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16

I think I don't have enough English vocabulary to express this nuance. So please let me try to explain this visually.   「~てきた」 First of all, 「~てきた」 expresses something in the past. If the speaker at present says 「~てきた」, s/he is talking about something which started sometime in the past and continued until now. Like the sentence, ...


14

You can say [10人]{じゅうにん}に[1人]{ひとり} (「X人にY人」= "Y out of X people" / "Y in every X people") so One of ten people in the world suffers mental disorder. would be like 世界では10人に1人が精神障害に苦しんでいます。or 世界の10人に1人が精神障害に苦しんでいます。 You could also use 10人[中]{ちゅう}1人 10人のうち1人 (「X人中Y人」/「X人のうちY人」 = "Y of X people") as in ...


14

This sentence can technically mean both, but it usually (or almost always) means 1. To mean 2., we normally say 彼は来ないことを知りませんでした。 = He didn't know about the (someone else's) absense. because 彼 is the topic of the whole sentence. In other words, the use of が after 彼 more or less indicates that "彼がこない" is the relative clause which modifies こと.


13

The girl who likes being photographed is my friend. 写真を撮って貰うことが好きだ女性は私の友達です。 Change the "好きだ"(← the 終止形/predicative form) to its 連体形/attributive form "好きな" to modify the noun 女性. So your sentence would translate to: 写真を撮ってもらうことが好きな女性は私の友達です。 or 写真を撮ってもらうのが好きな女性は私の友達です。 You can also say it as: 写真に/を撮られるのが好きな女性は私の友達です。


13

"At least" is merely the English translation of the phrases found in bilingual dictionaries. It tells us nothing about how 「せめて」 and 「少なくとも」 are (and are not) used in actual Japanese context. In my Japanese ear, to tell the truth, 「せめて」 and 「少なくとも」 sound like two fairly different types of phrases even though I must admit that they are sometimes actually ...


12

-てみる - used for trying something out, like a food you've never had before. 私の作った料理を食べてみてください。 Please try the food I made. 試す - used for trying something out, but it's usually used with a noun like a machine or food rather than an action. 新しい方法を試しています。 We are trying out a new method. しようとする - used for an attempt to do something. 彼女に近づこうとした。 I ...


12

「[誰]{だれ}にも + Verb in Positive Form」 is indeed in active use even among professional writers as you see below - whether or not one calls it "correct" in a place like this. So, my answer would have to be: Yes, it can. That is not to say, however, that Japanese-learners should use it whenever they feel like using it. In fact, I recommend that they not ...


11

Adding a peculiar "sound" at the end of almost every sentence is an idiosyncrasy of many characters in Japanese anime/manga/games. Most of these sounds are simply omitted after being translated into English, but there are a few exceptions. For example even in the English version of Final Fantasy, moogles speak like "How are you, kupo!", and this kupo means ...


11

It is the total number. I.e. now there are 3 fish. To get the other meaning, you can say 魚が三匹増えた。


11

First of all, forget that fansub. It's totally wrong (unless you've misheard the woman's line), and 通い詰めることになりそう has nothing to do with any idiomatic expression. Translating ことになる as 'It is decided that ...' is one of the possibilities. In this case, it's the matter of her prediction rather than the decision of someone else, and phrases like 'cannot help ...


11

If you just want to say "overrated," 「過大評価」 is the word for it. この役者は過大評価されている。 The antonym is 「過小評価」. 「高評価すぎる」 sounds a bit strange but would be fine it it were 「高く評価されすぎる」. I think 高評価 is used often in context that imply positive impressions, which doesn't match the negative nuance of "overrated." In general, 〜すぎる works for most of the time. You can ...


11

I think it's definition #8 of the 助動詞(auxiliary verb) "た" in デジタル大辞泉: 8 (「…たらどうか」「…たらいかがでしょうか」などの形で)助言したり提案したり勧誘したりする場合に用いられる。「この件は継続審議ということにしたらいかがでしょうか」 [補説]... 仮定形「たら」は、多く「ば」を伴わないで「雨が降ったら中止だ」などと使われ、「遅いからもう帰ったら」のように文末に用いられて8の意を表す。 たら is its 仮定形(hypothetical form). When used at the end of a sentence it indicates a suggestion, recommendation or ...


11

「そんなにゲームばかりして、目が悪くなっても知らないわよ。」 And your TL is: "If you play so many games, your eyes will get bad even if you don't know." The part that you mistranslated, interestingly, is not even the "ても" part ("even if"). Rather it was the unmentioned subject of the verb 「知らない」. It is the speaker who 知らない, not the game-player she is talking to. (I am ...


10

You are mixing up two completely different 「で's」. Particle 「で」← 「バイクで行く」、「家で食べる」, etc. [連用形]{れんようけい}(continuative form) of the affirmation auxiliary verb 「だ」. (Auxiliary verbs conjugate just as verbs and adjectives do.) 「[中国人]{ちゅうごくじん}で[日本語]{にほんご}が[話]{はな}せる[方]{かた}は、お[電話]{でんわ}ください。」 It is the second 「で」 above that is used in this sentence; ...


