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1

~のもとで means "under (control of) ~", of course, but I think this usage of もとで is not very natural. This sentence would have been perfectly fine without that (i.e., "未だLV1で燃え燻っている"). Or maybe the author wanted to express a feeling of "can't get rid of the LV1 group" by using that. Anyway, I recommend that you don't try to learn something new from this part. ...


1

Yes, you are using でも correctly in this sentence. And this sentence would be much better if you say "おさけも" instead of "おさけを". (も ≒ also)


4

The first phrase is nominal. It is composed of 接頭語(prefix)「御」 and 名詞(noun)「来駕」. The numbers in the right side represent the reading order of 漢字. The second phrase is composed of a verb(動詞)「[成]{な}す」, a subsidiary verb(補助動詞)「[下]{くだ}さる」 and an auxiliary verb(助動詞)「たい」. The reading order of the second phrase is not simple top-to-down. This kind of reading ...


2

Yes, you can. Negative verb and adjective behave in the same manner conjugation-wise, so you can form it with adjective in analogy of ~なくたって. Your example is correct. Grammatically you can create ~たって from: verbs (positive), na-adjectives & copula: ta-form + って 食べたって, 行ったって, 死んだって, 勉強したって, きれいだったって, 子供だったって i-adjectives, negative ...


0

Yes, that と is the quotative particle, because that's a short for これまでかと言うほど. これまでかと ("to this extent", "this much") as a whole modifies 影響した, and it describes how strongly the 恋慕 influenced the 成長速度. A more common fixed expression similar to this is これでもかと(言うほど), which works just like this and effectively means strongly/badly/cruelly.


-1

The -te form comes with a second verb, unless you have a command like "ganbatte!". You can put the politeness and past tense in the second verb: 日本に住んでいる 日本に住んでいた 日本に住んでいます 日本に住んでいました If you have -tai, I recommend thinking of it like an i-adjective. The conjugations, similar to above, are as follows: 日本に住みたい 日本に住みたかった 日本に住みたいです 日本に住みたかったです I'm not ...


3

That's a phrase anyone younger than Sherlock Holmes never uses. It's an example of 候文{そうろうぶん}, which had been official writing style until Edo period but completely died out around WWII. Both the wording and orthography are as old as hills (literally). Despite its look, not much particles are omitted because most of them are embedded in the form of kanji in ...


1

Another phrase for "reason" is "in order to", which is usually constructed with (の)ために. The shorter version of that is (の)に. 私は日本語の[新聞]{しんぶん}を[読]{よ}むのに[辞書]{じしょ}を[使]{つか}う。 watashi ha nihongo no shinbun wo yomu no ni jisho wo tsukau. In order to read Japanese newspaper, I use a dictionary. That's the grammar point used in your first sentence "sentaku ni ...


6

「〜あげる」 and 「〜くれる」 make it clear that there are a giver and the beneficiary.  「〜くれる」can be used to describe an action which benefits not only the speaker but also people who are intimate or familiar with the speaker. 「水泳のコーチが、私に平泳ぎのコツ(tips)を教えてくれました。」 「水泳のコーチが、(私の)友達に平泳ぎのコツを教えてくれました。」 「水泳のコーチが、(私が応援する)佐藤選手に平泳ぎのコツを教えてくれました。」 These sentences ...


0

生きる is the verb "to live", whereas 生きている means "to be living", as you correctly guessed. Using 生きているのが leads to some problems. This の makes the verb to a noun, which becomes the subject due to が. But in the following you don't use it as subject. Using the te-form instead solves that problem, as it breaks the sentence down in two meaningful parts: The one ...


1

You're seeing a verb which does not really exist there. 一旦【いったん】 is an adverb which means "once", "temporarily", or "for a moment".


2

Looks to me to be just the て that joins clauses i.e. verb-A-て verb-B do verb-A and do verb-B or, during the act of verb-A, verb-B The latter option seems to work better here. Living in these times, we know that wickedness is increasing more and more.


