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2

As far as "pure" grammar, only the last verb phrase 「[自分]{じぶん}の[子供]{こども}を[産]{う}ませ」 modifies 「ようとしてるんだ」. In meaning, however, 「あいつ」 does have a 3-step plan: 1) Get a wife. 2) Remove the spell. 3) And let her give birth to his child. In this sense, the guy is ようとしている all of the three things. Thus, one could say that there are two correct answers, depending ...


1

I haven't formally studied this, but from exposure, I've taken it to mean the following: 心の準備も何も+negative: not even psychologically prepared, not even anything at all The negative sentence ending could be できていない, for example. Since all the objects in your example sentences are nouns, they can also take ある・ない, which skips the step of choosing an ...


3

The simple answer This いう, which you could gloss as "call", simply takes two arguments. You can call it a "accusative-quotative construction" (which is just a fancy way of saying that there is both an を-marked thing and a と-marked thing). The actual answer To learn more about these so-called accusative-quotative constructions, let us play with this ...


2

The question sounds a little vague, so my answer may or may not contain what you wanted to know. Whether it is the である/だ or です/ます style that you are writing in, you should NOT end every sentence with the same word(s). Otherwise, your writing would sound monotonous and boring. In the case of である and だ, there is a difference in nuance between the two; ...


1

Note:I cannot guarantee the accuracy of the information below so take it with a grain of salt. Any comments that point out inaccuracies would be appreciated. While I can't fully answer your question because I'm still learning myself, I can still provide some information that you don't know. I haven't found a textbook that goes into depth about the usage ...


2

~てくる has those meanings. to do something and come back here someone does something toward the speaker gradual change ([edit] or accumlation of acts) So, 運動してくる makes sense only when it's used in the meaning of 1. As for difference between ~てくる and ~てきた, the former means the gradual change progresses from now on, and the latter indicates a gradual change ...


1

By chance I just read something new (for me) on these expressions which explains Choko's answer (〜ませんか?): 〜ましょうか? is used when the speaker is in a position to make the relevant decision. When used as an invitation toward someone with who the speaker is not too close it can sound too familiar. ==>> 〜ませんか? is used as a polite invitation. The ...


0

I'm not really for the suggested translation, so I'm going to translate it myself. Although other people and I will be gone, the events in the songs will remain. Even if time shifts and things leave, (even if) delights and sorrows come and go, (how could I deny) that the characters of this song will be there If the threads of green willows never ...


1

You could say something like 今の{授業・クラス}は? 今なんの{授業・クラス}? 今出席の{授業・クラス}は?


5

My true feeling is that the expression 「~~も[何]{なに}もあったものではない」 should be memorized (and actively used) as a common idiom than be analyzed grammatically. It is an expression of "total" negation. "There is no ~~ whatsoever!" 「~~も何も」 lumps together things that are like or related to "~~". See ...


4

I feel like that there is actually a subtle difference but I also think that I might not ever have thought about it had I not seen this question. In that sense, I appreciate the question. Are we native speakers required to be aware of the difference? No, I do not think so unless one wants to write professionally. I think that "[N1]を[N2]とした[N3]" sounds ...


6

I think I would probably say スカイプで話しませんか?


2

奥{おく} is the part far away from the "entrance" of a thing, so it could be translated by bottom or back for example depending of the type of object (e.g. a vase or a room). Or end in the case of a shelf ; it will most likely refer to the part the farther from the speaker / listener in this case. So 一番{いちばん}おく would indeed be the far end of the shelf here. ...


2

There are two places for は in the sentence: メルボルンに(は)旅館(が/は)ありますか? The first は in the sentence is more or less required if you are contrasting メルボルン to something else, as you are in the first dialogue. In the second dialogue it's optional. As for the second は in the sentence, I think I would go even further than 非回答者 and say that ○ありますか? should be は ...


6

In this context, 「て」 = 「ても」. In informal speech, 「て」 is often used instead of 「ても」. What is 「ても」, then? It is a compound of two particles used to express "permission" or "tolerance". Both of the following phrases mean "It is OK to ~~", "It is OK if ~~" with the first one being more informal than the second. 「~~て(も)いい」 「~~て(も)かまわない」 Thus, your ...


5

In both cases, the natural particle choice would be 「は」. The speaker simply does not have enough reason to use「が」 in either of the two. You need a good reason to use 「が」 but J-learners tend to over-use it. "In Sydney, I saw a ryokan. Are there ryokans in Melbourne?" In this situation, the speaker does not know whether or not there are ryokan in ...


2

おく means the interior of something but is often used to mean "in the back". This is the use of 方 (ほう) meaning a direction. So put together you get something like "toward the deepest" part of the shelf, which you textbook has chosen to express as the "far end".


1

Assuming there is no talk of 旅館 beforehand, then in the first conversation you have introduced the topic (旅館) with the first line so yes, you would use は not が when asking if there are 旅館 in Melbourne. But, rather than: メルボルンに旅館はありますか? I might have said: 旅館はメルボルンにもありますか? or even: メルボルンにもありますか?、旅館は・・ (You might even not have to mention 旅館 ...


