Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

A classic example of unfinished sentences in Japanese. You can make better sense with some brackets: 「 どのような状況下であっても必ず十分な結果を 」 と思い必死に過ごした3か月でした。 Can be translated something like: It was frantic 3 months I spent to get the result, thinking "No matter what the cirsumstances are, I will..."


4

Is しかねる valid for politely giving this type of "excuse" for why you can't do something? 出来かねる or 致しかねる is better. and I think, it's better not to mention about the detailed reason. Can できない also be used for politely giving this type of "excuse" for why you can't do something? (e.g., "電話で対応できませんが…") Yes. If neither of these are ...


5

A verb and symbols are omitted in this sentence. Read it like this: 「どのような状況下であっても、必ず十分な結果を(出したい)」と思い、 必死に過ごした3か月でした。


1

You technically can split である and place a topic or something in between, but this is really very unusual (with one exception, which I'll mention in a moment). 「犬で私はある」 is technically possible, but is rare enough to be quite noticeable - it places a strong focus on the predicate noun (犬 here), which is further amplified by the rarity of the construction. You ...


3

Most likely the original text should be: 交換プログラムに選ばれるのが難しいかやさしいかは which means "whether it is difficult or easy" But somehow か turned into a が. This commonly occurs when I scan documents and convert them with OCR software.


2

Adjectives (and relative clauses for that matter) are always before the noun they modify. I don't know if there are rules for the ordering of adjective groups. Maybe Wikipedia can tell you more. As for the I understand nothing at all part: Wikipedia can help you on "sentence topic"; "time" refers to time expressions such as "three hours ago", "yesterday", ...


3

I think I've figured out what you are asking about. Mental adjective + さ can refer to one's feeling as well as quality invokes the emotion. I'm not sure I'm able to tell their difference using English words, but you can paraphrase it with 〜と思う気持ち when it means the feeling. Maybe what you encountered was this kind of usage, where in this case 愛しさ = 愛しいと思う気持ち ...


1

Ah, I see what you're asking. The particle も can indeed be used in a similar manner to the English also, e.g. 子供{こども}の時{とき}、あまりゲームをしなかった。 今もゲームをしない (When I was a child, I didn't really play games. I also don't really play games now). But there isn't really a way to contract also into 何 in the same manner of 何も (nothing) 何か (something). If you wish to say ...


3

I would go with "他に" 'What also goes well with this dress?'→このドレスに合うものは他に何がある? 'What also never dies?→死なないのは、他に何がある? As mentioned in a comment above, this is more of a "what else" as opposed to a "what also."


-1

Darius' example above is right. But, you can also use KOTO as follows. Anyone, please correct me if the below translations are wrong. かのじょ たち は 日本 ご を べんきょう した こと が あり. - She (all) HAD DONE the thing of studying Japanese. かれ の かお は 見た こと が あり ます. - I HAD DONE the thing of looking at his face. MP 3 プレーヤー を つかった こと が あり ます か? - HAD you DONE (did you do) the ...


1

uchi-ni inu-ga imasu (家に犬がいます) and inu-ga uchi-ni imasu (犬が家にいます) sounds, to me at least, the same. It's very commonly the case in Japanese that you can rearrange words and construct virtually the same sentence. Personally, I would say "uchi ni inu ga imasu". They both seem like statements of facts. If you were asked directly, "Where is the dog?" (犬はどこ?) you ...


5

日本語の名詞を修飾する時、「が」しか使えないでしょう? これは完全に正確だと言えません。連体修飾句では、一般的には「が」が使われていますが、「は」も可能です:あれは[私には役に立たない]方法だ。こういう場合には、「は」が対比を表します。 以上の文の意味は違うのでしょう?? 注釈は間違ってはいませんが、他の意味も可能です。 簡単に言うと、両文に二つの構造があります。その上に、「は」も「が」も複数の意味を持っています。主語が決まっているわけでもありません。したがって、意味はたくさんあります。 文1構造1:あなたは[(○が)何をしているか]を知っている。  普通の「は」:"You know what (you/I/he/she/X) is doing."  ...