4

When you are moved by a movie, you have already watched the movie. You remember the scenes, music, and the story. LA VITA E'BELLAを見る時 implies when you were moved, LA VITA E'BELLA hadn't finished yet. So it sounds like you were moved by something else (such as equipment of the theater or behavior of the audience) during the movie or just before it ...


3

In most of the cases よく should be put just before the verb: コリアンレストランへよく行く。 I often go to the corean restaurant. よくあるご質問 frequently asked questions It sounds better. And when the verb is built with a noun, just before this noun: 日本語をよく勉強します。 I often study Japanese. よく検索されるキーワード keywords that are often looked up But you can also put よく ...


2

First, I assume you have the basic knowledge discussed in this question: Why can we use の after へ and から? In short, 平安時代末期から is like an adverb and modifies a verb. 平安時代末期からの is like an adjective and modifies a noun. 平安時代からの武将 a bushō from the Heian period (say he's a time traveler) 平安時代から知られている to be known from the Heian period 月への旅行 a journey to ...


2

I agree with you; I would interpret this sentence about サルビア as "red and beautiful", where 真っ赤 and 美しい are connected in parallel. 真っ赤に美しい (redly beautiful?) doesn't make sense to me, but grammatically, that should be how 真っ赤 can adverbially modify 美しい. The same goes for 平凡で埋没している. It's just "キャラクターが平凡だ and キャラクターが埋没している".


3

By ending the sentence like this, the speaker is implying he has something more to say. His wife died, his kids left home, and that may not be the end of his story. Or he may just want to add how sad he was. He may continue his story right after this sentence, but the remaining part may be simply omitted when it's obvious. 「明日映画に行こう。」「あー、今、お金がなくて…。」 ...


2

What to do you think about this parsing: (子どもたちが話している)(にぎやかな声). The verb phrase modifies にぎやかな声 as a whole. EDIT: The て form and 連体節 (modifying with a verb phrase) doesn't serve the same purpose. て tends to stream-line (one things after the other) whereas 連体節 modifies the things that follows. (子どもたちが話していて)(にぎやかな声), the parenthesis can't be placed like ...


0

In these cases a kokugo dictionary really helps. If you're studying for N1, sites like Kotobank will be one of your greatest sources of information: Definition: https://kotobank.jp/word/%E8%87%B3%E3%82%8B-433135#E3.83.87.E3.82.B8.E3.82.BF.E3.83.AB.E5.A4.A7.E8.BE.9E.E6.B3.89


2

[V1] + ては + [V2] or [V1] + では + [V2] is a fixed expression that describes two actions (V1, V2) are repeatedly happening in rapid succession. See ては definition 3: 3 二つの動作・作用などが対になって繰り返される意を表す。「幼い頃は電車を見ては喜んでいた」「姉はいつも洋服を脱いでは着て楽しんでいる」 So this sentence means that someone is repeating the two actions (壁面に罅【ひび】を刻む and パーツを外気に晒【さら】す) again and again.


0

Yes you can. This is one of the cases where の effectively acts as の + noun. The noun is implicit and as stated in previous answers it is 物{もの}. You can read more about how の works here.


3

Yes it works. だれの can stand for だれのもの too.


2

と here means when. It's a conditional (A と B), where B naturally follows from A. See this post. The sentence as a whole reads like: Because of this, it will be safe when you hide under a desk like you would during an earthquake.


5

I would translate 微妙な具合で to 'in a subtle way'. How 'subtle' is it? What does 微妙な具合で actually mean? The following sentences explain: 暑くはないが、涼しくもない、停滞しているような、それでいて流れの存在しているような。 全てが内保されて、中には何も存在しない。 矛盾こそが理論的であり、同時に混沌の中に秩序が成り立っている。 で here shows a certain condition or state.


4

I think it's because he (story writer) is seeing the turtle's action from Taro's side.


0

Well... how about this あの かさ は だれ の もの ですか Ano kasa-wa dare-no mono desu-ka?


