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6

There is nothing incorrect or ungrammatical about the sentence: 「[私]{わたし}が[世界]{せかい}で[一番偉]{いちばんえら}いだって??」 because this is different from saying: 「私が世界で一番偉いだ。」, which is ungrammatical. 「だって」 in the sentence in question is placed after a quote, is it not? 私が世界で一番偉いだって?? = 『私が世界で一番偉い。』だって?? Depending on the context, it may be: ...


0

Yes you are right, the と is used as a quote. Feliksas - I am called that. Once you know the root of the word 申します the reason becomes clear. 申します is the keigo (polite) form of 言います. と言います can be used for reported speech. あの女の子は「私はもう大丈夫です」と言いました。 That girl said "I am all right now". That girl said she was all right at the time. On a side note - if you are ...


1

I don't think there are any な-adj in the third sentence at all (only nouns, which function like な adjectives), に is used as a general location particle, and is not limited to actual places, the first clause in 箸を櫂にして川を上っていきました which is 箸を櫂にして would mean, "Chopsticks, in (in the form of a) paddle, is done" "In the way of a paddle, chopsticks were being ...


2

I think you're actually asking about にする and not just に. に isn't a verb after all. It has a lot of uses, each probably worth a question of their own. Here are some definitions from Jisho.org: AをBにする to place, or raise, person A to a post or status B to transform A to B; to make A into B; to exchange A for B to make use of A for B; to view ...


7

In formal Japanese, this is the standard 連用形. It's used in place of て form of verbs when linking. It's usage in 敬語{けいご} actually goes beyond this, with these suffixes also helping form verbs. In the context of your quote, both are replaceable with て form in everyday speech. The general rule being to take the ます stem, remove this, and replace as necessary ...


7

This 〜た is the perfect, not past; that is, it's indicating a time before some reference time, rather than a time before speech time: 傘を持っていったほうがいい。 Lit. "Having brought an umbrella would be better." That said, I don't think native speakers actually have such a complicated model (of comparing possible future worlds, one of which where you have brought ...


5

どんなに寒くても...(No matter how cold it is...) is correct, but どんなに寒いでも is incorrect. Maybe it was a typo of どんなに寒い日でも or something. You form the phrase this way: with i-adjectives: 「どんなに/どれほど+連用形(~く)+て+も」 eg. 「どんなに忙しくても」「どんなに古くても」 with na-adjectives: 「どんなに/どれほど+連用形(~で)+も」 eg. 「どんなにきれいでも」「どんなに好きでも」 with nouns: 「どんなに/どれほど+(adjective)+noun+で+も」 eg. ...


4

The suffix た does not automatically imply past tense. In this free online dictionary, for instance, it lists 8 different meanings /usages of 「た」. https://kotobank.jp/word/%E3%81%9F-556028#E5.A4.A7.E8.BE.9E.E6.9E.97.20.E7.AC.AC.E4.B8.89.E7.89.88 Sure, you may not be able to read it, but it would at least give you a good sign that you should forget about ...


6

「[写真]{しゃしん}があった[方]{ほう}があなたがどんな[人]{ひと}なのかわかるし、フレンドも[作]{つく}りやすくなります。」 is a perfectly normal sentence with a fairly simple sentence structure. It says "Condition A will bring Result #1 and Result #2". Condition A:「写真があった方が」 Result #1:「あなたがどんな人なのかわかる」 Result #2:「フレンドも作りやすくなる。」 In 「写真があった方が」, 「方」 is used to compare (implicitly) two situations. ...


2

Actually, there is no definite way of "parsing" a sentence, i.e. distinguishing the components : it depends on the context. See for example this very funny twitter thread about the sentence, where native speakers try to find all possible interpretations : 頭{あたま}が赤{あか}い魚{さかな}を食{た}べた猫{ねこ} However, it should be obvious that in a given context, only one ...


2

It is hard to think of an example where I would expect 思う to take an object, other than when thinking about something e.g. 母のことを思う. I wonder if the を here is the object of 育てる rather than 思う. It would help you if you could somehow forget the notion "思う = 'to think'" for a moment. I could be wrong but I feel that might be what is preventing you ...