5

This is a colloquial contraction of 〜てやがる+んだ, from 〜て+いやがる+のだ. Holden thinks that his brother is a big phony because he has a Jaguar, and he's expressing his negative attitude toward that with 〜てやがる.


3

The bad news-は we don't really have an effective way to distinguish them. The good news-は in fact you don't have to distinguish them. The particle は's function could be loosely described as "singling out one thing you and me know as the current focus", that is, every usage theoretically carries contrastive overtones, as long as it has possible competitors ...


2

My suggestion is to keep using は and that is the most natural way that I can think of as a native Japanese speaker. The description of は and が by Kuno (1973) is widely used. Kuno (1973) mentions は indicates the known information and が indicates the unknown information but it is actually similar to distinguish a/an and the in English for instance if English ...


0

There is a small set of quasi-noun idioms made of question words + も, which roughly means "every-X". Since they are nouns, they can theoretically put any kind of postpositions after them. But actually they are only used with が, less often に or を, and sometimes の (except for いつも, which is a full-fledged noun). Who: 誰{だれ}も, 誰{だれ}もかも, 誰{だれ}も彼{かれ}も "everybody" ...


3

Overview These words have their own meanings, only being alike when translated into English. Those other than だろう(と/が) don't convey any politeness or formality by themselves. The "regardless of whether" sense is shared by: でも and だろうが. (but the best choice is であるかにかかわらず, I think.) The "even if" could be shared by: でも, すら and さえ. だろう(と/が) vs. the others ...


4

「をもって」 couldn't be used with the tools which directly takes effect, but with methods or something helps achieve purpose where the linkage is perceived abstractly. Your third example, 森田さんは新開発の薬をもって病気を克服したのである。 means the new medicine cured his/her disease, thus unacceptable. In contrast, 森田さんは人一倍の努力をもって病気を克服したのである。 only mentions how his/her state ...


1

"なったら" is correct, because "なったら" describes conditions, on the other hand "なると" describes subsequent events. 信号{しんごう}があおに(    )、道{みち}を渡{わた}っていいです。 "いいです" means "allow" or "feel free to do", so the former half of this sentence imposes a condition to be able to cross the road. You can make a choice freely whether you cross the road or not. "なると" means ...


4

You can only use なったら, not なると. First, take a look at this topic, and you see how they exactly describe the difference of と and たら. と, ば: The main clause must be a constant non-volitional reaction to the conditional clause unless the conditional clause shows state or if the subjects of the two clauses differ. ~たら 1. Use when expressing a one-off ...


1

Your recognition is totally right. Here are some examples and differences. もらいました 私{わたし}は父{ちち}から傘{かさ}をもらいました。 (I got an umbrella from my father.) You can see that the subject is 私 (I) and もらいました can be applied for this case. This sentence can imply that the person 私 asked his father to give an umbrella for him/her in several cases. くれました ...


1

There's definitely a nuance, but most people will probably use whichever without giving it a second thought. 謝らなくてもいいよ It's ok, you don't have to say sorry. The nuance is that there could be a reason to apologize, but there was no bad intention so you are forgiven / I forgive you. For example: Aさん is apologizing to Bさん for something she did, but ...


2

People learning Japanese get all caught up in polite language by twisting odd sounding honourific English to make it seem like it's at the same level of politeness as Japanese, like "I humble receive you allowing me to do that". From now on, think of いただきます as simply meaning "get" or "have" as in "getting someone to do something nice for you", because that's ...


1

An expression like "~させます" or "~させしめる (this expression is a little archaic)" are called "使役表現【しえきひょうげん】" in Japanese. Usually, "使役表現" is translated into "Subject make/have/get Object Verb~" For example. Translation "すぐに なおさせますので もうしわけありませんが,もうしばらくおまちください" into Japanese like this. I apologize for being late and having you waiting. I'm making the person ...


