New answers tagged

1

First, I would have to mention this even though it is not part of your question. The 「[私]{わたし}は[果物]{くだもの}、」 part at the beginning sounds very unnatural and almost ungrammatical even in the context of very casual speech. It would need to be changed to: 「果物(で)は、」 「(私は)果物の中で(or 中では)」 ← The personal pronoun is not necessary. It sounds more natural without. ...


3

Here 騎 is used as a generic counter for "fighters". Originally, 騎 is a counter for cavalries, and using 騎 to actually count cavalries is of course rare these days. But idiomatic words like 一騎打ち or 一騎当千 are still very common today. Probably the author had 一騎当千 in his mind, and thought it was nice to use the counter 騎 to describe this situation. I can't say it'...


1

I fear this is less an answer by itself (you have received two very good ones already), but rather a strongly related aside. Most materials for Japanese language learners take a one-size-fits-all approach that roughly equates to "favor immediate (safe) usability (= production)". This is why nearly all common text books teach ~ます first instead of teaching ...


1

Besides the function you mentioned, it can also prompt the listener to take somewhat proper action. In this context, it can imply that you want him/her to listen to consequence of the story. In that sense, you can naturally use it.


2

First we have to make a distinction between 日本語教育 and 国語教育 (which follows 学校文法). In 日本語教育 the te-form always includes the て/で part. In 国語教育 the te-form is not recognized, as it is just considered to be a perverse version of the 連用形 and not an actual newly developed form. I think there are two reasons: Simplification of the grammar 「て形」を独立した活用形の一つと考えると、「...


2

As you showed in the chart, The pre-ます-form is regular 五段動詞の連用形 The pre-て-form is(五段動詞の連用形)+(音便) So I think it is a correct and helpful distinction from a phrase-production perspective. Especially for learners asking questions like, "How do I say 'He is eating an apple'?" But Japanese grammarians are likely more considered with the 音便 itself from ...


-1

Generally speaking に is used to mark a place in space or time, you'll want to use の in 家族の中で. i-adjectives(形容詞) are followed immediately by a noun, therefore 高い誰ですか which is followed by a "question word" is not grammatically correct. If you want to be polite use this: 御家族で最も背の高い方はどなたでしょうか? if not, the answer above is best.


1

向こうに大きなビルが見えます。 "The big building is visible over there." "The big building over there is visible." From my experience, there is no problem with either of these translations. Although 「向こうにある大きなビルが見えます」is probably better. Here are a couple others which might be natural in context... "(You) can see a big building on the other side." "(There is) a big ...


6

It's impossible to parse it as a relative clause because there is only one verb/adjective (ie, 見えます) in the whole sentence. As a rule, each sub-clause must have a verb/adjective. So the real question is: "Which word this 向こうに modifies?" 向こうに can only modify a verb, and 向こうの modifies a noun. Both can be translated as "over there" in English, but you need to ...


0

「子供を死なせる」 means to "allow", or "cause" the death of this child. So 「事故で子供を死なせてしまった母親」 would mean something like: the mother who caused (her) child's death in an accident The mother is the subject. The child is the object. The mother is the one who causes the child's death. If you put the 使役{しえき} of 「死ぬ」 into 受身{うけみ} it would look like this: 死なせる ⇒ ...


1

向こう is grammatically a noun, so the sentence you have can really only be parsed as AにBがする → (向こう)に(大きなビル)が(見える). If you want it to be parsed as in your second translation, I think you have no choice but to choose something like 向こうにある(あの)大きなビルが見える.


0

Like in your example, 「そういえば、昨日、東京に行ったよ」 This よ sounds very natural because You're talking to a friend. (where よ is very unlikely to be impolite) You're introducing new information into the conversation. It's using よ when talking to people you don't know, or anyone socially above you could easily be considered presumptive and impolite. (best to ...


1

I take your quote. ”メーラーの設定によってクリックのみでは正しく開けない場合があります” as; Depending on the setting on the part of the mail sender, there is a case that you cannot open the file simply by clicking (the mouse). 1.“みで” should be “のみで” meaning “only by (clicking). 2."正しく開けない" means “unable to open (the file) properly. "メーラー" should be “mailer / mail sender.”


2

I think as a general rule you don't often want to use よ when answering a question unless you think your answer will surprise the person asking the question. However, in your example about Tokyo, you are not asking a direct question, so I think it's better to use よ when you speak about the (surprising) thing you did. Removing よ from that sounds oddly neutral ...