1

As requested, to break things down into parts... 自分でもそれをやってみます。 【自分】oneself / myself 【で】by (preposition) 【も】too 【それをやってみます】 will try to do it For pure comprehension purposes, this can be made easier to understand by replacing【自分でも】with【私も】+【自分で】 e.g.【私も自分でそれをやってみます。】 Effectively, "I too, will try to do it by myself." (As opposed to leaving the ...


4

First question about で: かみに means "on the paper" ("write on the paper") while かみで would mean "with the paper" in a sense "using a tool" as in "write with a pen". So your second sentence requires で: このボールペンで電話番号を書いてください Second question about から: when you go out of a location, you use を particle in this situation, not から. Note that から is used as well in ...


0

The meaning of these two sentences are almost the same and are interchangeable. However, there is another minor nuance difference, which is not based on grammatical things. By adding 「-くる」, it reminds the reader or the hearer that the subject of the sentence is a baby and makes put more focus on a baby than a mother. In other words, it adds a hidden nuance ...


7

やめとこう is the volitional form of やめとく, which is a very frequently heard contraction of やめておく (やめる written in kanji would be 止める: to stop (doing something)). The て-form of a verb plus おく (originally from 置く: to put down) is a bit hard to explain concisely, but usually should be taken as to (not) do something now, rather than let things run their course. In ...


6

The て-form of a verb followed by いた (past tense of いる: to be) indicates the past progressive tense (e.g., 食べていた "I was eating", 飲んでいた "I was drinking"). In spoken Japanese though, the い of いた is usually silent, so it sounds like tabe[teta] and non[deta].


1

Yes, it's correct (aside from tense of the verb) and the verb should be adnominal form (attributive form) since こと is a noun. ように・・ is also correct and actually more common for that meaning, though it doesn't mean "(if that was the case) that means you wouldn't be able to do it".


0

If there are several uses for the 〜ようにする construct, then I could be way off... but here is one explanation from an N3 grammar study book* that I have been using: 〜ようにする Expresses the act of making an effort to do something habitually. Example 健康のために、野菜を食べるようにしています。 I try to eat more vegetables for the sake of my health. Edit: On the same ...


1

It seems to be closest to 《接続助詞「に」+係助詞「も」》, using 大辞泉's second meaning for も as a 係助詞: ② 他にも類似の事物が存在することを言外にほのめかす形で,ある事物を提示する。 To apply this definition here, I would say the も is emphasizing the otherness of His Majesty - intimating that it might not be the idea the speaker would have, but His Majesty has his own ideas.


2

You can break なの down into the formal noun の and the adnominal copula な (i.e., a form of だ which shows up before nouns). Your sentence: Basically, the sentence (彼が)男の子だ is embedded into は知ってる by turning it into a noun using の.   (彼が)男の子だ ⇒[(彼が)男の子な]のは知ってる Alternatives: You could also write it as 男の子であるのは知ってる "I know that he's a boy." which ...


4

Where to start... 「どうしても」, in this context, means "no matter what". The nuance is "One has no choice but to ~~." This is an extremely common phrase. Regarding the "triple" negative, it is only "double" at best in reality. By the Japanese standard, it is actually only "single". 「[着]{き}なきゃだめなの」 Negative #1 = 着なきゃ, colloquial for 着なければ ("if I do ...


3

なの? is the plain form of ですか?, not a negative. どうしても can be understood as "no matter what" in this context. Is that enough to help you understand the meaning of the sentence?


3

My answer is based on the assumption that the sentence in question has been correctly transcribed. 「お[姉]{ねえ}やんに[会]{あ}ったら、もっと[惨]{みじ}めな[気持]{きも}ちになった。」 can only mean one thing with or without any further context. It means: "When I met you, my older sister, I felt more miserable." to borrow your own TL. A native speaker would never say ...


2

よう(だ) in this sentence is used to express inference based on reliable information (often based on what the speaker sees) or similarity. It is not the volitional form of a verb. You can translate it as "look like", "look as if", "seem", "be like", etc. It is often used with まるで which gives it more emphatic meaning "just like", "exactly as if". A verb can ...


7

手前【てまえ】 has a number of uses; the pronoun being the much rarer case. Here it means "before" as in time. 挑みかかる手前な顔 A face one would make just before initiating a challenge. My eyes locked onto her; what with a girl dressed in a kimono being far from common. Our eyes met and she pursed her lips and made a face as if to say "bring it on".


4

We have two different words here -- two different で's. Auxiliary verb vs. Particle. In the phrase 「[秋]{あき}の[風]{かぜ}は[静]{しず}かで」, the 「で」 is the [連用形]{れんようけい} (= "continuative form") of the affirmation auxiliary verb 「だ」. Thus, the phrase will surely be followed by another phrase in regular prose-style writing. As a title of a creative writing, however, ...


6

You can parse it like this: (平民が、貴族にそんな[口]{くち}(を)[利]{き}いて(も)いい)と、思って(い)るの? I think it's like "Do you think that 平民 is allowed to talk to 貴族 that way?" そんな modifies 口(≒way of talking). 口を利く means "to speak, to talk".



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