1

The form The sentence, そうさせていただきます, is a typical example of use of 謙譲語{けんじょうご} (humble language). Translation Let's make the Speaker2's sentence a normal form. (Earlier step is politer.) Step 1. では、そうさせていただきます。 Step 2. では、そうさせてもらいます。 Step 3. では、そうします。 Step 4. なら、そうする。 So, these sentences can be translated like: Speaker1: You can go for a meal ...


3

As in 非回答者's comment above, a general exposition on わけ and というわけ is quite hard to give, considering the highly abstract and polysemous nature of both わけ and という, as well as the labyrinth of adnominal modification of Japanese, and everything else. So focus on your post: Can we omit 「という」 here? According to your example, we can only have the ...


1

Yes. みたい is usually about your perception or opinion. らしい conveys indirect information that you heard, saw or read somewhere. みたい ~ looks like Used when you think (subjectively) something looks or is like so. Used very often. お母{かあ}さんは怒{おこ}っているみたいだ。 彼{かれ}のことを好{す}きになってしまったみたいだ。 そのチケットは売{う}り切{き}れてしまったみたいだ。 らしい ~ appears to be, seems that, I ...


2

Yes, all of the forms are correct and interchangeable for meaning. Other possible forms include よりほかない and ほか(or より)しかたがない. Colloquially and informally, you can also use っきゃない though it is heard mostly in Kanto -- やるっきゃない、いくっきゃない, etc.


2

Quite simply, 「~~してはならない」 = "You must not ~~." 「~~しなくてはならない」 = "You must ~~." 「ただしいじょうほうにもとづいてはっぴょうしなくてはならない。」 means: "One must make a/the presentation based on correct information." 


3

Even though I think your Japanese sentence has been rewritten by someone IIRC, it is actually much better and, more importantly, more natural than the other answerers have made it seem like. We do actually say something close to that when we do not know where to go at all in a place like City Hall or any larger place with many sections, rooms, staff ...


-1

Other answers have already said your sentence is not very natural, but I think the problem is more basic than this: it's simply no use trying to construct literal translations of what you might say in English in a similar situation. Actually, I can't really understand your example in English, unless we assume it is part of a longer sentence: "Excuse me, ...


1

Hearsay seems correct, but for self deduction with ~ない and い adjectives you have to remove the trailing い and add さそうだ ふらなさそうだ Here is a chart showing the comparison between the two (taken from Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar) While it doesn't directly include it in the chart, the negative forms are implicitly included under the い-adjectives. That ...


4

This 「は」 is used for emphasis and in the sentence in question, it is emphasizing the fact that the vase is indeed rather expensive. It is used in the forms of: 1) [連用形]{れんようけい} of a verb or i-adjective + 「は」 + 「ある/ない/いる/いない, etc.」 and 2) Particle て or で + 「は」 + 「ある/ない/いる/いない, etc.」 「この[花瓶]{かびん}は[高]{たか}くはあるが、それだけの[値打]{ねう}ちはある。」, therefore, means ...


2

These two examples sound kind of weird, so let me add a particle も to make them sound natural and understandable. A. 君の声が聞こえなくても逢えると信じる。 B. 君の声が聞こえなくても、逢えると信じる。 Now the two meanings: (I believe) I can meet you without hearing your voice. I believe without hearing your voice (that I can meet you). I think in most cases B means 2. But I ...


2

That sentence seems to be a mixture of two "discourses". Direct discourse: 桐原さんが言うには、「施設での生活に不慣れなお前のため、彼を専属のサポート役として使ってくれ」とのこと。 Indirect discourse: 桐原さんが言うには、施設での生活に不慣れな俺のため、彼を専属のサポート役として使ってほしいとのこと。 And there is also another problem, which is that, お前のため/俺のため doesn't match 使ってくれ/使ってほしい for its consequence. These two problems are making the ...