1

毎日テレビを見ている is conscious that you are keeping the habit so far but could quit it soon or some time. On the other hand, 毎日テレビを見る is not conscious of that. And, 私は本を読む depends on contexts.


0

It was purely a form of inflection, but because of sound shift (食べむ → 食べよう、言はむ → 言おう) it collapsed.


2

Since たがる means "to try to do something", you can use it as long as "to want" is interchangeable to "to try to do", (though たがる has contemptuous nuance and not desirable to aply to actions by a specific person who is supposed to be respected like your teacher). Otherwise, it doesn't work. As for your examples, in addition to Blavius's answer, "Do they want ...


2

When asking a question, you still will want to use たい instead of たがる. The reason for this is that がる really means that you are concluding based on certain observations, and also makes the sentence sound impersonal. This is why it is suitable for third person but not first person, because using it with the latter would make it sound like you're guessing your ...


1

After posting this question I found this link. Lessons 24 to 28 systematically introduce the conditionals and the reasons for choosing each one. Here's my attempt at a summary 〜と Use when the main clause is an inevitable or uncontrollable result of the condition 電気をつけると、明るくなります. ニューヨークに行くとおもしろい店がたくさんある。 ~ば/なら ば is used for verbs and ...


5

Edited in bold font An action in non-past tense in a なら clause is to succeed that of the main clause, and if you use it wrongly, people will misunderstand which happens before and which after. Past tense in なら clauses stands for if it's true or not. As long as you use なら correctly, たら is enough versatile to replace ~と and ~ば. You can't use たら for actions ...


4

People would figure out what you mean and forgive you because you're only a learner of Japanese, but you may get a few strange looks for some sentences. The commenter's research study in your cited question, attributed to a study done in 1989 by Shinji Sanada also shows もっと早く{起きると/起きれば/起きたら}よかった。 I should have woken up earlier. Tokyo: 4% と; 94% ば; 2% たら ...


1

The first part, 彼の実力をかんがえて is not immediately incomprehensible, but since the construction ~をかんがえて usually stands for "showing consideration for", it sounds quite unnatural. You should use conditional phrases here, like かんがえたら, かんがえれば, かんがえると etc. The last part, 今回のかれの受賞は驚くには当たらない should always be 驚くには. You cannot replace it with 驚くのには. There's ...


4

か can follow である in subordinate clauses. For example, 真実であるかは不明。Whether it is true or not is unknown. (You can also say it as 真実かどうかは不明。) か can also follow だ in subordinate clauses, as @snailboat says. For example, なぜだかわからない。I don't know why.


1

You can say 彼の実力を考えると(or考えれば)、今回の彼の受賞は驚くには(or驚くに)当たらない。 Using 考えて or 驚くのには would sound unnatural here, I'm afraid.


0

I think if you use と, you should fix it as Takashi's comment if you use て, i think the 2nd one is ok. However, the 3rd one may be changed to 「驚くのは当たらない」(remove に)


0

Using the present tense in the subordinate clause: 私は日本に行くとき、ラジオを買います。 This would mean 'I (will) buy a radio when I am going to Japan'. You'll probably buy the radio right before you fly to Japan. The past tense for this would be: 私は日本に行くとき、ラジオを買いました。 This means something like 'I bought a radio when I was going to Japan.' Note that the tense ...


3

Most textbooks note that using か to mark two noun alternatives, the last one can be omitted. You are probably talking about something like this: ステーキか、すしにします。 / ステーキか、すしを食べます。 (I'll have either steak or sushi.) However, you cannot omit the second か in a sentence like below, even though か marks two noun alternatives: ...


4

図書館でいろいろな教室でできないことができる。 This is not grammatically wrong, but a little hard to understand. いろいろな教室でできないこと sounds like 'things you can't do in various classrooms' (The いろいろな looks like modifying 教室). If you mean 'In the library, you can do various things you can't do in the classroom' then you can say 図書館では、教室で(は)できないことがいろいろできる。 or ...


