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7

In formal Japanese, this is the standard 連用形. It's used in place of て form of verbs when linking. It's usage in 敬語{けいご} actually goes beyond this, with these suffixes also helping form verbs. In the context of your quote, both are replaceable with て form in everyday speech. The general rule being to take the ます stem, remove this, and replace as necessary ...


7

This 〜た is the perfect, not past; that is, it's indicating a time before some reference time, rather than a time before speech time: 傘を持っていったほうがいい。 Lit. "Having brought an umbrella would be better." That said, I don't think native speakers actually have such a complicated model (of comparing possible future worlds, one of which where you have brought ...


6

「[写真]{しゃしん}があった[方]{ほう}があなたがどんな[人]{ひと}なのかわかるし、フレンドも[作]{つく}りやすくなります。」 is a perfectly normal sentence with a fairly simple sentence structure. It says "Condition A will bring Result #1 and Result #2". Condition A:「写真があった方が」 Result #1:「あなたがどんな人なのかわかる」 Result #2:「フレンドも作りやすくなる。」 In 「写真があった方が」, 「方」 is used to compare (implicitly) two situations. ...


5

There is nothing incorrect or ungrammatical about the sentence: 「[私]{わたし}が[世界]{せかい}で[一番偉]{いちばんえら}いだって??」 because this is different from saying: 「私が世界で一番偉いだ。」, which is ungrammatical. 「だって」 in the sentence in question is placed after a quote, is it not? 私が世界で一番偉いだって?? = 『私が世界で一番偉い。』だって?? Depending on the context, it may be: ...


5

どんなに寒くても...(No matter how cold it is...) is correct, but どんなに寒いでも is incorrect. Maybe it was a typo of どんなに寒い日でも or something. You form the phrase this way: with i-adjectives: 「どんなに/どれほど+連用形(~く)+て+も」 eg. 「どんなに忙しくても」「どんなに古くても」 with na-adjectives: 「どんなに/どれほど+連用形(~で)+も」 eg. 「どんなにきれいでも」「どんなに好きでも」 with nouns: 「どんなに/どれほど+(adjective)+noun+で+も」 eg. ...


4

The suffix た does not automatically imply past tense. In this free online dictionary, for instance, it lists 8 different meanings /usages of 「た」. https://kotobank.jp/word/%E3%81%9F-556028#E5.A4.A7.E8.BE.9E.E6.9E.97.20.E7.AC.AC.E4.B8.89.E7.89.88 Sure, you may not be able to read it, but it would at least give you a good sign that you should forget about ...


2

I think you're actually asking about にする and not just に. に isn't a verb after all. It has a lot of uses, each probably worth a question of their own. Here are some definitions from Jisho.org: AをBにする to place, or raise, person A to a post or status B to transform A to B; to make A into B; to exchange A for B to make use of A for B; to view ...


2

Actually, there is no definite way of "parsing" a sentence, i.e. distinguishing the components : it depends on the context. See for example this very funny twitter thread about the sentence, where native speakers try to find all possible interpretations : 頭{あたま}が赤{あか}い魚{さかな}を食{た}べた猫{ねこ} However, it should be obvious that in a given context, only one ...


2

It is hard to think of an example where I would expect 思う to take an object, other than when thinking about something e.g. 母のことを思う. I wonder if the を here is the object of 育てる rather than 思う. It would help you if you could somehow forget the notion "思う = 'to think'" for a moment. I could be wrong but I feel that might be what is preventing you ...


1

I don't think there are any な-adj in the third sentence at all (only nouns, which function like な adjectives), に is used as a general location particle, and is not limited to actual places, the first clause in 箸を櫂にして川を上っていきました which is 箸を櫂にして would mean, "Chopsticks, in (in the form of a) paddle, is done" "In the way of a paddle, chopsticks were being ...



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