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14

ただいま is definitely not the right word for this situation. It is exclusively used when arriving home (typically, when you step inside the house). Sometimes, by extension, it can be used when coming back from a trip and stepping into the airport or the train station of your destination, talking to your loved ones waiting for you (or perhaps over the phone). ...


12

According to this okwave post, さよう was originally written as 然様{さよう}. It says that さよう has the meaning of そのよう/そう and that the 左 in 左様{さよう} is an 当{あ}て字{じ} (a Kanji used as a phonetic symbol, rather than for it's meaning.) In other words, the meaning doesn't have anything to do with 左, it's uses that character because of it's reading/pronunciation.


11

Your question is "is there a scenario when finishing with [] would be considered out of place or context?". As you noted, 宜しくお願い is similar to "Cheers" or "Regards", but the main difference is that neither of the latter are calls to action, whereas the former has more of a feeling of asking something. Accordingly, among coworkers, it's fine to use when ...


9

For my money, 「はい、どうも」 just can't be beat. What's that? Too informal, you say? Far from it, my good man. 「はい、どうも」 isn't a replacement for よろしく or 宜しくお願いします when you're winding down the conversation. But there's always that awkwardness that sets in - happens in English, too - when you and the person on the other end are saying conversation-ending-phrases ...


8

ごめんください is an idiomatic expression used to attract someone's attention when visitng that person's place. It does not mean 'appology' + 'please give' any more. Pretty much similar to your example but another variant is when you want something at a shop, and you don't see a shop clerk around, you can use this word to call someone. If the person you want to ...


8

As others said already, ただいま is just wrong in this situation: you're not announcing people around you in your house/lab/office that you're back, but just saluting someone who basically knows nothing about you and doesn't share any private space with you. Appropriate greetings for this kind of encounter with your neighbourhood range from こんにちは to いい天気ですね. I ...


8

The most common one is 奇遇ですね。 'It's coincidental (as if it were planned).' but it does not particularly mean you feel nice about it (nor does it mean it is bad). If you want to express that, you can just add the direct translation: またお会いできてよかったです。 'I am happy to meet with you again.


8

That guy who said that こんばんは isn't heard in everyday conversation is flat out wrong. I really hate when people get up on their high horse about Japanese, especially when they're wrong. Golden rule is, never "heckle" someone over their foreign language ability, because yours will never be perfect either. I've been at this for 11 years and have lived here ...


7

(First, a note: because there is a ご at the beginning of ごくろうさま, that お〜 is actually not there. :) I've most often heard ご苦労様{くろうさま} used by people older than myself, when I have done something for the person (or in some way have helped the person,) using that phrase. (Besides age, this could also happen in a business situation, where a senior worker is ...


7

おはよう or おはようございます is used when the time is considered as the beginning of a day in some sense. For example, if the addressee has just waken up, it is appropriate to use おはよう(ございます) even if it is not in the morning. On the other hand, if you stayed very late at workplace until 1 o’clock in the morning and met a colleague who was likely to have done the same ...


6

It might be ありがとうございやす with devoiced す. ございやす, whose meaning is the same as ございます, was used in the Edo dialect in the 16th–19th centuries, and seems to be still in use in the Ibaraki dialect. I do not think that either ありがとうございや or ありがとうございやす is used in the Nagoya dialect.


6

はじめまして'This is the first time seeing you' is a standard expression. If that person is in the same company, regardless of the department, you can continue as ...部門の...と申します 'I am called ..., and am from the ... department' It is more polite than ...部門の...です 'I am ... from the ... department', which may, but not necessarily, presuppose that ...


5

A hearty いらっしゃいませ! from the staff or owner brings back happy memories of Japanese restaurant/bar life. いらっしゃい is a perfectly ordinary word of greeting. A person who feels like the 'owner' of the get-together might well shout a いらっしゃいませ especially if alcohol is involved. There is also the possibility of using it ironically or with hostility on a late-comer - ...


5

こんばんは (今晩は) is the one in the dictionary for "Good evening!". I think that こんばんわ has a cuter feeling, maybe a little softer. It's a total guess, but it might be related to the feminine わ at the end of sentences. Actually, this page seems to be saying it's related to 和 (わ - peace) which gives it a nicer feeling.


