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2

Yes. Grammatically you can say 「ない」. This forms a complete sentence, which means "(it is / that kind of stuff is) not (t)here". However, this works only for physical existence or possession. In most cases, even when a question ends in ない?, a simple 「ない」 is not a grammatically correct answer. Like when asked 「あしたあそばない?」, the answer could be「あそばない」 but ...


0

Given that Japanese natives have commented without mentioning it, perhaps I'm wrong, but it seems like そもそも would make sense. Trying to estimate the context using your English example, eventually you came to like the band, but originally you did not like it, correct? So, そもそも would see usage like: そもそもこのバンドあまり好きじゃなかったけど。。。 or maybe そもそもはじめから好きではありませんでした。 ...


-1

I've seen 元【もと】に used in this manner before. It's usually used in contexts along the lines of "originally" or when talking about how things used to be. For example: 大学の頃、*元に*医学を専攻したかった(orを専門にしたかった)けど、1年後経営学に変更した。 "When I was in college I originally wanted to study medicine, but after 1 year I switched to business management."


2

I would say 「あの女の人みたいな人が好きです」 is probably better if you're want to talk about that woman. Otherwise it may not be clear who/what exactly you're talking about. with may depend on the context though. Also, notice that I replaced 女性 with 女の人. みたい is more casual expression (than のよう) and more everyday expression 女の人 seems more suitable and in line with the level ...


4

It is mostly about the degree of likelyhood implied regarding the content of the subordinate clause. 「としたら」 would generally express a lower degree of likelihood in the eyes of the speaker than 「たら」 or 「なら」 would. The difference, however, is often fairly subtle in actual usage for many speakers. You could always lower the degree of likelyhood in question ...


1

I think you may be trying to translate too directly from Japanese from English. Also 「A は B を意味いみする。」= A means B I am not a native speaker but perhaps the sentence you are looking for is: 「Dr.」 という題名は 医者の資格を持つことを意味する. The title of "Dr" indicates that this person is qualified as a medical doctor. Note: I have used "indicates" because I think titles ...


3

This sentence translates as "The document is (made (to be)) mandatory following/in compliance with/as required by High Level Design Phase by Chartis SDLC." However, to answer your actual question, you would parse it as ~に従って + 強制. The pattern Noun + に従って means "following/complying with ~" (It can has a semi-overlapping meaning to indicate a dependent ...


0

Well, put literally it means "in obedience to coercion". In context, it would appear to be something along the lines of "In accordance with..." or "In compliance with...", followed by an organization or a set of standards.


0

Yes, when the subject of a sentence of neutral description (現象文) is pronoun これ・それ or a noun modified with この・その. (Opening the refrigerator) あっ、この納豆 φ 腐ってる! Without この that would be あっ、納豆が腐ってる!. この納豆が腐ってる is "it is this natto that is rotten" and would be ungrammatical for a sentence of neutral description. この納豆は… would be a contrasive sentence.


0

I think 示【しめ】すis a better word for this as it means to "illustrate", "indicate" or "express": 私の肩書【かたが】きは医者【いしゃ】だということを示【しめ】している。


-1

I don't know if this is correct, but I think the construction 習おうと思っている could be translated literally as 'I'm thinking (to myself): let's learn'. 習おう is the same construction you would use to suggest doing something. You could for example say 日本語を習おう (meaning: Let's learn Japanese!)


4

There's a lot of small questions in there. I will start with the easiest ones. For how to get your place name right in Katakana, use wikipedia (go to English wikipedia, find word your know, switch to 日本語 = ...


0

I think the piece of the puzzle which you are missing is that トライする means "to try". ~する is the most common pattern for loans to turn into Japanese verbs (with some exceptions, like ググる etc.).


5

It would LITERALLY translate to (私たちが)話すとき/話すと、歌っているように(orみたいに)聞こえる(or聞こえます)。 When we talk, it sounds like we are singing. But to sound more natural I think you can say スウェーデン語で話すと、歌ってるみたいに聞こえるよ/聞こえますよ。 (Lit. When I speak Swedish, I sound like singing) スウェーデン語って、歌ってるみたいに聞こえるんだよ/聞こえるんですよ。 (Lit. Swedish language sounds like you're singing) ...


4

Yes, it is grammatically correct. It's of the form 〜てみる which means "to do 〜 and see how it goes/turns out". 〜てみる is fine for formal situations (actually, 〜てご[覧]{らん}ください is even more formal), but the トライする is not. However, トライしてみて is not just "cutesy" either. It's perfectly fine to use in (most/all?) familiar situations. For more formal situations, you ...


-3

Not a bad start, but this might be a little closer: 話す時、歌う気がしている。 時【とき】 can be affixed directly to plain verbs.


3

You have kind of answered your first question but I would like to add a few words. 「Aだとばかり思っていた」 means and implies that the speaker made a premature judgement about something to form an impression or opinion that is based only on fragmentary information. Later on, he realized that there was more to the story and had to re-form his opinion. ...