5

The second sentences here are not indirect instructions. The first sentences are direct commands. The second sentences describe the resulting situation. Sensei: 作文を書きなさい。 "Write a composition!" Indirect >> 先生は学生に作文を書かせました。 "The teacher made the students write a composition." Shachou: 鈴木課長、上村くんの世話をしてくれ。 "Suzuki-kacho, take good ...


1

レアメタル is indeed "rare metal" (or rare earth), and どうたら/どうたらこうたら is like "blah-blah", "such-and-such", "you-know-what". It's used in place of an obvious and/or unimportant part. The following questions are related. What does うんたらかんたら mean? The phrase うんやらかんやら? So "レアメタルがどうたら" means "rare metals are blah blah blah" And in case you didn't know, phones ...


7

「みで」is not the expression your looking for. That part of the sentence should be parsed クリック のみ では - "by only clicking" You're on the right track. By changing 正しい to 正しく it becomes an adverb, so you get 正しく開けない - "can't correctly open" メーラー is probably "mailer", perhaps you mistook the first kana?


2

これは道路の上に作られた細い溝と、その上を通るタイヤによって作られるのだが、制限速度で走らないと音楽らしい音楽に聞こえない。 This was created from the narrow gutter which lay upon the road and the tires which passed above it, but it didn't sound like music unless the car was going the speed limit. ところが、その数はあまり増えなかった。それはメロディーロードからの音楽が騒音の元になるかもしれないという理由で、ほとんどが街中から離れたところに作られたからである。 However, they had never built ...


6

「来年【らいねん】日本へ行【い】くと言いました」 can mean (but is not limited to): I said I will go to Japan next year. He/she said he/she will go to Japan next year. I said he/she will go to Japan next year. (ie, I told someone else that he/she will go to Japan) You said you will go to Japan next year. (a bit hard to think of a context where this interpretation is suitable, but ...


4

You have to guess, based on what is most likely the intended meaning. Let's try to translate literally as much as possible and I'll try to demonstrate what I mean... For the two examples that you gave: 日本{にほん}に行{い}ったら日本語{にほんご}を習{なら}う when go to Japan / will learn Japanese トマトやりんごを投{な}げた threw tomatoes and apples In English, these ...


1

Although, I think I do understand the meaning of it In one hour before 8:30 am, when the reservations started No, this sentence means "By 8:30 AM, which is an hour before the registration started, ...". The actual registration starts at 9:30, which is written at the end of the article. Here, の is used as the apposition marker. 友達の田中さん ...


0

Er, I guess my comments wind up being an answer You wanted to say "General statements in English use the plural noun form." You came up with: 英語では一般的な発言は名詞の複数形を使います。 I would suggest: 英語では普遍的な命題は名詞の複数形を使っています。 I cannot guarantee this is correct, but here's why I'd suggest this: "statement" is a word with many meanings. 発言 means an "utterance" ...


0

I think 次第 is being used as a formal and polite way to mention the circumstances or reason for the desire expressed by たい.(頂きたい気持ちが湧いた、その事情のことが「次第」) お誘いいただきたい次第です。 "So I eagerly await your invitation." You could also say, お誘いいただきたいのです。 お誘いいただきたいわけです。 with basically the same meaning, just a little less polite and formal.


-1

You could explain it this way... I like dogs = 犬が好き I like Dog = ドッグという人が好き・「ドッグ」というものが好き(例えば、「ドッグ」というブランドのビール) I love hamburgers = ハンバーグが大好き I love Hamburger = ハンバーガーという人が大好き・ハンバーガーというものが大好き(例えば、「ハンバーガー」という名前の付いているパチンコ屋) 以下はハッタリ話 You may also like to mention that what is most commonly referred to as the "plural" form(複数形)of nouns in English is ...


5

Yes, the sentence is perfectly correct. The auxiliary (助動詞) 「れる/られる」 has four meanings: 「受け身」(passive), 「尊敬」(honorific), 「可能」(potential), and 「自発」(spontaneous). Here in your example, it is used as honorific. 総理大臣はヨーロッパを訪問されたくさんの国々の大統領に会われた。 is not the passive voice, but the honorific speech (尊敬語) of: 総理大臣はヨーロッパを訪問したくさんの国々の大統領に会った。 Which ...