5

sawa already gave a good explanation of the idiom ごめんください, but I will add another usage: it is also used at the end of conversation when the speaker leaves. In this meaning, it is also used over the phone, whereas I do not think that anyone says ごめんください at the beginning of a phone call. Using ごめんください when the speaker leaves (over the phone or not) sounds ...


4

I have thought without much grounds that this is an Edo word (江戸言葉). You can see it in 時代劇 such as 水戸黄門. But this also seems to be a 役割語 'stereotyped role words' that is assumed to be used by a lower-rank gangster/thief against the leader of the group. I am not sure whether it is actually so. I am surprised to hear that it is heard in present Nagoya. This ...


4

In response to the post's title, I think, yes, it's OK for electronic communications. But ご無沙汰しています (it's usually 〜ています or 〜ております) sounds weird for such a casual acquaintance (if he's even that much to you). I think it's reserved for very close and/or very important relationships (extended family members, past teachers/professors/senpai, old friends, ...


3

ようこそ means welcome but it's mostly used in written context rather than colloquial. いらっしゃいませ actually means "please come in" (literally) but it often carries the meaning of welcome, this is why you hear staff saying that whenever you visit a store, it is mostly colloquial. In a big event you may also hear ようこそ、いらっしゃいませ used together as well.


3

Apparantly お早うございます & お休みなさい are used among family members but not こんにちは&こんばんは. At some work places people regard other workers as similar to family members and consequently avoid using expressions that are used with non-family members. お早うございます is used in place of こんにちは&こんばんは and hence used at any hour of the day or night. (This comes from Nihongo notes 10 ...


3

It doesn't matter. Feel it out based on your relationship with that person and whatever feels right. I have to imagine that if you had contact with someone before and you said 初めまして upon meeting them in person it would be accompanied by that kind of weak laugh of shared awkwardness like "what do I say in this situation?" In other words, meeting people from ...


3

Is that person a native Japanese? I think he's not. こんばんは is used in normal conversation. By the way, there are several mistakes in your slide: p2. minna-san → minasan ibid. minasan konnichiwa is more natural than konnichiwa minasan p3. Biru → biiru p4. Dozo → douzo p4. Arrigato → arigatou p9. biru no go-hon → go-hon no biiru p9. puroguramaa no ...


2

I am not a native speaker but based on my experience supported by the comments above from native speakers, I would say it again, just as I might say "pleased to meet you" in English. It might partly depend on the context and the nature of your previous contact: When you meet finally F2F, there may be a "first time feel" to the occasion and it comes very ...


2

I doubt one says "上手に"+"分かる", since 分かる is "come to be understood", rather than "actively understand". The suggested 勉強になりました is pretty common. If you really want to say "I understand much better than before", you could say "やっと、分かってきた", "やっと理解するようになった", or "前より理解できた". Although I would probably add "かも(しれない)" at the end of all these examples, to be ...


2

おはようございます is often used as a start greeting in work situations, whatever time it may be, as opposed to the end greeting おつかれさまです. I know it's used in the TV and entertainment industry (it was the question of a quizz), and I've heard teachers use it to welcome their pupils as late as 19:30.


1

But consider that "good morning" is but a cross-language approximation. Literally, おはようございます means "you are early" (honorific お usually used when addressing the second-person as opposed to the first-person). So I expect it to be used also in situations where earliness is being described.


1

Dave & Mark are both correct. Personally tended to use どうもすみません to express surprise at our meeting, and then possibly followed by sucking air through the teeth and maybe a restrained こんにちは. This seemed to do the trick with my landlord / office maintenance person / neighbours / etc. BTW, I've only heard ただいまです〜 in anime or from when said with a hint ...


1

The size of the area seems to be the most crucial factor. For example, you can use ようこそ in welcoming someone to a country, prefecture, city, amusement park, etc, but いらっしゃいませ is for welcoming someone into an establishment (such as a restaurant or a store) within that larger area. いらっしゃいませ can also be used to invite people into an establishment; ようこそ does not ...



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