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4

1)「[天災]{てんさい}があれば、[日本]{にほん}は[苦]{くる}しみを[被]{こうむ}ることになるだろう。」 2)「天災があれば、日本は[困]{こま}ることになるだろう。」 Both sentences are grammatical and both make sense. The use of 「ことになる」 is very good and natural. If I may speak on the native level, however, each has a little problem. 1) One would need to use a phrase or at least an adjective to modify 「苦しみ」 to describe ...


1

You have clearly got the gist of the sentence. 1.いたい is conjugated from いる (to exist) to mean "to want to be". Grammatically, yes, but the actual meaning and nuance of 「~~でいたい」 is "to stay (a certain way)". In this case, "to stay single" rather than "to be single". 2.From the 〜たい suffix, the subject of the sentence can be inferred to be the ...


1

「ほとんど[寝]{ね}てなかったね。[朝帰]{あさかえ}ってきて、ちょっとベッド[入]{はい}って、また[家庭教師]{かていきょうし}[行]{い}って。で、スーパー、その[次]{つぎ}の[日]{ひ}はないようにしてたりです。」 This is written so informally that it almost sounds like it was casually spoken. The 「~~してたりです」 ending is sort of "new" and definitely "in". 「次の日はないようにしてたりです」 ≒「次の日は[仕事]{しごと}がないようにしていたりします」 ≒ "then, I would (occasionally) try not to do ...


6

「[自分]{じぶん}は[死]{し}ぬ[前]{まえ}に[一目思]{ひとめおもう}う[女]{おんな}に[逢]{あ}いたいと[云]{い}った。」 The part that you are misreading is 「一目思う女に逢いたい」, which can be rephrased as 「思う女に一目逢いたい」. 「一目」 modifies「逢いたい」, and not 「思う」. In fact, it is impossible to "一目思う a person" in the first place; It just makes no sense. 「一目会いたい」 is a common set phrase meaning "to want to see someone even ...


3

「[自分]{じぶん}で[日本語]{にほんご}を[学]{まな}ぶのは[難]{むずか}しい。」 is nice and grammatical. You could make it sound even more natural by changing 「自分」 to 「ひとり」 or 「自分ひとり」. Furthermore, adult native speakers would use the word 「[独学]{どくがく}」 to mean "to study by oneself". If you were a beginner, though, you would not need to know this word yet; It can wait. One would say: ...


2

Do 〜によると and 〜によれば have similar meanings at all? Yes, very much so. In fact, in informal speech between two individuals, the two are largely, if not completely, interchangeable. We just do not hold each other responsible for word choices like these. In the media, however, the distinction is made more often and more strictly than in people's daily ...


1

We have two very different usages of 「ようにして」 here. 「[顔]{かお}をうしろへ[振]{ふ}り[向]{む}け るようにして[聞]{き}いた」 "asked by turning my head towards my back"? Yes if you mean he turned his head just a little, but no if you mean he turned his head around anywhere close to 180 degrees. 「ように」 was used because he did not turn his head that much. Here, 「よう」= "like". ...


0

You are almost correct. And I want to mention some detail thing you didn't mention. The first sentence means "When I observe my father, I somewhat think he feel like he simply earn money, rather than earn money to have fun or enjoy yourself." The first sentence doesn't mention saving money but earning money without any purpose to spend (e.g.. to have fun). ...


3

Roughly saying, you're right. Compared with 日本では…, the sentence with 日本は… lacks solid image of a grammatical case, and are likely to appear along with another sentence in which 日本 doesn't function as a locative case. e.g. 旅行するならどこだろうか? 日本だろうか? 日本は美味しい和食が食べられる・・・ You say 日本で美味しい和食が食べられる” から 変わった文, but whether what you say is right or not depends on what ...


3

There are several ways to say it. Some of the common ways would be 「username@email.comまでメールください。」 「メールはこのアドレスまで(お願いします)。username@email.com」 「メールは下記アドレスまで。username@email.com」 「メールはこちらへどうぞ。username@email.com」 To a friend, you would say 「ここにメールしてね。username@email.com」


2

(1)“[日本]{にほん}では[美味]{おい}しい[和食]{わしょく}が[食]{た}べられる” (2)“日本は美味しい和食が食べられる” The difference, the way I see it, is that while (1) is a complete sentence by any standard, (2) would only be considered a complete sentence by the standard of informal and/or colloquial speech. 「日本ではおいしい和食が食べられる。」, without adding anything, is simply a good and natural-sounding ...