4

You would use の instead of に here (linking two nouns), so 家族の中. You also want to insert a superlative (phrase that means "most"/"best"/#1). One example is 一番(目). There are many others, like もっとも, だれより(も) (less common), etc. So something like: 家族の中で一番背が高い人は誰ですか。 For some basic examples of superlatives, see this page.


3

日本語 もうおっしゃったように 「次の信号を左」、「前の角を右」 云々は、肝要なところが抜けているだけだと存じます。 本来なら完全な文書では、 次の信号を左。。。に曲がります 前の角を右。。。に曲がってください まで言いますが、省略してしまうのが一般的ですね。 下記のように: 「図書館の前を歩く」 「空を飛ぶ」 「曲がる」・「飛ぶ」・「歩く」・「走る」のような「移動性」のある動詞の対象となる語をよく「を」でマークします。 それで、「で」は何故だめなのかについては、勘で言っているだけですが、「で」を移動動詞と使うと、「で」の「手段」を指定する機能を先に考えてしまうからではないでしょうか? 例えば、 道を歩く 道で歩く 道では歩けるが、...


3

They might be confusing, but: 一年後 いちねんご ichinen go — one year after(wards); one year later 一年後 いちねんあと ichinen ato — one year later; one year behind 後一年 あといちねん ato ichinen — one year remaining; one year until (The word あと is written in hiragana more often than not.) So, there are significant differences between them, though I don't deny ...


5

休む{やすむ} is used as both: an intransitive verb meaning "to rest", "take a day off" as in 庭{にわ}で休む{やすむ} a transitive verb meaning "to skip", "take a break from", "be absent from" as in the case of 学校{がっこう}を休む{やすむ} 休む does not have a direct counterpart (with transitive and intransitive usage) in English, however such verbs are quite common. For example you ...


2

I suggest 携帯さえ持ってないほど. Another option is 携帯すら持ってないほど. And 携帯でもないほど doesn't make sense but 携帯もないほど and 携帯だってないほど make sense.


3

Judging from the context you provided, I think it's read as 穿【うが】った, and means "actually carved/engraved on the hand". 穿つ means "to drill", but in this context I feel it's better to translate it as "to carve/engrave" (using something like a chisel/knife, or some similar magical device). The speaker thought those letters were actually carved/engraved on ...


0

[Edit: this answer was based on the original version of the question which had furigana for the うがつ, rather than ほじる, form of 穿った, so is now obsolete] I'm reading it as: ".. it felt like the letters were literally drilling into my hands." That is, 穿つ can mean to pierce/drill/bore. So 手に穿つ is "drill into my hands". Then we can add an adverbial 実際に or ...


1

This looks like the explanatory の (like のだ・のです・んだ・んです). (It is used to mark that the information answers an actual or anticipated question, i.e., "I'm not just saying this just for fun, but to explain something", and tends to have an emphatic effect). However, the following copula is converted to a conjunctive form で so that the usual でもいい form for "it is ...


8

To add to @Locksleyu's answer, 出す in "the continuative form of a verb (動詞の連用形) + 出す" can mean either: ㋐ そうすることによって外や表面に現れるようにする意を表す。「しぼり―・す」「見つけ―・す」 to make something reveal/appear outside or on the surface by doing the action, eg 「しぼり出す」(squeeze out) 「見つけ出す」(find out) or ㋑ その動作を始める意を表す。「降り―・す」「笑い―・す」 to start the action, eg 「降り出す」(start to ...


2

に denotes the target (of your arrogant request) and は is a topic marker, without which the sentence would sound like inversion of "どんなワガママもし放題なのは、こういう時の遠坂にであるが". As your translation, it's fine, and yes, that に is the same as に対して (though you somehow have cut off は).


2

It is optative in meaning even though it grammatically takes the imperative form. This usage is quite common in song lyrics and other fictional writings in Japanese. At least in the Japanese-speaking mind, a person's [想]{おも}い ("feeling(s)", "thought(s)", etc.) has no will and it cannot fly away ([飛]{と}んでゆく) to someone; therefore, you do not order your 想い ...


2

[Edit: Note, this answer was intended to be a complete answer to the initial version of the question - however the question has undergone a major edit so this answer only partially answers the question.] The overall theme is "good and bad ways for people to refuse requests" (eg from their employers). The connection between the first two paragraphs is that ...


