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12

The meanings are quite similar, but there's a subtle difference. Both phrases involve settling for something, or one person making a choice on behalf of another: お昼ごはんはハンバーガーでいい? "Would a hamburger do for lunch?" Or something is sufficient: そこにおくだけでいいです "Please just put it there [and I'll do the rest.]" But でもいい has an added sense that there is something ...


10

It's a contraction of 答えれば. More generally, eba contracts to ya: kotaereba → kotaerya  (答えれば → 答えりゃ) okeba  → okya    (おけば  → おきゃ) ieba   → iya     (言えば  → 言や) nakereba → nakerya  (なければ → なけりゃ) (As you can see, the pattern is easier to see and describe when romanized.)


10

Let's start with something common: 夢は夢だ。 'Dreams are dreams.' Let's negate it (using ではない instead of its contracted form じゃない): 夢は夢ではない。 'Dreams are not dreams.' は is a 係助詞{かかりじょし} ("binding particle"). Any 係助詞 fits in this spot. しか is also a 係助詞: 夢は夢でしかない。'Dreams are nothing but dreams.' The "modern" grammatical analysis of this stuff is ...


10

Apparently ば is Yoshimoto Banana's signature on Twitter (ば is for ばなな). A couple of other examples of her tweets: ψ(`∇´)ψ ば ですね^ ^ ば Sometimes members of her staff will write tweets using her account and sign them スタッフ so you can tell that Yoshimoto Banana herself didn't write them. EDIT: I wrote this up quickly last night, but I have this ...


10

No, you can't use だ that way. Here's what you're trying to do: あした   = tomorrow だ     = is げつようび = Monday Unfortunately, that doesn't work. Why not? Japanese grammar is different from English grammar. That means you can't put words together the same way in both languages. Japanese vocabulary is different from English vocabulary. That means ...


10

There are two separate things to pick apart here. In your two examples, as you suspect の is really performing two different functions in your two examples. It's only in 「泳ぐのが難しい」that it's really turning the verb phrase into a noun; in 「赤いの」it's acting as a placeholder noun, which is modified by the adjective. You can't use もの to nominalise a verb phrase - ...


10

イラクで戦争がある。≒ イラクで戦争が起こる。 The ある means [起]{お}こる, [発生]{はっせい}する, [行]{おこな}われる (meaning #12 in goo辞書) Compare: イラクにXXがある。(= There's XX in Iraq.) イラクでXXがある。(= XX occurs/takes place/will be held in Iraq.) Edit 戦争はイラクである。doesn't sound very natural but would mean "The war will take place in Iraq" as a response to 戦争はどこであるんだ?(Where will the war take ...


10

To understand this, you need to have many natural expressions on your active vocabulary so that you can fill in what is missing or left unsaid. Japanese is NOT a language where saying everything is beautiful. The only possible phrase that is left unsaid following [私]{わたし}を[殺]{ころ}したあの[時]{とき}と[何一]{なにひと}つ would be 「[変]{か}わっていない」. 「何一つ」 is always followd by a ...


10

In your second example, the direct object is 短剣, not 人の手に短剣. The direct object here can take on two different semantic roles: 花子が [ 太郎の手を   短剣で ] 刺す Hanako stabs Tarō's hand with a dagger. 花子が [   短剣を 太郎の手に ] 刺す Hanako stabs a dagger into Tarō's hand. In either case, the direct object is the noun phrase marked by を. Your first example is like the ...


9

Is either of コーヒーを・は飲み得ない, 飲むわけにはいかない more correct and/or preferable? No. Or would something without potential, like 飲みにくい・づらい・がたい work better? Hmm... no. 飲みにくい/飲みづらい might sound like you're having difficulty swallowing/drinking because you have some problem in your throat... or maybe you really hate the smell of coffee... Since that's not the ...


9

The ーし part comes from する, indeed. It is the infinitive form, or what some grammarians like Seiichi Makino call the "masu stem": the form of the verb that takes -ます. する → し → します なさい is the imperative form of なさる, which is a honorific word which means the same as する. Infinitives combine with なさい to form firm, but polite orders. For instance, telling ...


9

Textbooks vs. People. Careful speakers would not say ではなかったら, that is for sure, but not all of us are careful speakers and some of us will say it anyway. Textbooks need to draw the line somewhere and I feel yours made a good decision regarding this grammar point. More interestingly, the sentence you gave 「ここで質問することではなかったらすみません。」 is VERY tricky. It is ...


9

I think we say したいと思います to mean "would like to do (now)", and したいと思っています to mean "would like to/hope to do (in the future)". I think したいと思います/と思っています sounds politer (and humbler?) than したいです.


9

I think here あそびに means something like "for fun" or "for leisure". In other words, they came on a pleasure trip, not for business or studying. What may be confusing is that it's natural to express this in Japanese directly when you'd express it only indirectly in English. Phrases like "came to visit" or "went to see" generally imply that it's for pleasure ...


