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5

We say usually 村上春樹の本はありますか?. "written by" is translated as "によって書かれた and ~著作の" but we usually omit them.


5

ところ in this sentence means "part". 笑うトコあったのか means "Is there a part which we laugh at." ところ means "part, place". For example, この辺に走る(走れる)所あったっけ? (Is there a place around here where I can run?).


0

If you did something bad, let's say had an accident with your brother's car you would say: 兄{あに}なら理解{りかい}してくれる or 理解{りかい}してくれるつもりだ This is what 理解 is used for. 理解できない! would mean "He can't understand" (why that accident happens, why all that happened). A second meaning is "I can't believe it" in a stronger tone than "信じれない". So depending on what ...


0

alc.co.jp seems to be a very nice website that I just bookmarked. There are a lot of kanjis but they are using simple Japanese. いいえ、まだ食べていません。Emphasis is put on the current state (of the conversation). Well at least this is what they want to say by 現在の状態. いいえ、まだ食べません。Emphasis is put on the fact that wether the action is over or not, has been ...


2

という is easy to understand if you deconstruct it as と (referring to a quotation) and いう/言う (to say) I render it in my mental translation to English as "that which is said" or "so called" In your case "news of" seems a pretty good rendition as well. The meaning added with this is that rather than referring directly to the subject the reference is to the ...


2

In this example という can be translated quite literally. と is the quote particle and いう is "to say". So we get "the news saying that they got married".


5

The way I think of という is that it effectively puts quotes around something. So when you have "結婚したという知らせ", it's clear that the "結婚した" part is being talked about in a meta sense. To contrast that, if you just say ”結婚した知らせ", that can also be interpreted as "the announcement that was married". Though people can still figure out what you are saying, I'd argue ...


1

First, I'd like to correct the themes. は means the main focus is the thing after it. が or other case particles put in a prominent position in the main clause of a sentence mean the main focus is the thing before it. In other words, this feature is lost in sub clauses. So, as you say, 何がそれかわからない and それが何かわからない are the same, though the former sounds somehow ...


1

This page highlights in red the part right after the "語幹" (gokan) and calls it "活用語尾" (katsuyou gobi), so I think it is the term you are looking for. This page only describes names two parts of the verb: "語幹" (gokan) and "活用語尾" (katsuyou gobi), and then all of the different verb forms.


1

Apparently the meaning of "まだ…~ない(ません)" differs depending on the type of a verb. transitive verbs or intransitive verbs (unergative): ☆~ていません もうご飯を食べましたか。 Have you eaten yet? いいえ、まだ食べていません。 No, I haven't eaten yet. ☆~ません 今からご飯を食べますか。 Are you going to eat now? いいえ、まだ食べません。 No, I'm not going to eat yet. intransitive verbs (unaccusative): ☆~ていません/~ません ...


3

Is this something that brother would understand, but probably not another person? If so, I would use this expression: [兄]{あに}なら[分]{わ}かると[思]{おも}います。 The particle ”を” is not commonly used with the verb 分かる (though it is in rare cases), "が" is usually more appropriate. However, it is best to omit "それが" since it is implied. Also, without the "と思います" part ...


2

I'll give this one a shot. この料理を作ってもう3・4回目になるだろうな。 I think the main thing that is awkward about your translation is the "作るのをはじめて” part, which I don't think is correct grammar. I think you could replace 作って in my translation with 作りはじめて, but I don't think it's required. Commonly the "-te" form is also used to show how much time has elapsed since doing ...


3

To me, both sound a bit clumsy. I would say this like this: 趣味は書くことと、素敵なノートや文房具を集めることと、テレビゲームをすることです。 趣味は書くことや、素敵なノートと文房具を集めることや、テレビゲームをすることです。 You can simply list two or more things ("A, B and C") using や or と. See other questions for the difference between the two, although the nuance would be small in this case: Difference between と and や~など ...


1

Good points from naruto. I'll try to add some thoughts on why using topic-marker 'wa' is even possible. 'Wo' marks the direct object in the sentence. So the most vanilla way of saying "I put the garbage in a different bag" is: ごみをべつのふくろにいれます。 This is the no-frills, plain-Jane version of this sentence. To go to the next step, we need to review that ...


1

そういうこと in the first dialog corresponds to the second meaning: 「前述の発言内容を全面的に肯定する」. This そういうこと refers to the "lesson" which 音ちゃん just realized (自慢しちゃダメ). This kind of そういうこと can be translated as "Now you understand it", "Yeah, that's what I mean", etc. (Strictly speaking, in this case, 音ちゃん had not explicitly said something like 自慢しちゃダメだった when he said ...


10

The most concise explanation would be: A なら B means "if there is an A, there is a B" A たら B means "if A is completed, B happens" なら doesn't really care about the time order. B could take place before, while, after doing A, or all time during A. It just tells "an A must be accompanied by a B". In linguistic jargon, なら makes aoristic condition. ...


4

All of these sentences are grammatically almost correct, but you should use を instead of お for the particle o, and you should use は instead of わ for the particle wa. Here are the corrected sentences: ごみはべつのふくろにいれます。 べつのふくろにごみをいれます。 ごみをべつのふくろにいれます。 Sentence 1 uses the topic marker wa instead of o, and the sentence sounds like you're ...