4

The conjunctive form (aka pre-ます form) sounds more dry/learned/erudite/scholarly/formal. I hate all of those adjectives to describe it, but I think you know what I mean. It's of a higher register than the て form.


3

「[自転車]{じてんしゃ}は[楽]{らく}だったです。」 This is ungrammatical. As a Japanese-speaker, I do know that a few of us would actually say it, but if one said or wrote it in school, it would certainly be corrected. The correct sentence would be: 「自転車は楽でした。」 or 「自転車は楽だった。」 The former is a little politer than the latter. Now, onto how to translate it.. To ...


1

The first sentence: 昨日はビールを飲んでパイを食べました。 implies that you drank beer, and then ate pie. On the other hand, the second sentence: 昨日はビールを飲みパイを食べました。 does not imply any thing about the order in which you performed the two actions. It could be translated as "drank beer and ate pie", or "ate pie and drank beer". ...


4

I must say that your understanding of the sentence is 100% accurate. Rules regarding the use of commas around relative clauses (or anywhere for that matter) in Japanese are not nearly as strict as in English. Where to use commas is pretty much left at the discretion of each writer. The two commas used in 「すらりと揺ぐ茎の頂に、心持首を傾けていた細長い一輪の蕾が、ふっくらと弁を開いた。」 seem ...


2

「[光]{ひか}る[事]{こと}は光るが[切]{き}れそうもない」 is in the structure: 「Verb or Adjective + ことは + Same Verb or Adjective + が/けど + Phrase」 = "(Something) is indeed ~~~~, but ~~~~~~" 「切れそうもない」= "does not (even) look like it cuts well". 「も」 is there for emphasis, which is why I used "even". "It is indeed shiny, but it does not (even) look like it cuts ...


4

Dictionary form: 「Te-form of Verb A + から + に + する 」 Imperative form: 「Te-form of Verb A + から + に + しろ(or せよ) 」 This is a common set phrase meaning "Do (something) only after doing A." The translation you provided is passable but is certainly not a very literal one. 「[早]{はや}く[寝]{ね}るのはいいけど、せめて[晩飯食]{ばんめしく}って[風呂入]{ふろはい}ってからにしろ。」 In this ...


2

と -in the sense of A and B- and や can only be used to connect nouns or noun-phrases, but they cannot be used to connect adjectives and verbs. Therefore this sentence would be wrong: x 日本語クラスは簡単なと面白いと楽しい。 But you can say this: ○ 日本語クラスといえば、「簡単な」と「面白い」と「楽しい」という言葉を思い出す。 Regarding Japanese classes, I think of [the words] "easy/simple" and ...


2

It is indeed the conditional と but takes more of the form of 'when' rather than 'if', in a similar way to how とき is used. You'll see it used in this way quite a lot. This also means that anything before と doesn't necessarily have a cause-effect relationship. It's not because the the women was doing her laundry by the river that the peach came. ...


2

To analyze this strictly by the actual words being used, 「とこ(< ところ)」 should definitely refer to 「[第]{だい}4[部隊]{ぶたい}」 as the word 「[配属]{はいぞく}」 , by definition, means "assignment to a department, divison, group, etc.". In real life , that is how we use the word as well. It is true that when one gets assigned to a division, one is often given a specific ...


5

とこ is a coloquial abbreviation of ところ, which means place. In that sentence, it refers the troop, not the position. If he said it in standard(non-slungy) Japanese, It would be 面倒臭いところに配属されてしまったぜ。全くよ. I'm not an expert, but a division is far (about 10 times) larger than a regiment in military jargon. So this 部隊 may be a battalion or a company. I would ...


0

In 仲良くなると恩着せがましいと思うのではないかと思います, the subject of 恩着せがましい is 日本人 and the subject of the first 思う is the reader, so it's basically saying: I think that once you do, YOU might find THEM condescending.


3

「[察]{さっ}してくれよ、とボイスくんが[僕]{ぼく}を[見]{み}る。」 Does と in that sentence imply と言って ("Understand it please - said ボイスくん looking at me.")? No, it does not imply that. If ボイスくん had actually said 「察してくれよ」 out loud to 僕, the author surely would have expressed that using a direct quote just like all those direct quotes from the beginning. Besides, the ...


2

No subtleties, just grammar. First, 相関 stands for "correlation" as noun and "to correlate" as verb. Now, × 国民の平均身長は栄養状態と相関だ。 It's an ungrammatical sentence because Japanese postpositions can't modify noun by its own, contrary to English prepositions (but similarly to that of Latin & Romance languages). Grammatical ones are: (a) ...