9

There are a few simple ways to express this. 「~~と(or に)+ [似]{に}ている」 = "similar to ~~" 「~~の + よう + です/だ/である」 = "like ~~" 「~~みたい + です/だ/である」 = "just like ~~" To use a slightly bigger word, one could say: 「~~と + [同様]{どうよう} + です/だ/である」 = "(very) similar to ~~" For the negative forms of the phrases above, make the following changes: 似ている ⇒ ...


9

The conjunctive particles ど and ども are Classical Japanese contradictory conjunctions, like the English but and although. Although they aren't used as much anymore, you surely know them from the modern けれど(も), and you probably know them from いえども and されど as well. They attached to the 已然形 (realis stem), which in modern Japanese has been reanalyzed as the ...


9

Adding the く to an i-adjective in this particular usage makes it function as an adverb so that you can use 新しい to modify できる. 新しく出来た means "newly completed." Other examples might be 速く走る、遅く起きる、赤くなる, etc. With na-adjectives you would add に to it instead of く, like 綺麗に書く or 丁寧に切る. Note that 新しく and its ilk are not what would be referred to as 副詞 in Japanese, ...


8

って is a colloquial particle and has two main functions. Being used as a colloquial topic marker (instead of は or とは), e.g. 人ってすごいよね。 People are awesome. Being used as a quotation marker (instead of と or という), e.g. 変な人って言ってたよ。 She said you are a little weird. 人って言葉は何か変だな。 The word "hito" is kinda weird.


8

In colloquial speech, 全然 = 全然ダメ. You can treat this 全然 as a 形容動詞 (I just do not like the word "na-adjective" because it does not exist in Japanese.). So, it is quite natural to say 全然だった in informal speech. ダンスとかあったら全然だったと思う, therefore means: "I think I would have been a total failure if I had had to dance or something."


8

Look a little closer at the link you posted. It explains this grammar structure as meaning "the situation A remains unchanged." This can have the meaning of "while" in English, but that's not necessarily a good way to think of it. In your example "妹は制服を着たままで寝てしまいました。" it is approximated in English as "while" because that's how we might say it in this case. ...


8

I think that the whole phrase "いつでも どこでも だれとでも" is being treated as a noun phrase, (or rather list) as if there was an invisible (ということ/そのこと/そういうこと) before the が. You wouldn't normally see が after でも, and I don't think it's anything particularly special - if someone said it they might have a dramatic pause or something after what they're using as a block ...


8

Nothing is being omitted. As you said yourself, this is not the kind of writing where the author would omit particles. It is not even close to being that type of informal writing. 働きいい means 働きやすい. This usage of いい is probably unique to Kanto dialect. It is not used in Standard Japanese, where やすい is used; therefore it may not be found in the ...


8

Your first sentence is almost grammatical. It has one big problem, though: ある doesn't take a direct object (marked with を). If you replaced it with が, it would be grammatical with the intended meaning: 昨日{きのう}テストがありました。 I think in this context you could also say 試験{しけん}: 昨日[試験]{しけん}がありました。 Alternatively, you can use the verb 受{う}ける, saying you ...


8

The verb すわる "to sit down" is a punctual verb (瞬間動詞). The word punctual comes from the word point, as in a single point in time. These verbs have no duration—they take place in an instant, representing a transition from an old state to a new resultative state. In the case of すわる, the resulting state is being seated. (You can read more about these ...


8

1) 私は東京の田中です。 2) 私は東京から田中です。 1) is grammatical and natural-sounding except for the pronoun part. 「東京の田中です。」 would sound much better to us native speakers. 2) is not grammatical so it makes little sense as is. To leave the 「から」, you need to add a 「の」 because 田中 is a noun. 「東京からの田中です。」 is the grammatical sentence. Between 「東京の田中です。」 and 「東京からの田中です。」, ...


8

In this case, 「に」 is not a location marker. It indicates the receiving end of an action, offer, request, order, etc. So, 「[君]{きみ} = "you"」 is on the receiving end here. 「[話]{はな}し」 does not mean "a story" here. Rather, it means "a word" as in "to have a word with someone". 「~~に話しがある」 should be remembered as a set phrase meaning "would like a word with ...


8

でもリトリートがどんなものかは、However as for what kind of thing the retreat is スケジュールをご覧になって頂くと、if you look at the schedule 一番分かると思いましたので、I thought you would best understand so 未完成ながらも while not complete 送らせて頂きました。I sent However I thought you would best understand what sort of retreat this is if you took a look at the schedule, so I went ahead and sent it though it's ...


8

Yes, you are missing something important in the second sentence 「よく道を聞いてもらいます。」. Your understanding of the first is good, judging from the TL. The second sentence, by the way, is 100% grammatical but its content/meaning is more than just weird. It is highly unlikely that a policeman would say it unless there was an incredibly super-shy policeman ...



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