0

From what I understand (which may or may not be correct), the nuance is on the implied intent. → まだ食べません would be "I'm not eating yet". There is some implicit meaning that you are going to eat next, or very soon. Emphasis is put on the action. → まだ食べていません would be "I haven't eaten". In that case, the emphasis is put on the fact that you have not eaten, but ...


2

how can I know that 兄 in 【娘が「これ、借りて良い」と、兄に許可を求めている。】refers to 娘's elder brother rather than 筆者's elder brother? In the first sentence the only subject is 娘 -- marked by が. Ergo, the one who receives permission to borrow from "brother" must be the daughter. And with that referent being set, then without a lot of other context, it's hard to make the ...


3

Yes, it is the も meaning "also/even." This も after quotative と is fairly common, and while it could certainly be the emphatic "even" sense (the larger context would help make it clear if we should be surprised by the writer considering ignoring the call), it also commonly means a simple "also." In that sense, it would mean that the writer thought of ...


1

I think 兄 is 娘's elder brother. 1.It is hard to think that 娘 seek to borrow something like clothes of this writer's elder brother, who is an uncle for 娘、because this writer said 同じような体つきのふたり(same frame). 2.I think the reason is because this context indicate it. And if 兄 is this writer's elder brother, I think this writer write 私の兄.


5

Think about it in terms of context. If you are in a space without any language, what are the traits and qualities you want to convey? Read the Japanese and try and emulate the context, then from the context go to English. Trying to find one-to-one corollaries is interesting and good for word-by-word translating, but for conveying meaning correctly, we ...


2

第一 (≂ そもそも) means "to begin with", or "in the first place". 殺しちゃ(=殺したら)楽しめねえだろ (≂ 殺してしまったら、楽しめないだろう) means "Once you have killed (people), you can't have fun (with them anymore)". So he's saying he does not particularly enjoy killing people, and that he can't have fun anymore if he has killed them... (implying he enjoys doing various things to them before ...


0

第一 means "besides all that", 'first of all" 殺しちゃ is the change of 殺しては and it means "if I kill (persons)" in this sentence. 楽しめねぇだろ is the change of 楽しめないだろ and it means "I can't have fun" He says that "Not particularly. First of all, if I kill persons, I can't have fun in various ways." in the last sentence.


1

Here are three examples of socially correct usage I found on the web: ああ、富士山、ただただ美しい限りだ。- Aaah, Fuji-san, just so supremely beautiful. (used most frequently when referring to beautiful mountains or sweeping views) #お美しい限り - a hashtag (e.g. twitter, instagram) indicating "beautiful people" 「面白い限り、オリンピック・エンブレム問題」- "???, the Olympic Emblem ...


3

They are both natural-sounding Japanese sentences, given the right context, so they are both 'correct'. Whether or not they have the same meaning depends on how you define 'meaning'. Do they describe the same state? Yes. Are they interchangeable for each other? Very much no. The difference regards how the information is presented - which part is information ...


3

僕には料理が得意。 is simply ungrammatical. 僕にはペンが必要です。 is grammatical only because 必要だ can take two arguments (AがBに) as word-specific feature, not that it's a universal grammar for adjectives. It's like the English word worth can have an object but most other adjectives can't. Other adjectives that take に include ふさわしい (あなたが隊長にふさわしい) and 夢中だ (僕は君に夢中だ) ...


5

I originally thought とわかった was と分かった It is, but it might better help to translate it as identified here, rather than understood. That sentence means: The people whom they identified at the hospital as (having) "Economy Class Syndrome" numbered 19 besides/in addition to this woman.


6

I don't really trust myself with my Japanese grammar skills so you might want to get a second opinion on this, but this is how I would translate "I want to do things like watch a movie, study Japanese, read a book, etc." into Japanese: 私は映画を見たり、日本語を勉強したり、本を読んだりしたいです。 So starting with the usual X~たり、Y~たりします pattern the only thing that needs to change if you ...


1

というのは is a fixed phrase. と: the quotative particle which is used with いう いう: "say" の: the nominalizer (turns a verb into a noun) は: the topic marker So literally, ○○というのは is something like "saying ○○ is ..." というのは can be used in two ways. というのは used alone at the beginning of a sentence is a conjunctional phrase, which means "I mean", "That is to say", ...


1

I believe that in this case というのは simply is used with the general purpose of defining something (in this case useful and non-useful jobs). So I think that the two というのは in the second sentence just refer to the respective 職業 before them rather than the people. Maybe in this case, just for the sake of comprehension, would make sense to translate というのは with ...


1

They have different meanings. Because they mean different things, you can't freely replace one by the other. 「とどまらず」is a negation of 「とどまる」, and 「のみならず」 is a negation of 「のみなり」. Here, the 「とどまる」 is a verb, the 「のみ」 is an adverbial particle, and the 「なり」 is an auxiliary verb of determination. Having said that, the meanings the two words have are: ...


0

As you said, “だ” is a colloquial form of “です,” a predicate meaning “is, am,” and "食べたばかりだ” means “I’ve finished meal just now.” “だ” here functions as I am in the state of having finished meal just now.


