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11

「そんなにゲームばかりして、目が悪くなっても知らないわよ。」 And your TL is: "If you play so many games, your eyes will get bad even if you don't know." The part that you mistranslated, interestingly, is not even the "ても" part ("even if"). Rather it was the unmentioned subject of the verb 「知らない」. It is the speaker who 知らない, not the game-player she is talking to. (I am ...


8

~ならではの + noun is a set phrase meaning "(noun) only seen in ~", "(noun) unique to ~", "(noun) that can be done only by ~", etc. For example, you can say 渡辺先生ならではの手術, which means "surgery that can only be performed by Dr. Watanabe." (BTW, ならでは is read ならでわ) Now, this sentence is a cleft sentence where the person name is focused. When you say "この難しい手術ができるのは", ...


6

Often, especially in formal/written Japanese it is customary to connect two sentences using the pre-masu form (let's call it this way to be consistent with the reference linked below), that is, the -masu form without the ”ます” (for example: 食べる → 食べ、 行く → 行き、 and so on). Think about this very common sentence for example: 。。。して頂{いただ}き誠{まこと}にありがとうございます。 I ...


6

It's a phrase to express "despite doing it over and over". You can use it with other verbs e.g. 食べても食べてもお腹がいっぱいにならない、拭いても拭いても落ちない etc


5

Roughly speaking, 話す is close to talk or speak, and 言う is close to say. Sometimes they can be used interchangeably (like in your 千葉県の男性 example), but sometimes they are not. Saying just one word or two is not 話す. 話す is used with a relatively longer story, speech, opinion, lecture, etc. 話す is rarely used without physical vocals. You can safely use 言う for ...


5

No, you don't need it unless the sentence has どうして or なぜ. (Incidentally, わからない is better rather than 知らない here.)


5

1)「この話が事実に基づいているという証拠はある。」 2)「この話が事実に基づいている証拠はある。」 1) feels just wholesome and complete. It is something people would actually say and write in real life and it enters my Japanese-speaking brain without any constraint whatsoever. Just like Matsuzaka beef, I never have to chew it to swallow. 2), however, does not feel as natural as 1). I would ...


4

It's a common rhetorical phrase, though not idiomatic, to express total unexpectedness. 自分でも(不思議な/びっくりする/驚く/よくわからない etc.)(ほど/くらい) It tells that what you did or felt was out of your own expectation. You could translate it like "so — that even myself don't (didn't) know why".


4

"Make" is kind of strong as a translation. てもらう generally suggests that you are having someone do something for you, for your benefit, with implied gratitude. Also, as user dainichi also pointed out, while it technically could mean having someone sing to Shizuka, in all likelihood the speaker is talking about having Shizuka do the singing. You should ...


4

As you have correctly guessed, this と is the quotative particle and the part before it is a quote. 「少しでも長生きを」という願いをかなえるために、医療は目覚ましい進歩を遂げてきた。 A sentence that ends with を is commonly used as an expression which means "We/I/You need/want ~", "Give us ~", "Accomplish ~", etc., depending on the context. See: Making sense of をと Example: ...


4

「カッコイイのやってみたいと[思]{おも}ってます。」= 「カッコイイの + を + やってみたいと思ってます。」 「の」 is a nominalizer that turns the adjective 「カッコイイ」 into a noun-like form - "a カッコイイ one". What the thing is should be clear to you from the context. We have no way of knowing it here. "I'm hoping to pull off a good one." (I just used the adjective "good" because I do not know what ...


3

You've already gotten a lot of comments pointing you in the right direction, but why not also a more idiomatic translation; mind, this is without context, but I'm imagining some war / disaster / post apocalyptic situation. また、南町にコーヒー豆が入{はい}らなくなってきて、今日は、うちも休日。 With the supply of coffee beans again run dry in Minami-chou, looks like today's gonna be a day off ...


3

Try translating the も as "still". 持っていっていい? lit. Is it okay when I take it away/off? 持っていってもいい? lit. Is it still okay when I take it away/off? So, the nuance is the latter expects more possibility it could make inconvenience, thus asks more carefully on whether they don't mind. The difference is, however, minimized in affirmative/interrogative ...


3

The most natural way is probably: 「関係」と「関連」は同じような意味(の言葉)です。 「関係」と「関連」は似たような意味(の言葉)です。 You can also swap particles to say 「関係」は「関連」と…, in this case, the subject will be different but the meaning is practically the same. (In case you might wonder why we can end the sentence with 意味です even though they are "words" and not "meanings", it's a kind of ...


2

with a strangely composed heart, I calmly asked the beautiful girl before my eyes 自分でも : oneself / even I . It was strange even for himself, since he thought he shouldn't be feel that composed. 不思議なくらい : strangely / oddly enough / to the extent of being strange Just 不思議 means strange/mysterious, adding くらい modify the meaning into above explanations ...


2

?? あなたがすぐ帰ることは必要だ。 ○ あなたが会員であることが必要だ。 Construction like 「(subject + verb) ことが必要だ」 is highly unnatural, except when the verb is copula だ/である. In addition, ~は必要だ makes all that comes before は into topic (i.e. background) so that effectively put the focus on 必要だ. It'd mean "It is NECESSARY (as opposed to optional, unrequired etc.)" Likewise: ...


2

B, although I would replace "が" and "は". あなたはすぐ帰る必要がある。 As for your two other examples, I would also rephrase them so that "あなた" becomes the subject.


2

I have just read this part of the novel in the original myself in search of some context (because what the original says matters the most.). Here is the context/background for the other users. Tsukuru goes to college in Tokyo, away from his hometown. As he is not very sociable, he has made but a few friends in Tokyo. When he goes home during his school ...


2

This の is not the nominalizing の, it's the explanatory の, as in 「ちょっと話{はな}したいことがあるのですが。」"There is something I would like to talk to you about (explanatory tone)." When used in a question, it takes the reverse nuance of seeking an explanation, as in 「どこにいたの?」"Where were you? (seeking explanation)." In your example sentences, the の is technically unnecessary, ...


2

In this usage, という is almost an independent particle "that, called, known as" rather than the combination of と + 言う, thus no longer any point to retain original kanji (that symbolizes the "real" meaning). It's just like we spell English words anyway, into or nevertheless in one word for the specific meaning. That said, it's not a hard rule that you must ...


2

近づける is transitive, and its intransitive counterpart is 近づく. The te-form of 近づける is 近づけ(-て), while the te-form of 近づく is 近づい(-て). Sentence Y uses this intransitive version, in its te-form. No wonder it doesn't require a direct object. Sentence Z hardly makes sense to me, but compare the following two sentences, which are very similar in meaning. Y: ...


2

I would say "A wants B to keep away from C." as "AはBにC から遠ざかって(Cに近づかないで、Cと絶縁して、Cと手を切って)欲しいと思っている。 Please note that you need to choose the right particle after C. according to the context


2

I might be wrong, but I don't think the English translation you report is totally correct. I see 入る here as with the meaning of "get in", as in the sense of "arrive", "get in stock" since we're talking of coffee beans. The construction then is simply negative + なる(--> て-form) + てーくる. I believe that in this case simply てーくる indicates that a certain change ...


1

1)「この話が事実に基づいているという証拠はある」 2)「この話が事実に基づいている証拠はある」 If I were asked which way of the above two statements I would use when I’m demanding the evidence of a story to somebody, I would more likely use the former. It is felt to me the first one is saying “I have the evidence that verifies the story is based on the fact,” and the second one is saying “This story ...



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