2

You can interpret it as 『国民の栄養状態は平均身長と相関』だ but the 国民の栄養状態は平均身長と相関 part is still imcomplete sentence. Likewise, 「『Windows 10はRaspberry Piと対応』ですか?」 So, it's different from 相関している or 対応している.


2

[命]{いのち}と[引]{ひ}き[換]{か}えにしてでも [叶]{かな}えたい[望]{のぞ}みって そういうの[抱]{かか}えている[人]{ひと}は [世]{よ}の[中]{なか}に[大勢]{おおぜい}いるんじゃないのかな。 だから、 それが[見付]{みつ}からない[私達]{わたしたち}って、 その[程度]{ていど}の[不幸]{ふこう}しか[知]{し}らないってことじゃん。 [恵]{めぐ}まれ[過]{す}ぎて バカになっちゃってるんだよ。 To understand any sentence taken from a passage, one needs to be able to replace in Japanese all of the impersonal ...


4

Recently, @naruto mentioned the phrase 頭が赤い魚を食べた猫, which can be understood in many ways. There is some ambiguity in how each word relates to each other. Among other possibilities, it could mean [(頭が赤い)魚]を食べた猫 (red-headed fish) [(頭が赤い)+(魚を食べた)]猫 (red-headed cat) The same applies here. Consider the following pattern: AとBとCのD As far as logic and ...


0

You usually say AとBの違い to mean "the difference between A and B" and AとBとCの違い to mean "the difference among A, B and C", and I think it would be more natural to interpret せりとレタスとキャベツの違い as "the difference of parsley, lettuce, and cabbage" than "parsley, lettuce and the difference of cabbage".


3

「Mini-sentence A + うちに + Mini-sentence B」= "B happens while A is happening." B = [気]{き}がつくと[何]{なに}やら[深]{ふか}い[井戸]{いど}みたいなところを[落]{お}っこちているところでした A = アリスがふみとどまろうかと[考]{かんが}えるひまもない Above is the structure of the whole sentence and one's comprehension of this structure is the prerequisite to a good analysis of any part of it. You clearly are unfamiliar ...


2

How we say it totally depends on the situation, the speaker, etc. More common phrases would include: 「そういうつもりではありませんでした。」 「そんなつもりではなかったのです(or なかったんです)。」 「(それは)私の[本意]{ほんい}ではありません(or ありませんでした)。」 「(それは)私の[意図]{いと}していることではありません。」 The first two without using a Sino loanword would be the most versatile. In formal or serious situations, however, the ones ...


1

1.) [僕]{ぼく}が[好]{す}きな[人]{ひと} Can this sentences have an ambiguous double meaning of "The person that I like" and "The person that likes me"? First, that is not a sentence; It is only a noun phrase (or a relative clause). "The person that I like." is not a sentence in English, either. The answer is affirmative. It can mean both, but to mean "The ...


1

The former; the fall was so sudden (それがすごく急で) that she had no time to consider bracing her feet.


3

There is no redundancy in this sentence -- none. If redundancy existed, that would be because you translated word for word by using a dictionary. It says 「でも、 そうかと[言]{い}って」; It does not say 「でも、しかし」, 「でも、それでも」 or 「しかし、それでも」, which would be redundant. How about "But even if that were the case"? 「そうかと言って」 is used to state a contrary idea/opinion while ...


1

It's not. Don't take the translation of そうかと言って so literally. This link here states 3 optional translations for the word. Could be translated as "nevertheless", "and yet", etc. It actually might not qualify (maybe someone else can chime in) but think of it as an idiomatic expression. Also worth noting, in general, Japanese is far more forgiving about ...


4

You can say 「X + は + Y + の + [5倍]{ごばい} + [大]{おお}きい。」. You can also say 「XはYの5倍の大きさがある。」.


5

Both are correct for different meanings and/or nuances. 「[終]{お}わりたい」 is used to talk about something that one is actively and/or personally involved in. One would generally have at least an amount of control of when it can be finished. Example: You have been doing your homework and you wish to finish it as soon as possible so you can go play tennis. ...


3

Question 1 可能です。ただし挙げてくださった例文は、実際はあまり使われないでしょう。なぜなら [明日早く起きたら] [食べられる朝ごはんはアイスクリームです。] [子供がうるさいので] [たまらない父はイヤホンをつけた。] という構造に解釈する方が自然なので、そう誤解される可能性が高いからです。 以下のように、被修飾語が最後に来る文であれば一般的です。 こちらがポイントを貯めるともらえる景品です。 「ポイントを貯めるともらえる」が「景品」を修飾しています。 Question 2 これも可能です。ただし説明にある そして「途中で何か良い物を拾ったら半分はヘルメスの神に捧げるから」は「無事に旅をさせてくれといったものです」を修飾しているのですか? ...


