive writings) 行書【ぎょうしょ】 (semi-cursive script) is similar to English 'handwriting' style, and this is the most orthodox way of writing Japanese sentences fast. This is what Japanese students learn at middle school, although that does not necessarily mean all students master beautiful 行書. You can compare 楷書【かいしょ】 (regular ...


10

Assuming there is not anything preceding these letters that would alter its meaning, that would appear to say: 好きだ I (Like / Love) (You / It) "き" is often handwritten without the bowed bottom.


9

This looks like it isn't really related to foxes, but is オタ魂 written as one character. (I would read it オタ[魂]{こん}.) オタ is the abbreviation of オタク otaku 魂 meaning "soul" or "spirit" So, loosely something like ... "gamer's soul"? Edit. As @choco points out in the comments, オタコン refers to Otacon of the Metal Gear series.


8

Stroke order is important for hand-written Japanese, which includes normal handwriting and various styles of calligraphy. The stroke order gives a flow to the character that can be recognized, even when the character looks very different to its [楷書]{かいしょ} incarnation. For the non-expert, a character written in 楷書 (in the correct order) probably cannot be ...


8

I'm not Japanese, but based on what I know it is up to you to choose which style you would like to write in. However, as I commented previously, I recommend that you stick with the "handwritten" style rather than the "printed" one if you are using a pen or pencil. However, if you are using a brush then perhaps the other is more appropriate. There is a great ...


8

It's nothing to worry about, I would go as far to say that it's not even a different "radical". (How can it be? It's the same Kanji.) Just like in English, things get, shall we say, "corrupted" in hand writing. Nothing is ever as neat and pretty as the pixels on a finely crafted character. Fortunately, this is an easier one to remember. Ignore my awful ...


8

It looks like 印象 to me.​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​


8

I think the only character one would stumble over is い, because it looks close like a し with either a bit of dirt, or like an incomplete じ. The rest of characters are definitely legible. Two comments: き and さ are written with a gap in the curve (in handwriting). The next character I would point out would be に, which looks too much like two characters しこ. ...


7

Using ハ for particle "wa" was a part of their proper style to write official documents or letters at that time. The writing style of 日米和親条約 in your image is [候文]{そうろう・ぶん}, which was a formal writing style during the Edo period. If you would read other 候文 documents or letters written in the Edo period, you would notice that ハ is almost always used for ...


7

According to 非回答者 Cram all three into the bottommost block -- "す。」". The better schools, teachers and publishers will not accept any other method.


7

Line 6 Char 2; I would say is likely せ but I've not come across any instance where stroke 3 can extend below stroke 2, nor can I find a Kanji that comes closer. It this correct? You wrote ふせ. It should be 少女. Line 5 char 4; I would say is likely 這, since I can find a font that has the radical 言 with a vertical carrot on top instead of a bar, however ...


7

I noticed that most of the pairs in your list are between kana (mostly katakana) and kanji, with the only exception of へ. In my opinion, in most situations you can infer whether it's the kana or kanji symbol from the surrounding text. I think katakana symbols rarely sits alone on its own because we would find them in a bunch of at least 2 characters in a ...


7

That's not ネ, that's オー. See, there's a single vertical line all the way through it, and the ー looks like a ー. Fluent readers use context in reading, and can often read words even if a let_er is missing. The more words you learn, the more your brain will be able to match patterns accurately, regardless of how they're written. In this case, if you know ...


7

Handwriting is always harder to read, but I think in your case you miss practice. For me, reading difficult handwriting comes down to recognizing which strokes are used, and based on their number and approximate order, find the corresponding character. I am often stumped by unknown handwritten characters. The most glaring issues with what you've come up so ...


6

In Japanese calligraphy and penmanship, usually kana are written slightly smaller than kanji. Basically, the more strokes a character has, the larger it should be written for proper balance and appearance. This is because simple characters look larger than complicated ones with human eyes. This article says, "漢字:10、ひらがな:8、カナ・ローマ字・数字:7~6、特殊記号:6". Addition: ...


6

When you want to ask a Japanese person about a kanji/word... they may ask you to write it out. If you trace out the character with a finger on your palm IN THE CORRECT ORDER, they will probably be able to recognize the strokes and answer your question quickly. This shows up way more often than you'd expect. Frankly, it's easier to remember complex kanji if ...


6

I think it says 悟空のじいちゃん Goku's grandfather (そのラウンドのみ相手の必殺技を 封じる) (Blocks the opponent's special move in that round only) 占いババ Fortuneteller Baba (必殺技をつかっても一定時間BPがへらない (BP don't decrease for some fixed time, even if you use the special move



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