3

Punctuation is deceptive. The overall structure is that 「桐原さんが言うには、~てくれ、とのこと。」 surrounds the inner clause 「施設での生活に不慣れな俺のため、彼を専属のサポート役として使う」. It's similar to false word separation as in "eighth grader" and "New Yorkers", which don't mean "the eighth person who grade" and "new people from York". So a more or less literal translation can be given as: What ...


0

Because translating a whole sentence is prohibited here (in what I understand), instead I will leave some fragments of words below. So, please try putting them together into a sentence. ~てみる = try to ~ / start by ~ing まとめる = to summarize こと = things ~なければならない = have to / must やる = to do (almost equivalent to する) [必]{かなら}ず = invariably / without ...


0

Note: This all depends on who you are meeting. What is your relationship? What is your reason for going to this office? Business Japanese is very much situational. These types of details really need to be considered. Now, here is a general scenario. Let's say you are vising company XYZ and it is located inside a combined office building. First, you ...


1

It's hard to get over, especially since Japanese is such a soft/roundabout language, but when asking for things (like directions, time, etc.) the colloquial way to do it is rather blunt. ○○はどこですか? ○○はどちらでしょうか? 今何時ですか? A社は何階でしょうか? If you need to soften it, prepend with a すみません. Don't forget to say thanks when it's done. Voila. The concept of adding "do ...


0

If I understand your question, you just don't know usage of ~~してみた . ~~してみた is very popular on internet recently, you could find ダンスしてみた, 歌ってみた. this form can be converted into した, so まとめてみた is simply まとめた, summarized. してみた makes past verb and also has nuance of tried to do, but personally I think the nuance is "tried, but less effort. actually i enjoyed." ...


3

The definition in Goo thesaurus seems a bit confusing. In the もうかるどころじゃない example, of course the speaker generally understands that making a profit is important. ("Making a profit is unimportant" is もうかることは重要じゃない) (noun / plain form of a verb / plain form of an adjective) + どころじゃない is used in three ways: Specifies something is totally wrong. The fact is ...


-1

As you may have guessed, それどころじゃない is a どころじゃない attached to a pronoun それ. It expresses that there is some more important issue than the topic the other speaker is talking about (which is referred to with それ), and that he/she doesn't have enough remaining capacity to spare for the other speaker's topic. どうして電話をくれなかったんだ? 車が事故っちゃってそれどころじゃなかったんだよ。 ※事故る = ...


4

毎【ごと】に means "every", so 2日ごとに is "every second day". On the other hand, X置【お】きに literally means "leaving (an amount of time/space/...) X (between each occurence)". It comes from the verb 置く, "to put", "to place", "to leave (sth. somewhere)". Here is an article from NHK's 身近なことばの疑問にお答えします about ごとに and おきに. So how come おきに sometimes means the same as ...


3

I don't know if this answers your question but I would say them as: 昨日、テスト勉強(を)しているときに、彼女が来た。 Yesterday she came (to my place) while I was studying for a test. 昨夜、あなたが電話してきたとき、私は勉強していた。 I was studying when you called me last night. 私達がその本のことを初めて話したときには、もう私は一週間それを読んでいた。 By the time we first talked about that book, I had already been ...


2

森、平原、峡谷、湖・・・。 This is a simple listing of nouns. It's not a complete sentence, and there's no grammatical role to mark, so they aren't missing any particles—though if it helps you make sense of it, you could insert a listing particle of some sort after each noun, like と or や. In this case, や might fit better (the ellipsis suggests that the list ...


1

I'm generally pretty strict on these kinds of questions, but considering that this particular block of text is kind of dense and hard to understand, I'll offer some help in parsing it. I'll break it apart bit by bit. ポーランドのプロニスクで生まれ Born in ~ Poland パレスチナ移住後はユダヤ系住民のイギリス軍への参加を呼びかけると共に After emigrating to Palestine, he called for all Jewish ...



Top 50 recent answers are included