5

No, it is neither old-fashioned nor a form of きかなくてはならない. This form of ~てならない means "really, really ~". It is similar to the forms ~てしかたがない・~てしょうがない・~てたまらない. Here are a few examples: ワープロを始めたせいか、この[頃]{ごろ}目が疲れてしょうがない → It might be because I started using a word processor, because lately my eyes are really tired. いよいよあした帰国かと思うと、嬉しくてしかたがありません → ...


2

The only part that's missing from your question is the translation of 人生にチャレンジ. He's saying that if he chooses a チャレンジ "self-challenge"(?) for his life (rather than an ordinary life), he might get hooked on whatever the challenge is and he thinks that then he may not be able to get married. チャレンジ implies doing something out of the ordinary (e.g., starting ...


0

Suppose you say "it's not" or そうで…ありません そうではない is the most natural choice for simple "it's not", and if you put stress on は, it implies there's other possibility even if it's specifically not the case. そうでもない is (1) "not really" or (2) "it's not either". そうでない is not really natural for a sentence, it rather sounds like a clause.


4

としたことが and ともあろうものが are used to express the surprise of the speaker toward the (bad) behaviour of someone. With 私, it expresses something around the line of "Who could have thought I/someone like me/someone of my standing/someone of my position (would do such a thing)" Here are some examples from the 和英大辞典: 君としたことが, とんだへまをしでかしてくれたものだ.  You, of all ...


1

You can say... (noun)の長さ・重さ・高さは(number)(unit)です。 eg. ネクタイの長さは145センチです。 百万円の重さは100グラムです。 あべのハルカスの高さは300メートルです。 (noun)は長さ・重さ・高さ(が)(number)(unit)です。/が(number)(unit)あります。 eg. ネクタイは長さ(が)145センチです。/長さが145センチあります。 百万円は重さ(が)100グラムです。/重さが100グラムあります。 あべのハルカスは高さ(が)300メートルです。/高さが300メートルあります。 (noun)は(number)(unit)の長さ・重さ・高さです。/の長さ・重さ・高さがあります。 eg. ...


1

I feel that (noun)の「高さ・長さ」は○○○ is correct, see for example here or here or even here or this one. It is also useful to compare lengths of different things, or height of different people etc... However, there is another way to express the same idea: (noun)は ○○○の「高さ・長さ」 [だ・です・がある」 Which would be closer obviously to "This thing is 10 meters long" rather than ...


2

The sentence in question basically says that the soul is like liquid, and must be always inside some kind of container. A magician can't drain soul from someone and keep it on its own. You seem to have failed to translate the verb 留まる (=stay, reside) at the last. The basic structure of the sentence is "魂はあくまで~に留まる" (The soul absolutely stays in ~). And the ...


1

Your translation shows your complete understanding of the phrase even if you do not like it yourself. A difficulty this relative clause could present for the translator is the fact that 「霞む」 is an intransitive verb and that is not the action either performed by or against 「打突」, the main noun of the relative clause. What I often do in such cases is that I ...


1

In this sentence, I think the author suggests valuing one important thing, life. Not two things (life and self) separately. So I would say this 読点 (comma) servers as an appositive marker. That is to say, 一回限りの人生 and かけがえのない自己 are the same idea described in two different ways. To translate this literally, you can use comma as well in English: Let's ...


0

You can interpret it as …人生 and …自己 as you suggest, but it's more like a noun used like an adverb like 一生(いっしょう)i.e. "during your life". …に or には don't make sense along with the predicate 大切にしよう. Though 人生に一度は大切にしよう means "let's take care of it at least once in your life". Basically に ≠ in.


1

This isn't literal but it seems natural: 妹の誕生日に人形をあげました。


3

Don't treat 「とは」 as a single unit. 「〜と違う」 means "different from". This 「と」 is the one normally glossed as "with", although I can't think of a way to use that gloss here. When 「〜と違う」 is used in the outermost layer of the sentence, it is normally becomes 「〜とは違う」. While I can't give a technical explanation of why this is the case, I'd say the hand-wavey one ...


0

To say 「誕生日に」>「誕生日は」 in OP's context is very Japanese-as-a-foreign-language-esque. There is absolutely nothing wrong or unnatural in saying 「誕生日は」. In fact, 「は」 would be a very natural choice among native speakers. To attach 「は」, the word does not have to be the grammatical subject of the sentence.



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