0

僕には料理が得意 when you say like this, it will give the impression that someone else you are going to talk about is not good at cook. It's same like this, 僕にはできません I can't do it (but someone can do it) 僕がペンを大切にする can be translated as I care about the pen.


4

First, there's one use of 「恥じる」 you may have not been acquainted with. From 広辞苑 under 「恥じる」: ③(多く、否定を伴う)ひけをとる。劣る。 【(often accompanied by a negative) compare unfavorably with; to be inferior】 As hinted at in the dictionary, in this use the word often appears in the construction 「(~に)恥じない」, which means: "be not inferior to; i.e. be comparable with, be ...


1

"...に(を)恥じる" is opposite to "...を誇る - to be proud of." So it is all right to translate it as "to feel ashamed of sth." You can also rephrase it with "feel sorry (for)" and "feel embarrassed about, with sth).


6

There's a common way of speaking to tell somebody does something with multiple purposes. 彼女はダイエットと趣味を兼【か】ねて水泳をしている。 兼ねる Ichidan verb, Transitive verb 2. to serve two or more functions or roles simultaneously; to contain (or combine) two or more features


2

Both are correct. できる means exactly the same thing as することができる. You can treat it as a special potential form of する. So it's not that できる is being attached to a noun, it's that it is taking the place of する in a する verb. Here are a couple more examples: この部屋はうるさくて勉強できない。(勉強することができない) 明日の予約が確認できた。(予約を確認することができた) Note that it's most common to mark the ...


3

You can use "と" like ダイエットと楽しみのために.


1

I think- ★Yoshio-san's car is red and white. is most correct translation. The second translation, ★Yoshio-san's cars are (one) red and (the other) white just make CARS as plural, but the sense is not changed as Yoshio-san has 2 cars out of which one in red and other is white. It can mean that "All the cars Yoshio-san has are red and white".


4

Depending on the context and circumstances, it could actually mean EITHER Just by itself, one could say it means "Yoshio-san's car is red and white"


0

[食]{た}べたばかりだ。(Tabeta bakari da) I have just eaten. 食べたばかりなの?(Tabeta bakari nano?) Have you just eaten? 食べたばかりではない。(Tabeta bakari dewa nai) I have not just eaten. Because 食べたばかり is abbreviated from 食べたばかりだ, it has a same meaning of 1st sentence. Indo-European or Chinese ・・・SVO Japanese           ・・・SOV ばかり= just ≠ V(Verb) ∴One more word ...


9

ばかり【bakari】 is a 副助詞 (adverbial particle), which is derived from the 連用形 (-masu stem) of the verb はかる. But the particle (and 連用形 in general) behaves much like a noun. (Join to other noun-like words with の, make into a predicate by adding だ, etc.) Now you essentially have a noun phrase 食べたばかり. To make a sentence out of this, you have to add だ・です (or だった・でした ...


0

That なの or any other のだ forms indicate that information that's accompanied with it is one to complement existing context. (In sentences of statement, it functions as explanation of background for a preceding topic.) In your example, it's probably used in a situation where you reconfirm it after your opponent said that all the sushi there are 100 yen, or so. ...


0

これで can generally be translated as "with this". It's used to indicate the result or conclusion following some action or happening. For example: [今日]{きょう}の[活動]{かつどう}は、これでお[開]{ひら}き。 With this, today's activities come to a close. You can find more of these examples on Jisho's sentence search. For これは and これが, you need to look up the differences ...


0

Very literally speaking, なの consists of a nominal adjective marker な and a nominalizer particle の. This sounds like a roundabout way to say 'is/ is something like', which makes it understandable that it is mainly used by females. When used in a question, the か is sometimes omitted.


3

You filled in "they" in the latter part of the sentence even there is no such word in the original, right? Then naturally you can add an implicit object in the first part, too. When NHK asked them at 73 shelters that are mainly located in Kumamoto, they said... Or if you're uncomfortable with the translation, you can reword it as: As NHK had ...


5

(A) + ないことには + (B) + ない is a fixed construction meaning "not (B) if not (A)" or "not (B) without/unless (A)". 実際に選んでみないことにはわからないのだ。 I don't understand it unless I actually choose it. JGram has many examples of this pattern. (Note: This page contains some examples not related to this pattern. Ignore examples #259 and #5258 for now.) This ~ないことには is ...


9

...ものとする is a legal turn of phrase you frequently find in legal documents, business contracts and legal agreements in such a way: 本契約書は日本の法律に準拠し、日本の法律に従って解釈され、強制されるものとする ー This agreement shall be governed by, and construed and enforced in accordance with the law of Japan. 住所変更の通知は、その到達によって効力が発生するものとする ー Notice of a change of address shall be ...


4

ない can be repeated many times for emphasis (ie. ないないないない… ≒ No, no, no, no, no...) even in ordinary conversations, and it just means "absolutely no/impossible" regardless of whether the number is even or odd. つまんないない is certainly ungrammatical in everyday writings, but since it's a song, I think this just means つまんない (boring), emphasized in a peculiar way ...



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