5

作業 is closer to tasks or procedures, which can be 'finished' in a few minutes or a few days. 仕事 refers to both small tasks and lifelong vocations. If you want to ask someone's occupation, you can say "あなたの仕事は何ですか?" but not "あなたの作業は何ですか?" (well, let's forget about honorific expressions for now). When you look at a calendar and want to check what you have to ...


9

First, the の seen in the first sentence is a nominalizer, which converts verbs and adjectives into nouns. See this post for how it works, but in short, it is の that makes it mean "small(er) one" here. Second, より ("than") doesn't only attach to nouns but to verbs and adjectives too. It also doesn't change the meaning the former word has. Third, 方 accepts ...


4

「[連体形]{れんたいけい} of Verb or Adjective + こと + adjective expressing an extreme degree」 「連体形」 means the attributive form. 「こと」 nominalizes the preceding verb or adjective and, at the same time, emphasizes its meaning. こと = 事, but hiragana is preferred for this usage these days.


-2

I'm fairly sure it's a nominalizer converting the adjective 騒々しい into a noun. In English it would mean "thing" with 騒々しいこと meaning the "noisy thing." It's not usually written as a kanji, but 事 is the one to pick.


1

(In the first place, I don't think "in Japanese, the passive voice leaves the focus of the action on the person performing the action" but on the recipient.) It doesn't only change focus or emphasis but also the meaning itself, in other words, 犬が食べられた doesn't mean "I ate a dog" or "a dog was eaten by me", but "they ate our dog", more accurately, "a dog in a ...


5

You are making a mistake lots of people make – you are trying to think about what your sentence will look like in English. You might do this with most European languages, but you definitively can't do this with Asian languages. So as you said, your first sentence is correct: 金曜日にケーキを食べる. Basically, all you did in your second sentence was indicate that ...


3

Your assumption is right. That ばかり was originally used in the form of 目もくらまんばかり, which meant "so much that you are only escaping being dazzled" → "so much that you are nearly dazzled". In that sense, it's interchangeable as you said. And, if there's a difference from ほど・くらい at all, it could be that ばかり's version is a rhetorical expression and thus, could ...


1

Well, depends on what you mean by "adverbial clause". If you try to interpret that term extremely formally in a linguistic sense, no, it's not. But, I think you're generally on to something: Predicates (which can be verbs, i-adjectives, or nouns/na-adjectives + the copula), take: arguments (parts of the clause that are necessary to understand the ...


1

なんじ refers to a time of day. いつ is a generic "when". I see why you're confused, but いつ is going to be the more common in this context. なんじ is more of a fixed time of day as opposed to いつ, which is far more general. You can use なんじ, and it's not unnatural at all, but I think it reflects something of a "what time did you receive my text" rather than a "when ...


3

It needs to be 「たえ[子]{こ}に[続]{つづ}く」 and not 「たえ子が続く」. 「たえ子に続く。」=「私はたえ子に続く。」 It means "I followed Taeko (into the store)." 「たえ子が続く」 makes no sense because Taeko has already entered the store. Taeko cannot follow Taeko.


1

Even though Eric says it is not rude to use ください is japanese, based on your question, you are looking for a softer way to ask/request things. ・ください is like a formal and cold please but can be a bit straight sometimes. You can use it when you are the customer or the supervisor. Otherwise, to avoid this straightness, the sentence is often turned the other way ...


1

Sentences in Japanese tend to revolve around the perspective of animate objects rather than inanimate objects. Because passive sentences are seen from the subject's perspective rather than the agent's (which is pretty much the main reason to use passive), it sounds weird to have an inanimate subject and an animate agent. This is true in English, too. The ...


3

けれども is a contradictory conjugation expressing something along the lines of "but" or "however." The ど/ども part in this expression is the part that expresses the contradiction. By a means of shortening one's speech (through laziness, etc.) the different forms came into usage. The shortening is analogous to contractions in English (cannot -> can't). As such, ...


