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8

売{う}ってる is an informal contracted form of 売っている. In the 〜ている construction, いる is a special type of verb called a "subsidiary verb" (or 補助動詞 in Japanese), a verb which serves a grammatical purpose rather than having its literal meaning, and this type of verb very often contracts with 〜て.


7

売ってる is a contraction of 売っている. The い in ~ている verb endings is often dropped in casual speech.


7

っきゃ is an informal spoken contraction of しか, a particle. やるっきゃない means やるしかない. The particle しか is always followed by a negative of some sort, either an explicit negative like ない or a predicate that is semantically negative such as だめだ or あるもんか. Taken together, しか+ない means something like "only; nothing but". It commonly follows nouns, but it can follow ...


6

Though it is fairly subtle, there is a difference between the two. It sounds a little more literary and/or formal when 「に」 is inserted than when it is not. There is no difference in meaning. Regarding the kanji vs. kana issue, the author could have chosen to use either for both as far as "correctness" is concerned. It seems to me that he made an ...


5

暇としたら is not grammatically correct. と here is related to the quoting particle and for quoting a sentence, you want a full sentence, here 暇だ hima da, giving 暇だとしたら hima da to shitara. In any case, I think the next two options are better choices of saying "if you have time / if you're free" 暇なら、ちょっと手伝ってください。 hima nara, chotto tetsudatte kudasai which ...


4

なるべく is an adverb and the meaning is "as~as possible". なるべき is made up from a verb なる and a Japanese old auxiliary べし. The meaning of べし is 「~して当然だ。するのがよい。」 and so on. べき is a conjugation change of べし. For example, 明日はなるべく早く起きよう。( I will wake up as early as possible tomorrow). あなたは英語の先生になるべきだ。(You should/have to be an English teacher).


4

「なるベく」 should be considered a single word meaning you want to do something or want something done "as [...] as possible". For example, 「お問い合わせはなるべく短めにお願いします。」 would mean "Please keep any inquiries as short as possible.". The 「~べき」 suffix gets attached to verbs and means "should", so 「なるべき」 means "should become". For example,「なるべきようになった。」 means "It is as it ...


4

I'm not sure what you mean by your example sentence ... but as you state there's two ~そう constructions. These are normally called [伝聞]{でんぶん}, hearsay and [様態]{ようたい}, "seems like". According to nearly all the sources I can find, you cannot place a noun before the "seems like" 様態 one. And when you do so before the hearsay one, you need to put a だ. ...


3

て is used for runnig on two verbs. In this case 出る and 来る are run on, so it become 出て来る. This usage is often used. For example, 走る and 行く are run on, so it become 走って行く.


2

具体的に means "practically" or more literally "concretely." The addition of the に changes 具体的 to function adverbially.


2

Yes, it is grammatically correct. But if you want to avoid multiple がs like this, you can replace the former with に. 誰にこれがわかる? See also this topic about が and に interchangeablitily.


2

The direct object of のせて is 物語, and the sentence means "the musical evolves the story putting it on the songs".


2

"包み込むようにして彼を抱きしめる" means the same thing as "包み込むように彼を抱きしめる" or that you set something so that it wraps him and then hold him.


2

世話 is a fixed expression that has a deep cultural meaning. I don't think it will translate well without the cultural background. I'm not sure where you got "thank you for everything" as a translation. I would say that's a semi-functional translation for when it might be appropriate to use the expression, but it doesn't explain what it means to say it very ...


1

もらう - the most common use is when you express gratitude by "receiving" someone's action - 一緒に行ってもらう。 One more use is when you receive something from someone, as mentioned in the comment below: 友達からプレゼントをもらう。 受ける (うける) - when you receive something, but not personally from someone, such as e-mail. 得る (うる) - when you receive something non-material. Such as ...


1

The most common meaning of 世話 is care or looking after but it is often used in set expressions such as お世話になりました。 As you say it means "Thank you for everything." or "Thank you for everything you have done for me/taking care of me" but you might use it even if someone has not really done anything except be around, be cooperative and ready to help. It ...


1

The ~て form roughly corresponds to the concept of the gerund from English. It is a non-finite conjugation that makes the verb dependent on some subsequent predicate to properly describe when and how the action is happening. In particular, it has a few special usages with various auxiliary verbs. The main point is that ~て strips a verb of any temporal ...


1

すすんでいく can mean "to willingly go" or "to keep progressing". As for さいて行く, for example, "氷を割いて行く" means "to break the ice and go" or "to go breaking the ice".


1

As virmaior said in the comments, "bro" in this sentence is a vocative - it's used to address "bro". It's not the subject of the sentence. The subject of the English sentence is "you". Vocatives' natural position is at the end or beginning of a sentence. In writing, you usually put a comma to separate it. When speaking, you make a short pause. Thus ...


1

Additional Info I've always thought that if you use ある, you have to use に. I learned recently that this is sometimes wrong. There's a case where using X に or X で depends on what X is. For example: Aセンターで大きなコンサートがある。○ Aセンターに大きなコンサートがある。▽ で is correct here because コンサート is an event. 5階建ビルにオフィスが5つある。(オフィス: Since an office is tangible, に is ...



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