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"ようこそ、いらっしゃいませ" and "ようこそ、お越しやす," its popular Kansai version are a set of phrases welcoming the guest. "ようこそ" is a variation of "よくこそ" meaning “true / indeed / rightly.” よくこそ is used in such way as; よくこそ言ってくれた - Indeed, you said exactly what I wish to say. よくこそここまで来た - Really (Thank God), we came a long way up to here. Though the phrase, “いらっしゃいませ – ...


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I'll give you tl;dr for this question. During edo period, "domo" was used to express the feeling of confusion or unsureness about the person who he/she is talking to. "Domo nani mo ienu" is an old way saying "I am very unsure about what to say to you" or "I am very unsure who you are". In 1950s, the usage of domo was considered insincere. In 1960s, Keizo ...


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The modern day use of どうも as a greetings stems from the Edo period phrase どうも言えぬ, lit. "unable to speak in spite of oneself", used positively much like the way we use the English word "awesome" today. The どうも here was taken from the phrase and was used like すごく or 大変 (which would be translated as "very" or "quite). どうもお久しぶりでございます どうもありがとうございます ...



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