10

There is of course a good reason for using 「[先]{さき}」. Consider the two sentences below: 「アルバイトでピアノを[弾]{ひ}いた。」= It is your job to play the piano. 「アルバイト先でピアノを弾いた。」= There happens to be a piano where you work part-time and you played it one day. It may have been before, during or after work.


10

As for your broken TV, all sentences are correct and are emphasizing different aspects of your problem. Let me give some loose translations and try to illustrate the differences. テレビが壊れているから、見られないんです。 My TV is broken, so I can't watch TV. The progressive tense emphasizes the ongoing state of "being broken". You intend to repair your TV, but in the ...


10

It is a little remnant of [美文調]{びぶんちょう}, the ornate writing style that was popular for a decade or two in Meiji Era in the literary circle. The style has largely, if not completely, died out in literature but has remained alive in [浪曲]{ろうきょく}, which is a recitation of stories that sounds like a mixture of singing and speaking. (Please go to YouTube if ...


10

TL;DR From the given context, I guess the gist is something like: Dictionary owners know complicated things. That really makes parents happy they bought their kid a dictionary. The following is just my take on this, and I'm sure there are differing views, so please take it as one of many perspectives. “親も” This is a common use of 〜も, where it is ...


10

I would recommend a translation without the word like. 96人も遅刻するような学校なんだな So it's the kind of school where 96 people are late. Similar use cases: 困ったら{こまったら}すぐ噓{うそ}をつくような男だ He's the kind of guy who will lie as soon as he's in trouble. 口{くち}で言わなくてもわかるような関係{かんけい}だ It's the kind of relationship where you can communicate without saying things out loud. ...


10

Using the terms from snailboat's link: Not [force doing] He didn't have me wash the dishes (but I washed them because I was bored). Similar to → He did not force me to wash the dishes. Force [not doing] He had me not wash the dishes (because I'm really clumsy). Similar to → He forced me to not wash the dishes. Verbs in the form 〜せなかった/〜せませんでした are ...


10

やりたい放題 is a bit different from other ○○放題. It's an idiomatic phrase which primarily refers to someone's tyrant-like, irresponsible, self-indulgent behavior. Because it usually has a negative connotation, it's less likely to serve as a marketing phrase (except something like this). 母親が亡くなって以降、あの王女はやりたい放題だ。 やり放題 is less common and may refer to the same ...


10

In some sense, you can say なら is a subtype of ば. なら is ならば in its full form, and although this word makes no sense in modern Japanese, it did in olden times. Classical ならば is but a regular inflection of なり + ば, which rightly corresponds to today's であれば (である + ば). So we can see that なら(ば) and ば don't really have differences in their meaning as conditionals, ...


10

"に" coupled with the passive form of a verb will do the trick. I was rejected by him 彼に断られた I was laughed at by him 彼に笑われた In the above examples, the English "by" would correspond to the "に". The passive form can also be combined with the causative form, to form a causative-passive form. He made me laugh 彼に笑わせられた


10

The most concise explanation would be: A なら B means "if there is an A, there is a B" A たら B means "if A is completed, B happens" なら doesn't really care about the time order. B could take place before, while, after doing A, or all time during A. It just tells "an A must be accompanied by a B". In linguistic jargon, なら makes aoristic condition. ...


9

先 attached in the ending of words usually defines the place where the noun takes place. アルバイト先 means the place of the part time job. Sometimes Japanese even say バイト先.


9

Are my translations correct? I could not say 'no', but as a Japanese-speaker, I do know that you basically would never hear one of us say 「飲{の}み物{もの}はもう買{か}われました。」 to mean anything. It certainly does not mean the same as 「飲み物はもう買ってあります」. 「飲み物はもう買ってあります」 is a 100% natural-sounding sentence so I do not have to think about what it could mean. It could ...


9

The construct is more or less correct, but there are a few grammatical errors in your proposal. アメリカで9月間ぐらいに住んでいます。 I believe 住む takes に for the location of residence. アメリカに住んでいます。 「9月間ぐらい」 should be 「9ヶ月間ぐらい」, and does not need to take any particles. Also note that the 「間」 may also be dropped here in less formal situations. ...


9

You should parse that sentence as "『同じ料理が、「並{なみ}」と「上{じょう}」の「[2]{に}種類{しゅるい}」ある』ことがある". 並 is ordinary grade, 上 is high grade, 2種類 is two kinds.


9

A can have two meanings. One is the meaning of A', the other is of B'. Actually, I took A as the same meaning as B' when I read at first. When you say "歌が好きな彼が...", I understand that as "he who likes songs...". However, if you say "彼が好きな歌が..." I take it as "a song or songs he likes..." Generally, "Xが好きなY" has different shades of meaning depending ...



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