4

夜になろうと朝を迎えようと ≒夜になろうが朝を迎えようが ≒夜になっても朝を迎えても (more casual) 「~しようと~しようと」 means "(regardless of) whether ~~ or ~~". This ~ようと is like "even if~~", consisting of 意志・推量の助動詞「う・よう」 + 接続助詞「と」. This usage of と is #❷-4-ア on goo辞書: 逆接の仮定条件を表す。たとえ…であっても。…ても。㋐意志・推量の助動詞「う」「よう」「まい」などに付く。「何を言われよう―気にしない」「雨が降ろう―風が吹こう―、毎日見回りに出る」


1

This で clearly indicates cause (原因{げんいん}) goo で ❶-7. 開け放った窓から入ってくる夏の空気が、微妙な具合で五感を鈍くしているのかも知れない。 The summer atmosphere filtering in through the opened window. Under this delicate/subtle situation, his/her (five) senses (seem to) have become dull.


5

It is not exactly incorrect to do that, but you should try to avoid assuming other people's emotions because you can never know them for sure. The way to get around it is to add uncertainty to the statement. Most commonly, at least in casual conversation, you use でしょう at the end. 彼はピザを食べたいでしょう - (it seems) he wants to eat pizza. You can also use the ...


1

First, I'm going to explain about sentence ender ね (not interjectional ね). It has several usages and among them, there's one that can be interpreted like English tag question. But there's a function that's shared by those usages. It is to indicate that information accompanied with な or ね is your impression or conclusion through observation (including ...


4

It's all about emphasis. Plain and simple 簡単です: "It's easy". But that's a bit abrupt for the Japanese speaker who doesn't want you to feel stupid that you need to have it explained, so s(he) says instead... 簡単ですね: "It's easy, isn't it?" This creates a little fiction that instead of telling you something you don't know and thus exposing your ignorance, he ...


2

You are right about that ほど can be a substitute for this kind of まで in these phrases. However, they are not nouns. This まで is 副助詞 and this ほど is also 副助詞. Dictionaries (eg. 大辞林, 大辞泉) define both the noun meaning and the 副助詞 meaning of ほど. までに is considered a collocation(連語) in these dictionaries. So, they contain the entry of までに. According to the second ...


2

In your examples, ところ is used as a 形式名詞 (formal noun). It grammatically is a noun, but can't stand alone and just works like converter between word classes. Think it as "the time" used for "when", or "the way" used for "how". No. ~する時 means "when ~". When you're asked "What are you doing?", your answer wouldn't be "When I'm eating." It depends on what you ...


2

The order does not matter in Japanese The only rule is that the verb must come last (aside from sentence-ending particles). The following are all correct and mean the same thing: 6時に私がケーキを食べた ケーキを私が6時に食べた 私が6時にケーキを食べた They all mean "I ate (the) cake at 6:00". In English, which relies on word order to determine grammar roles of words, flipping ...


1

It's used for both, but the use as second person imperatives is a "hack". E.g. one can say ドア閉めようぜ to a person, and it's clear that the other person closes the door alone. Yet literary it would mean Let's close the door (together). Similarly, one can say そういうこと言うのやめようよ and it's clear the speaker isn't doing that activity, but it doesn't quite mean Don't say ...


1

Let's look at the definition of どうしても: どう努力【どりょく】してみても。 That is to say regardless of how hard (I) try. も here means regardless. It's part of a general pattern of ~(て/で)も, which has a general meaning of even if.


2

〜ても means "Even if X". In this case, "No matter what I do, Natto I cannot eat." 雨が降っても強行だ 走っても間に合わない 見つかったとしても壊れているに違いない 食べてもよい


2

Here's the basic difference. [noun] + をする: common; means "do ~". [noun] + がする: relatively uncommon; means "there's a sense of ~", "feel ~". 勉強をする and 勉強がする 復活をする and 復活がする 勉強 here is a noun meaning 'study', and 復活 here is a noun meaning 'revival/resurrection'. So 勉強をする and 復活をする make sense, but 勉強がする/復活がする does not make sense. Examples: ...


