Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

You can say: このグラフによると(orよれば)、カイロの人口はいつ(ごろ)から増えてきましたか? or このグラフによると(orよれば)、カイロの人口はいつ(ごろ)から増え始めましたか?


5

If I was asked お酒はどこにありますか? I might respond like this: お酒は机の上にあります。 Here, お酒 is old information (so you use は) and 机の上 is new information. If I was asked 机の上には何がありますか? I might respond like this: 机の上には、お酒があります。 Here, 机の上 is old information and お酒 is new information. When you say: 机の上にお酒があります。 both 机の上 and お酒 are normally new information. ...


4

As you said, it is a general question. Since it is asking what would you do when you lose the passport (the action is completed in the future), past tense is used. If it is a repeated action, present tense is used. 本を読むとき、あなたはどこで読むのが好きですか?(When you read books, where do you like to read?) This is a quite tricky one. a. This morning, you went to A and ...


4

If you're reading online then I suggest installing the Rikaichan plugin to your browser. Hovering over the words gives you the meaning and the conjugation of the verbs etc. The real problem is that you need to learn kanji. Trying to read hiragana with no spaces is a nightmare. The kanji break up the stream into manageable chunks. Also, become familiar ...


3

「日記{にっき}を書{か}いていたら(、)まさにお腹{なか}がすいてきた。」 does not mean: "I am certain to get hungry when I write in my diary." That English sentence suggests that the speaker always or habitually gets hungry when he writes in his diary, corect? The point of utterance can be anytime. The original sentence does not talk about what always/usually happens. It is ...


3

Here, 〜とかしたら is almost the same as 〜したら。Simply put, it can be said 〜お茶したら楽しそうじゃない? So why we use とかしたら? If we use とかしたら, there are possibilities for other options, while 〜したら explicitly set the condition. Ex. 次の週末に旅行したら、リフレッシュできる (If I travel next weekend, I'll get refreshed) 次の週末に旅行とかしたら、リフレッシュできる (If I do something like travelling, I'll get refreshed) ...


2

In English, the tense of the main clause and relative clauses is usually relative to the time at which the sentence is spoken. I waited until the bus came. You use the past tense on both verbs because both the waiting and the coming happened in the past. But while you were waiting, the bus hadn't come yet! So, relative to the action of waiting, the bus ...


2

In modern Japanese, べし is not used except for in some fossilized expressions. As for べき: Attributively: べき is still used, although with a slight dated feel to it. In colloquial contexts it would often be expressed as ~ないといけない instead. Predicatively: べき is used as a noun: 行くべきだ [sby] should go Or you could say that べきだ is a verbal phrase. I ...


2

I think your are right. The -なる form is attributive form of nari-adjective in Classical Japanese. We have many idioms and quotes in Classical Japanese like 健全なる精神は健全なる肉体に宿る # -なる: attributive form of nari-adjective 好きこそものの上手なれ # -なれ: imperative form of nari-adjective Poems (especially Haiku and Tanka) are sometimes written in CJ. And CJ is used ...


1

有名な「ファミリア」は人員も豊富で・・・ Famous Familias have abundant human resources... If a Familia is famous, it already has a lot of staff, too. 例文: 高い楽器は、音もいい。 勉強のできるヤツは、スポーツもできる。 不細工な女は、性格も悪い。


1

とは is used descriptively here, much like 〜とは違う. In this sentence, you should be looking at とは無縁 all together. 不自由とは無縁の生活 "life free from inconvenience" Not as easy to translate to English, but easy to see from examples how it's used in Japanese (see http://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/leaf/jn2/159809/m0u/%E3%81%A8%E3%81%AF/). It's a combination of the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible