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-1

The 「たくって」 is an erroneously extended form of 「たくて」 often said by women. It's for emphasis. While it looks like the 「って」 from 「という」, it isn't. As mentioned in the direct comments to your post, the correct lyric is 「かき消す」.


3

だから is sometimes used at the beginning of a sentence when the speaker is trying to emphasize something already said. I've heard it said to me in this usage as "だ〜か〜ら〜". I think you could translate this usage as "Like I said..." To me, here the combination of だから plus 言ったろ (言っただろう) gives a strong feeling that the speaker is annoyed with the other person.


1

I teach Japanese, and have the basic particles pretty well sussed out for teaching purposes. I recently began to take up learning Latin. I had already encountered Korean and the almost but not quite mirror imaging of postpositional particles. But Latin for an English speaker provides the best comparison, but it is most definitely NOT a 1:1 comparison. For ...


1

...なんだから is related to のだ through various processes at work here. There is a simple contraction here, i.e. なんだから -> なのだから. Let's split this phrase up into the individual bits: な+のだ+から. The な is required before using のだ when the preceeding work is a noun or na-adjective; in other words, in sentences that would end in です (だ). This is similar to how ...


0

なんだから is an abbreviated form of なのだから, which contains 「のだ」, so in that sense they are the same. But depending on where you see the のだ, the meaning may be different. For example these two sentences have a different usage of のだ: 食べるのだ and 僕のだ


3

While what I am going to say will not directly answer your question, I think it might help so I decided to post an answer. The link posted by Pleiades above as a comment has a pretty good description of the various causes where は and が are used. The only problem is that there is still a lot of vagueness, and depending on your skill level in Japanese trying ...


3

As both Yuuichi Tam and user4092 have noted in their earlier posts, the pattern for すぎる after -ない can vary. Part of this is because the -ない ending itself has two derivations. One is from the negative 無い. (Historically, it's more complicated, but in modern Japanese, the negative ない suffix is functionally the same as standalone 無い.) The adjective つまらない ...


2

You should understand it as "I'm mad/angry at that person." Like if you say 私に怒らないでよ!you're saying "well don't get mad at me about it!" And the other way around if you say お母さんに怒られた。it means mum got angry at me.


5

I wanted to say "I want to hear Asuka-chan play the piano!" The easiest and most common way to say that would be by nominalizing Asuka's action of playing the piano. How do we do that? It is very simple. First, form a regular sentence meaning "Asuka plays the piano." 「あすかちゃんはピアノを[弾]{ひ}く」 Now, change the 「は」 to 「が」 and add 「の」 at the very end. ...


2

My gut feeling is that the cause of your confusion is the true transitivity of the idiomatic expression 「[腹]{はら}が[立]{た}つ」. You already seem to know it is intransitive in Japanese, but you rightly translated it as if it were transitive -- "things which make me angry". Of course, you could have translated 「腹の立つこと」 as "things that I get angry over" or the ...


1

たら is a hypothetical particle similar to ば and なら, however it carries a different nuance. As you can probably infer from how the past tense is used (eg 読んだら 食べたら 使ったら), it implies that the action is already completed. Looking at your sentence, はさみを使ったら、 元の所に戻しておいてください。 Comparing it to the given translation, it is accurate. A more literal translation ...


0

For completeness, I'll mention one other way to say "to start ~". You can use verb (pre-masu) + 出す. For example: 彼は走り出した He started to run. 雨が急に降り出した。 It suddenly started raining. However, I think the usage of this is much more limited than 〜はじめる. See this post where a Japanese person talks about a special nuance of "食べ出す" Also, ...


3

Here し is the pre-masu form of する, and equivalent to a slightly more formal form of "して". Here is another example of this usage: 彼はりんごを手に取り、食べ始めた。 He took the apple into his hand and began to eat it. In this sentence 取り can be replaced with 取って, though the former sounds a bit more formal to me. For the second question、であった is simply the past ...


4

し is 連用形 form of する.It joins the two sentences here. であった is past form of copula である. So the translated sentence will be like "The games in ancient times were magical rituals which involved predicting the future of a person or king and deciding their fate."


8

Dictionaries say すぎる in this meaning is placed: after the 連用形 of a verb, like 動きすぎる after the stem of an i-adjective, like やさしすぎる and after the stem of a na-adjective, like しずかすぎる. つまらない is an adjective so I think つまらなすぎる is natural.  Generally, when すぎる is placed after ない: in the case of the adjective ない, it uses さ, like なさすぎる as you say in the case ...


1

The rule is that さ intermediates when the word stem consists of only one mora (e.g. な as in ない and よ as in よい). The stem of つまらない is つまらな, which consists of 4 moras, therefore the orthodox one is つまらなすぎる. That said, つまらなさすぎる is also accepted in practice. (edit: Some people probably find it wrong.) As for preference, I find both of them almost as frequent ...


4

「[私]{わたし}は[警察官]{けいさつかん}に[犬]{いぬ}にひったくりを[噛]{か}ませて[欲]{ほ}しい。」 is correct if I have to choose between "correct" and "incorrect". A little more natural-sounding word order IMHO would be: 「私は警察官に、ひったくりを犬に噛ませて欲しい。」 for clarity reasons. Cramming the phrase 「AにBに」 into the same part of a sentence is not such a great idea even though it is still ...


3

Those are what I might call the "conjunctive filler phrases", which often add very little, if at all, in the way of meaning but somehow help create a softening effect (a good rhythm) that native speakers tend to instinctively "seek" in spoken Japanese. We use so many of those in spontaneous spoken language. A fairly comprehensive list can be found here. ...


3

「[如]{ごと}く」 is an auxiliary verb, not an adverb, but since it is in the [連用形]{れんようけい}, it functions adverbially. (The dictionary form is 「如し」, of course.) 「~~の如く」 means 「~~のように」, expressing how similar one thing is to another. 「山は[禿]{は}げ山の如く[訪]{おとず}れたモノを[食]{く}らうだろう」 = "The mountain, just like a bald mountain, will devour all who visit it." ...


4

「うん、もうすぐ[寝]{ね}るから。」 「から」 here is used like a sentence-ending particle, and that is one very common usage of the word in informal speech. We use 「から」 this way to make an announcement and see how the other person would react. More often than not, the speaker simply expects that reaction to be along the lines of 「わかった」、「それならいい」、etc. In other words, this ...


0

で (de) usually means "at" in English...kind of.. Think of "at" meaning the same as "because" like: "The answer to your problem is (AT) this cause." "We found what was (AT) the root of the problem." etc. ato de = later. Not in a different place, but AT a different time or situation. (Unless you consider time a fourth directional dimension, but that's ...


4

Yes, for example... ~ておいで -> ~といで e.g. 持っておいで -> 持っといで ~ておくれ -> ~とくれ e.g. 来ておくれ -> 来とくれ (← might be Edo/Tokyo dialect) Yes, for example... ~でしまう -> ~じまう (でし→じ) e.g. 死んでしまう -> 死んじまう (→ often contracted to 死んじゃう) ~てしまう -> ~ちまう (てし→ち) e.g. やってしまう -> やっちまう (→ often contracted to やっちゃう) ~てあげる -> ~たげる (てあ→た) e.g. 買ってあげる -> 買ったげる ~であげる -> ...


3

"1. Can the てお -> と shortcut be used for contexts other than ておく (for example: お世話になっております -> おせわになっとります)?" The なっております-to-なっとります contraction does happen dialectally. You will hear it many times daily in Central Japan and Kansai. I am sure that it is used in many other parts of Western Japan as well. Around Tokyo, you will rarely hear it used. When ...


9

「猫は蛇が現れたと思た.」 This sentence is good except for the last word and the non-Japanese period. Excellent use of 「は」 and 「が」. 「[猫]{ねこ}は[蛇]{へび}が[現]{あらわ}れたと[思]{おも}った。」 is the corect sentence. Other possibilities: 「猫はヘビが[出]{で}てきたのかと思った。」 「猫はヘビが出てきたと思った。」 「猫はヘビが現れたのかと思った。」


5

Your sentence looks fine except that 思た should be [思]{おも}った. 


4

ゲームの歴史、それははるか5,000年の昔、古代エジプトにまでさかのぼるという。 "The history of games goes way back to ancient Egypt about 5000 years ago." Something about this sentence feels a bit clipped to me. But nevertheless, "さかのぼる" is a great word that more or less means to go upstream, against the flow of the river. But in this context, its meaning is to reach back, figuratively, ...


5

楽しい is an い-adjective meaning "fun". In Japanese, there's nothing wrong with saying "I'm having fun." But generally you're not going to presume to know the psychological state of someone else. 楽しそう is formed by dropping い and adding そう, forming a な-type adjective meaning, "appearing to be having fun". So the sentence ...


6

によって vs 次第で There are many ways to describe the difference between them. Let me give a picture first. X 次第 could be explained like "depending on how X acts/becomes", or typically the cause-effect relationship is unknown, or by chance, or the result that is brought about is not clear from the first impression of X or hard to explain beforehand, or the ...


2

「うん」「そうですか」など色々ありますが translates with an implied subject of あいづちをうつ」ということ could be translated as There are various kinds of aizuchi such as "un" and "sou desu ka" The という意味...という意味ではありません part is contrasting what aizuchi are and aren't. So, it's saying [aizuchi] convey the sense of "yes, I'm following you", not the sense of "I agree with you". タイミングよく ...


8

Q1: Is there any difference between しだいで and 次第で, the former seeming a little softer and childish (if at all I can consider しだい as childish)? Sometimes writing in kanji is called 閉じる and writing in hiragana is called 開く. There are no strict official rules on how to write something in kanji or in kana. This decision is difficult even for native speakers ...


2

I'll try to cover the triple-は part of the question. 俺はもう蕎麦屋には行かないから、千晶さんは安心して行っていいよ。 The basic structure here is Sentence 1 から Sentence 2. The first は marks the subject of the verb 行く 俺はもう行かない "I won't go any more" The third は marks the subject that applies to the verbs 安心して行く 千晶さんは安心して行っていいよ "You can go [there] freely." I ...


5

Here, "なんの” is an abbreviation for "なるの”. There are other cases where る is abbreviated as ん, like in "ここにいんの?” (for "ここにいるの?”). Since "気まずい" means something like "become embarrassed" or "feel awkward", you could translate that portion as: まあ、気まずくなんのだけはやめような Well, at least try not too feel so awkward Also, having multiple は's in a sentence is not ...


1

In the sentence Honne o motomeru is o/wo (を) the correct particle to use? Yes. What particle should I use with “motomeru”? The reason why "を" is the correct particle for your example clause, is because "求める" is a transitive verb, and "本音" is the object. In addition to transitive verbs, there are intransitive verbs. Usually you can either find ...


3

「[方]{ほう}」 has several different meanings and it seems that you are trying to apply one meaning of it to the 「方」 in this context where it is used for another. To be more specific, you are clearly thinking of the "comaparison 方" as in "A rather than B", are you not? In this context, 「方」 is used to mean "the side" as in doers vs. on-lookers. Tousaka is ...


1

私は無理です may be colloquially passable, but is logically incorrect, because you are saying “I am impossible” or “I am impossibility.” Clearly you are not “impossible” entity. 私には無理です means (そのことを行うのは)私には(私にとっては) 無理(なこと)です‐“It’s impossible (or difficult) for me (to do it), “ and sounds perfect to me. Japanese language is pretty loose in distinguishing noun and ...


1

I am actually not sure if "僕は無理です” is technically incorrect grammar. I can imagine a group of people talking about whether that would ever climb a mountain, and one of them says "僕は。。。。やっぱり無理です”. As "〜は” can mean "as for ~", I don't see a major difference in meaning between 僕は and 僕には in this case. I would be interested to hear from any native speakers to ...


1

I think you've answered it yourself: に gives the sense of "for". Consider "For me, it's impossible" vs. "Me, I'm [figuratively] impossible."


2

I looked up Tepra (テプラ) on google images and its a handheld machine makes something like nameplates on the go. Please correct if I am wrong! Anyway, this usage of でしたか is as straight-forward as it gets: past tense of です + question particle か. Listing consecutive items using か gives a " [this] or [that]" list, like in your example. ...


1

Your understanding looks good. The 「た」 in 「~~た[方]{ほう}が」 expresses a conditional state, not a past event. It is just like how you say in English "If I had ~~", "If there were ~~", etc. You are not talking about past events when you use these conditionals. Occasionally, though, you will encounter a situation where a native speaker might use the present ...


2

First of all the tense in Japanese is different from English, and the verbal auxiliary た represents past and completion. As your teacher says, "来月、富士山に行った時、富士山を見たいです" is natural. I think this た doesn't mean "past" but "completion". This た can be used for a future thing. For example, 来週の金曜日に、仕事が終わったら、お酒を飲みましょう (Let's drink after work next Friday).


2

I feel that generally speaking ~によって and ~次第で have a very similar meaning. On this page you can see a post which discusses these where someone comments that ~次第で has a more stiff/formal feeling. While I wouldn't say that ~によって is exactly the most informal word (It expresses a higher level concept that I don't think children would use too often), I agree that ...


2

The は particle is frequently when expressing negative things, not just in the case of "ではない" (じゃない) but in a form like form "XはYがない". While there is some nuance difference, I think for the most part "には意味がない”,"では意味がない”, and "は意味がない” have a similar meaning. You can do a web search and see that they are all used in similar situations. However, in the ...


5

First, Group III is the easiest to devide because 来{く}る and する are the only verbs that belong to it. These verbs have each irregular conjugation as you probably know. Then, if the verb ends with another than ''る'', it belongs to Group I. For example, you can tell which group 行{い}く belongs to, because it ends with ''く'' which is another than ''る''. Yes, ...


5

I wanted to add on to 変幻出没's post by clarifying the Group I (godan) verb exceptions - not only do they end in る, they all end in える and いる, but are actually Group I rather than Group II (ichidan). (Not to say that Japanese should be studied purely for the JLPT, but this information is relevant to your N4 studies: there are a finite number of Group I ...


-1

You don't need to know what 'group' a verb is in. That's a completely abstract way to think about verbs that is just a made up construct used to explain things in an academic setting. It really slows you down if you have to stop mid sentence to think about what 'group' a verb is in. Instead you want to be able to recognize it on the subconscious level and ...


6

Japanese verbs can be divided into three groups (godan verbs, ichidan verbs and irregular verbs). Nevertheless, the -ます form is not the best to tell them apart. Godan verbs (Group I) ends in く、ぐ、う、ぶ、る、ぬ、つ、む、す. Examples are: 行{い}く、泳{およ}ぐ、買{か}う、遊{あそ}ぶ、上{あ}がる、死{し}ぬ、待{ま}つ、読{よ}む、話{はな}す. There is some overlapping with verb ending in る.I mean that you have to ...


4

「でしか」is simply the で particle combined with the しか particle. The で particle here indicates an instrument or method used to carry out the main action (特殊召喚 in this case). It can be roughly translated as "with" or "using". Thus,「融合召喚で」can be translated to "using fusion summon" or something similar. The しか particle means "only". It can be added onto other ...


-1

Watch this video by learn japanese from zero.. he explains it very well. https://youtu.be/idbZn4F9Q5A Its not my video and Im not claiming ownership ^^


4

All the sentences but the last one are correct. It should be BがAを踏んだところは足だ. (器官 sounds too anatomical.)


7

「ここまで[捜]{さが}していないとなると、[後]{あと}は[道場]{どうじょう}か[土蔵]{どぞう}ぐらいなものだろう。」 In the phrase 「捜していない」 in this context, It is Person A who is 捜している (searching), and it is Person B who is いない (not there). The above was your (only) mistake, but since it was a big one, it cost you the rest of the sentence. One more thing. 「ここまで」 here means more like "to this ...



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