0

勉強がする and 復活がする don't make sense. 感情がする and 感情をする themselves make little sense but for example, なつかしい感情がした can be understood as 懐かしい感情を覚えた and 複雑な感情をしたロボット as "a robot who is equipped with complex emotion".


4

One could argue that 思う has meanings other than "to think", such as "feel" or "regard", but they all boil down to thinking and emotions. The reason you hear it so often actually isn't because it has separate meanings. You hear it a lot because it shows the speaker is uncertain or has quoted an opinion and is not necessarily a fact. This makes it great for ...


1

The purpose of that structure is making "無論、生き残ったのには理由があるからなのだ" into a subordinate clause for "彼は唯一の生き残り", in other words, those are one sentence divided by period. It enhances an effect like "He - of course, it's because there's a reason he survived - is the sole survivor".


2

It is a noun. It has a meaning of "abstract place; scene; range". I used online Japanese-Japanese dictionary here: search for 抽象的な場所。場面。範囲。 No, they would all sound weird. 食べているところなんです feels like "I'm at the moment of eating (something)", and 食べているんです means "I'm eating". 出でかけているところ is not between 出でかけるところ and 出かけたところ. I noticed that in addition to leave ...


11

First of all, forget that fansub. It's totally wrong (unless you've misheard the woman's line), and 通い詰めることになりそう has nothing to do with any idiomatic expression. Translating ことになる as 'It is decided that ...' is one of the possibilities. In this case, it's the matter of her prediction rather than the decision of someone else, and phrases like 'cannot help ...


0

Edited: go look at naruto's answer. He's got a lot more experience to answer this (its my first time on this site, down voters pls no harass). Usually, ことになる roughly means "to become thing," where "thing" is usually modified by some phrase. According to Denshi Jisho, 通い詰める means "to visit frequently." In this context, 通い詰める is modifying こと (thing, matter) ...


4

Marking it with は is certainly not wrong, and would in fact be natural. It doesn't change the meaning, but if the は is stressed, it will contrast yesterday to all other days, and will thus put stress on the time: 昨日勉強しましたか - Did you study yesterday? (Plain question) 昨日は勉強しましたか - Did you study yesterday? (As opposed to any other day) However, if the は ...


3

By using similar words twice, it says the excess is even more excessive. For example, 少しだけなら食べ過ぎても大丈夫だけど、あまり食べ過ぎるとお腹が痛くなるよ。 If you just eat a little too much, that's OK, but if you eat really too much, you'll get a stomachache.


3

To take a picture with someone: 一緒に写真を撮って(も)いいですか? To take a picture of someone, when the subject is your friend: 写真(を)撮って(も)いい? When you know the subject is ready to be taken a picture (for example when it's Mickey Mouse in Tokyo Disney Land): 写真を撮って(も)いいですか? Something like 写真お願いします usually means 'Can you take a photo for/of us?', but it's ...


7

「たくさんの本を読んで」 and 「本をたくさん読んで」 have the same meaning which is "read many books then...", "because of reading many books, ..." or something like that, I think. たくさん in 「たくさんの本を読んで」 is a noun. たくさん in 「本をたくさん読んで」 is a noun originally, but it's working as an adverb here. Which たくさん should be used in a sentence depends on the context or the other words in the ...


0

I think it's a difference in emphasis. Case 1: たくさんの本を読んで Here the thing that is emphasized is the number of books read. It's saying: (I) read a lot of books. Case 2: 本をたくさん読んで Here the thing that is emphasized is the action of reading. It's saying: (I) do a lot of reading of books. That said, I think they're mostly equivalent.


8

I think the difference is somehow similar to that between ice cream and iced cream, or popcorn and popped corn. When you combine two nouns directly, it becomes one fixed idea. 日本料理 is the name of traditionally recognized Japanese local cuisine, in the same way French cuisine, Chinese cuisine or Turkish cuisine are. It includes sushi, soba, tempura etc. ...



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