5

彼はぜひ日本人です。 is not acceptable, I'm afraid. You use ぜひ this way: ぜひ参加してください。 'please' (for invitation/request) ぜひ参加させていただきます。 'by all means' (when accepting offer) 彼はきっと日本人です。 sounds fine. 'I believe he's Japanese' / 'I'm sure he's Japanese'. 彼は必ず日本人です。 is not acceptable. 必ず is used this way: 必ず来ます。 'without fail' (for future action) 寝る前に必ず歯を磨く。 'never fail ...


4

けど is the short form of けれども, which could be written け(れ)ど(も), because all of けれども, けれど, けども, けど are used. けども is what, in my experience, is often used in a half formal, half informal setting. It is more refined than けど, but not quite as stiff as けれども.


5

Hey I have lived in Japan for almost 10 years and have been a student of Japanese for 15 years. Someone has something → (誰か)は(何か)を持っている Someone has someone → (誰か)は(誰か)がいる Something has something → (何か)に(何か)がある For the examples you gave, you would say: 私は本を3冊持っている 私は息子3人がいる この部屋に窓がある 持つ literally means 'to hold' so when you use it in ...


0

I'm not a native or an expert, but possession in Japanese is so different from English in my opinion, that it's better to avoid thinking of possession as an active ownership, like English. I'm not sure about the sentences you gave, but rather than having an actual verb for 'to own', the sentences literally translate to: as for (owner), (object) exists. ...


3

Even without any context to go with, only [b. 行くことにしようよ] is correct as a phrase. We would never say [a. 行こうとしようよ] or [c. 行くようになろうよ] in any situation. The problem with [a. 行こうとしようよ] is that it is double-volitional (行こう & しよう) and it is ungrammatical. It is grammatical to say 「行くとしよう」 or 「行こうとする」 in single-volitional, but not 「行こうとしよう」 in double. ...


4

In this case, 「つめたい かぜの ふく」 is a noun modifier(1)(2) for 日. Basically, the verb clause the precedes the noun modifies it in a similar way to "that" in English. For example (from the references above): ボブは、いつも勉強する人だ。 = Bob is an always-does-studying person. = Bob is a person who always studies. In the same way, 「つめたい かぜの ふく」 is modifying 日. ...


4

You are on the right track. In this case, 「ある」 and 「ひ」 should be regarded as two independen words rather than 「あるひ」 split into two parts. 「ある」, all by itself, can mean "one ~~" or "a certain ~~" (and it is used at the beginning of virtually every children's story.) 「ある つめたい かぜの ふく ひ」 is a relative clause (not a sentence) in which both 「ある」 and ...


3

Although it may depend on the context, I would basically say 'no'. The two phrases mean different things and because of that, one would expect different types of phrases to follow each. The two would largely be uninterchangeable. 「[漢字]{かんじ}の[読]{よ}み[方]{かた}はおろか」 would mean "not to mention how to read (the) kanji", "not to mention how (the) kanji are read", ...


4

Basically, 疎{おろ}か is an adjective (形容動詞) so it has to "decorate" a noun. In Japanese a nominalized sentence just behave like a noun so both of your sentences are grammatical and make sense. But their meaning is slighly different. 漢字{かんじ}の読{よ}み方{かた}はおろか,... Not to mention the way kanji are read, ... Whereas, 漢字{かんじ}を読{よ}むのはおろか,... Not to ...


2

No, at least not always. It is correct to use 「~~ますから」 in stand-alone statements expressing a reason-and-result or cause-and-effect relationship. 「[明日]{あす}また[来]{き}ますから、このパソコンはここに[置]{お}いておきますね。」"I am leaving this PC here because I will come back tomorrow again." It is NOT correct, however, to use 「~~ますから」 followed by 「です」 in an answer stating a ...


2

Yes you can, the two sentences are equally natural, and identical in meaning.


6

Nine times out of ten, this sentence is based on 「あきらめたら、そこで試合終了ですよ」, which is a famous line from SLAM DUNK, a manga series featuring basketball: And the "official" English translation is "When you give up, that's when the game is over." This phrase is almost like a proverb, and used frequently at least by native Japanese speakers, even when they're ...



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