1

カレン: バイオリンを習おうと思っているんですが、いい先生を知りませんか。 As written, が is being used as a gentle lead-in. It's adding a sense of "I'm probably bothering you by asking, but...".


3

(それらの音が、世界の中心にある)ことを思い知らされ(る) それらの音 is the subject for 世界の中心にある. The subject for 思い知らされ(る) and 強く実感してしまう is 私/私たち(I/we/you).  


4

Your translation is correct. However, this が isn't the "but" one. It's the "softener" one. I can't think of a way to translate it (if there even is one), but it's often used to make one's own desires/actions seem less direct and a little more humble. Ex. 聞きたいことがあるんですが... → There's something I'd like to ask you... The difference between ...


5

ころ means "around", "about", or "(at) the time". So it translates to: At the time I'd just come back to London, ... Note that it's come to London, not come back from London. Other common usages include 子供のころ → When I was a child 高校生のころ → When I was in high school


7

Usually, です is a polite copula, similar to だ but more polite: それはリンゴだ  That is an apple それはリンゴです That is an apple (polite) But です can also be a politeness marker added to adjectives: あかい    is red あかいです  is red (polite) When it's a politeness marker, です doesn't inflect for tense: あかいです    is red (polite) あかかったです  was red (polite) The ...


5

Japanese grammar works in a different way when it comes to forming polite forms of verbs and i-adjectives. For verbs, you add ~ます to the verb and then you form all other verbs forms from combined polite verb: つかれる -> つかれます plain -> polite つかれます -> つかれました polite -> polite past つかれます -> つかれません polite -> polite negative It is different for ...


4

To form the polite past tense, you can't just add です to the non-polite past tense つかれた. You need to make the polite present tense つかれます into the past tense (i.e. ます -> ました) つかれました. That the ending ます inflects like any other verb, e.g. (present) はなす -> (past) はなした, is no accident. ます can be thought of as an auxiliary verb.


1

While I think the sentiment expressed in both answers that "both are fine" is generally correct. I think you will hear the します and いたします forms much more frequently, and I recommend using them except in contexts where you are sure the other 「どうぞよろしく。」 construction is preferred. I'm sure I'll get downvoted if my reasoning is wrong, but my sense is that ...


4

To answer the title question, I would have to say, "Yes, you can." If you lived in Japan, you would hear 「ますので」 at least a few times everyday and even more times on some days. We use it whenever we speak rather politely. When do we speak politely? We do so in business, in conversations with teacher/mentor figures, strangers, etc. 「ますので」 is needed ...


2

Both both are fine. For some reason my first text book taught どうぞよろしく but when I went to Japan one the first things I noticed was how rarely, if ever, I heard it. People always said よろしくお願い(いた)します, so I started to do the same. どうぞ means "please" and I would say is it it is used more often to make a request into a polite invitation ("please sit ...


2

How often does Japanese use present perfect tense? There isn't a present perfect tense in Japanese (persay) There is a discussion about it here 待たぬ Is it normal to say that in daily life? Not normal, sounds like old Japanese If not, what is the normal way to say it? [風]{かぜ}が[出]{で}てきた :-)


1

[Work in progress; got a bit tired halfway through. Will come back to finish translating in a bit.] Taken from the entry you linked. Might be a bit loose at some points, but it should get the point across. Q: A student often uses 「〜ますので」. It's not that he's wrong, but the sound of it together sounds off. What would be a good way to explain this? ...


1

I conjecture it is from ぬ <- の. Why? Okinawan actually has a regular sound change ぬ -> ん. For example, 犬{いぬ} -> いん. So I presume that somehow the regular sound changes got applied twice, and you get ん <- ぬ <- の.


7

My Japanese dictionaries (岩波国語辞典 and 小学館現代国語例解辞典) both have an entry for 生い立ち but not for 生い立つ, and my 古語辞典(角川 and 旺文社) both have an entry for おひたつ but not for おひたち. So I think 生い立ち came from おひたつ, and maybe おひたつ/生い立つ is now almost obsolete? Because I have never seen it used as a verb.


-2

はじめまして、あかみです。よろしくお願いします。 I hear this all the time. はじめまして、あかみです。どうぞよろしく。 Has どうぞ in it which is used when you give way to someone/allow them to go first which means there is a slight 'i'm giving you something, im a bit better than you' in this sentence. It doesn't matter which one to use, but if I have to choose then you see my reason why its the first ...


-2

It's a small version of の just as you guessed. This happens a lot in Japanese, I wouldn't be surprised if you hear it elsewhere in Okinawa. Searching the net, I found that the word has been translated to normal Japanese: ウチナーンチュ is literally equal to 沖縄の人 we already know ウチナー is Okinawa and チュ is person, so the only remaining thing is the it could be is ...


-2

生い立った Is quite simply like saying "That was his personal upbringing" Instead of 生い立ち  "That is his personal upbringing." It might be that the author is about to move on in the next sentence in terms of time frame for example: ....That was his upbringing. He is now 45 years old, and finds himself....