1

The difference is the subject of the verb. The person you are talking to is the subject of くれて, where you would be the subject for もらって. Because you are thanking the person for the help that they gave you it makes sense for them to be the subject, and so くれて is used. It's comparable to the difference between "you did something for me" and "I got you to do ...


5

「[先生]{せんせい}が[私]{わたし}にみんなに[手伝]{てつだ}うよう[言]{い}うよう言った。 」 Everytime you see a verb, you need to figure out what the subject for that verb is. The verbs used here are: 「手伝う」,「言う」 and 「言った」. Follow me so far? Now, who does each of the three actions? (And which one of the three is the main verb of the sentence?) The main verb is easy to spot in Japanese ...


1

The second one, because there are two よう's and two possible speaker-listener pairs (先生、私) and (私、みんな) where a speaker tells a listener "something along the lines of" X. That is, here AがBにXよう言う is roughly "A tells B do something like X". With three parties, (unless people are talking to themselves) those are the only two pairings that make sense, which ...


-1

ふたつの思い is probably the (poetically delayed) intended subject of 飛んでゆけ. I previously incorrectly stated that it is being used as an imperative (please see l'électeur's answer for why it is optative - I have tweaked the wording to fit an optative mood but maintained the position that the thoughts (as opposed to the singer) are what will travel towards the ...


2

This phenomenon is called ら抜き ("omitting ら"). The two forms mean exactly the same. Grammatically, ichidan verbs like 食べる have a potential form 食べられる instead of 食べれる, as you already know. But in recent times, people (especially young) have started saying 食べれる anyway despite its ungrammatical status. Removing ら only works for potential, not passive. Without ...


5

In your example 救い is not an adjective, but rather the pre-masu form of 救う, "to save". The grammar is the normal pattern of "pre-masu form" + "出す". However, rather than thinking of 救い出す as meaning "to start to save", I think it's better to just think of it as a separate verb, as shown in the dictionary. Based on this dictionary definitions, it mostly means ...


3

ちょっと遅れてもよければ、だいじょうぶだ I imagine something like the following having taken place before B reported to A: B: 鈴木さん、今日、仕事終わったら飲みに行けそう? 鈴木: う~ん、行くんだったらちょっと遅くなりそうな予感なんだけど… それでもよければ、はい、大丈夫です。 (Addressing someone by family name sounds overly formal in English; let's pretend his name is Bob) B: Hey Bob, you think you're going to be able to grab some drinks with us ...


0

〇〇を目的に(して)〇〇する. The して is often omitted. This is just a variant of the very common AをBにする pattern. You can't remove both; the basic clause is 物語りはない where は is the negative collocating version for contrast (there are many types of stories, but few such as this). The second one can be removed without changing the meaning much; it just adds a little extra ...


0

を in を目的に indicate a object for 目的, it is 力石徹を殴り倒すことだけ in this case. I think first and second は are a topic maker and third one is emphasis. You can remove the emphasis は and first は but you had better not to remove second は. I don't know the reason. I think it is no problem it is comma.


5

精一杯 means both "eager / doing one's best" and "at best / all one can do". 「教えてもらう」という姿勢が精一杯だった ... is an ambiguous expression which can mean either: one was so "eagerly passive", and did their best in order to be taught (精一杯 = "eagerly". "精一杯に消極的" is a sarcastic expression) all one could do was showing the attitude of "I will learn from you" (精一杯 = "...


2

As someone commented, I think the meaning of this is clear: "The letter are written on the paper". The link pointed out by broccoli forest about 〜てある mentions the following: 「~てある」は基本的には他動詞にしかつくことができません。このような「~てある」は「ページの端を折ってある」のように動詞の表す行為の結果として目的語が被る位置変化や状態変化を表します So here we can see the difference between 〜てある and 〜ている is that the former is used only ...


2

While Brandon's example about Cake shows a negative verb can be used with 初めて, I feel that in general that is an exception. I searched online and found a few other examples where a negative verb was used after 初めて: 20年目に初めてやらない年になってしまいました Here, this means that this was the first year (after 20 years) where something wasn't done. ...


2

Sure, you can use it with a negative predicate no problem: 生まれて初めておいしいケーキを見て食べたくならなかった。 For the second, in the case that you're giving someone directions or something, it doesn't sound wrong, but 初めて sounds like the first time ever. Maybe …曲がったところで、(やっと・やがて)先生の家が見えてくるはずなんです is better?



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