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8

Dictionaries say すぎる in this meaning is placed: after the 連用形 of a verb, like 動きすぎる after the stem of an i-adjective, like やさしすぎる and after the stem of a na-adjective, like しずかすぎる. つまらない is an adjective so I think つまらなすぎる is natural.  Generally, when すぎる is placed after ない: in the case of the adjective ない, it uses さ, like なさすぎる as you say in the case ...


5

I wanted to say "I want to hear Asuka-chan play the piano!" The easiest and most common way to say that would be by nominalizing Asuka's action of playing the piano. How do we do that? It is very simple. First, form a regular sentence meaning "Asuka plays the piano." 「あすかちゃんはピアノを[弾]{ひ}く」 Now, change the 「は」 to 「が」 and add 「の」 at the very end. ...


4

し is 連用形 form of する.It joins the two sentences here. であった is past form of copula である. So the translated sentence will be like "The games in ancient times were magical rituals which involved predicting the future of a person or king and deciding their fate."


4

「うん、もうすぐ[寝]{ね}るから。」 「から」 here is used like a sentence-ending particle, and that is one very common usage of the word in informal speech. We use 「から」 this way to make an announcement and see how the other person would react. More often than not, the speaker simply expects that reaction to be along the lines of 「わかった」、「それならいい」、etc. In other words, this ...


4

Yes, for example... ~ておいで -> ~といで e.g. 持っておいで -> 持っといで ~ておくれ -> ~とくれ e.g. 来ておくれ -> 来とくれ (← might be Edo/Tokyo dialect) Yes, for example... ~でしまう -> ~じまう (でし→じ) e.g. 死んでしまう -> 死んじまう (→ often contracted to 死んじゃう) ~てしまう -> ~ちまう (てし→ち) e.g. やってしまう -> やっちまう (→ often contracted to やっちゃう) ~てあげる -> ~たげる (てあ→た) e.g. 買ってあげる -> 買ったげる ~であげる -> ...


4

「[私]{わたし}は[警察官]{けいさつかん}に[犬]{いぬ}にひったくりを[噛]{か}ませて[欲]{ほ}しい。」 is correct if I have to choose between "correct" and "incorrect". A little more natural-sounding word order IMHO would be: 「私は警察官に、ひったくりを犬に噛ませて欲しい。」 for clarity reasons. Cramming the phrase 「AにBに」 into the same part of a sentence is not such a great idea even though it is still ...


3

Those are what I might call the "conjunctive filler phrases", which often add very little, if at all, in the way of meaning but somehow help create a softening effect (a good rhythm) that native speakers tend to instinctively "seek" in spoken Japanese. We use so many of those in spontaneous spoken language. A fairly comprehensive list can be found here. ...


3

「[如]{ごと}く」 is an auxiliary verb, not an adverb, but since it is in the [連用形]{れんようけい}, it functions adverbially. (The dictionary form is 「如し」, of course.) 「~~の如く」 means 「~~のように」, expressing how similar one thing is to another. 「山は[禿]{は}げ山の如く[訪]{おとず}れたモノを[食]{く}らうだろう」 = "The mountain, just like a bald mountain, will devour all who visit it." ...


3

"1. Can the てお -> と shortcut be used for contexts other than ておく (for example: お世話になっております -> おせわになっとります)?" The なっております-to-なっとります contraction does happen dialectally. You will hear it many times daily in Central Japan and Kansai. I am sure that it is used in many other parts of Western Japan as well. Around Tokyo, you will rarely hear it used. When ...


3

Here し is the pre-masu form of する, and equivalent to a slightly more formal form of "して". Here is another example of this usage: 彼はりんごを手に取り、食べ始めた。 He took the apple into his hand and began to eat it. In this sentence 取り can be replaced with 取って, though the former sounds a bit more formal to me. For the second question、であった is simply the past ...


3

だから is sometimes used at the beginning of a sentence when the speaker is trying to emphasize something already said. I've heard it said to me in this usage as "だ〜か〜ら〜". I think you could translate this usage as "Like I said..." To me, here the combination of だから plus 言ったろ (言っただろう) gives a strong feeling that the speaker is annoyed with the other person.


3

While what I am going to say will not directly answer your question, I think it might help so I decided to post an answer. The link posted by Pleiades above as a comment has a pretty good description of the various causes where は and が are used. The only problem is that there is still a lot of vagueness, and depending on your skill level in Japanese trying ...


3

As both Yuuichi Tam and user4092 have noted in their earlier posts, the pattern for すぎる after -ない can vary. Part of this is because the -ない ending itself has two derivations. One is from the negative 無い. (Historically, it's more complicated, but in modern Japanese, the negative ない suffix is functionally the same as standalone 無い.) The adjective つまらない ...


2

You should understand it as "I'm mad/angry at that person." Like if you say 私に怒らないでよ!you're saying "well don't get mad at me about it!" And the other way around if you say お母さんに怒られた。it means mum got angry at me.


2

My gut feeling is that the cause of your confusion is the true transitivity of the idiomatic expression 「[腹]{はら}が[立]{た}つ」. You already seem to know it is intransitive in Japanese, but you rightly translated it as if it were transitive -- "things which make me angry". Of course, you could have translated 「腹の立つこと」 as "things that I get angry over" or the ...


1

I teach Japanese, and have the basic particles pretty well sussed out for teaching purposes. I recently began to take up learning Latin. I had already encountered Korean and the almost but not quite mirror imaging of postpositional particles. But Latin for an English speaker provides the best comparison, but it is most definitely NOT a 1:1 comparison. For ...


1

...なんだから is related to のだ through various processes at work here. There is a simple contraction here, i.e. なんだから -> なのだから. Let's split this phrase up into the individual bits: な+のだ+から. The な is required before using のだ when the preceeding work is a noun or na-adjective; in other words, in sentences that would end in です (だ). This is similar to how ...


1

たら is a hypothetical particle similar to ば and なら, however it carries a different nuance. As you can probably infer from how the past tense is used (eg 読んだら 食べたら 使ったら), it implies that the action is already completed. Looking at your sentence, はさみを使ったら、 元の所に戻しておいてください。 Comparing it to the given translation, it is accurate. A more literal translation ...


1

The rule is that さ intermediates when the word stem consists of only one mora (e.g. な as in ない and よ as in よい). The stem of つまらない is つまらな, which consists of 4 moras, therefore the orthodox one is つまらなすぎる. That said, つまらなさすぎる is also accepted in practice. (edit: Some people probably find it wrong.) As for preference, I find both of them almost as frequent ...



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