3

Could some hypothetical thing be true ? .... mmmmm, not necessarily. "Putting 2 more engineers on the task should get it done quicker" かといえば、そうではない。 It's a rhetorical construct, similar to what politicians and C-level executives often employ: "Do I think that it's a good thing that 200 people lost their lives? Of course I don't!" "Do I think it could ...


1

To throw a couple of other similar constructions out there: I remember that the phrase ”どうにもならなくなる” had me flummoxed for a while. Also, when I asked an acquaintance in his mid-30s why he wasn't married yet, and he responded that "もらわれてくれる人がいない", my head exploded on the spot.


0

Adding just a bit more to Mr. Kawaguchi's answer, I think that 家を出る is usually heard in a situation where someone (a teenager, a spouse) leaves the home where they are "supposed to be", often under not good circumstances (running away from home, domestic violence, imminent divorce, ...). C.f. 家出 In this case, the situation is about a presumably unmarried ...


1

This is just a supplement to the above answer & comment. Your question was specific to ~た上で (so I won't expand unless you expand the question) but FYI there are other different uses of 〜上. I found the following sentence (from one the Soumatome-goi series) helpful to remember: 地図の上では近いのに   行ってみると  遠い上に、ひどい道だった   よく調べた上で行けばよかった。 On ...


5

It means "after doing 〜". Almost like 〜てから. 両親とよく相談した上で、留学することにした。 → After discussing it with my parents, I decided that I'll study abroad. 家を買う場合は、十分調べた上で、決めた方がいい。 → When you buy a house, you should choose (it) after doing sufficient research. よく考えた上で、返事をするつもりだ。 → I intend to reply after careful consideration. There is some other nuance I ...


8

「これからほんのわずかな時間だけ... テレビにおジャマさせてもらう事にした。」 The agent of もらう is the speaker, not television. The speaker is the one who wants to be the receiver of a favor. (In this case, he wants to make himself be the receiver of a favor by force.) There is no 「お[前]{まえ}たちを」 implied anywhere in this sentence. Is that used in another place in the same context? The ...


4

Somewhat confusingly, double nagatives in Japanese can mean a range of different things. Sometimes it is used to signify that something exists at all, however little it is, as in the case of 疲れていなくもない or お金がなくもない. Other times it is used to emphasize that everyone did something or everything matches something, as in 声を上げない者はなかった. The former meaning has a ...


2

One could argue that the sentence in question may not be logical, but it is certainly a sentence that follows all the grammatical rules that I can think of. In that sense, it "makes sense" even if some people might not agree with. On that regard, I don't find your second sentence any better. It is a grammatically correct sentence that contains the same kind ...


1

This is just a thought that is too long for a comment but based on the following 水割り seems to be the natural order: To dilute with water = 水で割る ー> 水割り To take a 1/10th, or 10% = 一割 (same order); 15%= 一割5分 (seems logical) If we look at other words containing 割り then the order they come is consistent with what you would expect in long form, eg: ...


1

-i form of a verb, among other things, can be used to form nouns that are derived from this verb. For example to discount (v) -> discount (n): 割り{わり}引く{びく} -> 割引{わりびき} to rest/to have take a day off (v) -> rest/holiday (n): 休{やす}む -> 休{やす}み to apply (v) -> application (n): 申{もう}し込{こ}む -> 申{もう}し込{こ}み So I believe this is not the case of a verb form being ...


2

あなたが映画を見ているあいだ、私は買い物に行きます。 みんなが遊んでいるあいだ、私は働いています。 Both sentences are perfectly standard. The structure あいだ(に), is indeed not bound to being used with the past tense.


7

Having read it several times, I could only say that that is good writing. It contains no errors, ambiguity or unnaturalness; therefore, it would not cause any misunderstanding among the readers. Mixing active voice with passive voice in a sentence is nothing new in English, is it? Consider the following sentence. "Tofu is made by coagulating soy milk ...


-1

another verb that cannot change to potential form is ある However, you can either use 可能性がある or advance grammar (~うる) to form ありうる (or ありえます、ありえない)to express it is possible or impossible


2

出来る is the potential form (〜えます form, if you will) of する. As such, in common usage the best practice is to use the native potential form for all non-する verbs and できる for the rest. Proper construction of the potential form is as follows: Type I (〜う) verbs: Change -u to -eる (e.g. 行く => 行ける). This ending can also be further inflected (e.g. 行けます、行けない, etc.) ...


1

There are specific verbs which don't take the potential form (offhand I remember する, which changes to できる, and 分かる, which you can circumvent by using 理解できる. Naturally, できる can't be put in the potential form either, due to recursion.). Other than that, I don't recall any verbs that are prohibited from using specified forms. Transitivity affects particle ...


2

Short answer: 得{え}る or うる is more literary. ことができる is slightly more formal than られる and both fit for everyday use. ことができる and られる can only be used to describe humans' ability so they don't fit well with non-volitional verbs (無意志動詞). える or うる can also be used to describe possibility. E.g. ×あられる ○あり得る Both ことができる and られる can be used when you are not ...



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