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6

「〜あげる」 and 「〜くれる」 make it clear that there are a giver and the beneficiary.  「〜くれる」can be used to describe an action which benefits not only the speaker but also people who are intimate or familiar with the speaker. 「水泳のコーチが、私に平泳ぎのコツ(tips)を教えてくれました。」 「水泳のコーチが、(私の)友達に平泳ぎのコツを教えてくれました。」 「水泳のコーチが、(私が応援する)佐藤選手に平泳ぎのコツを教えてくれました。」 These sentences ...


5

It is not exactly incorrect to do that, but you should try to avoid assuming other people's emotions because you can never know them for sure. The way to get around it is to add uncertainty to the statement. Most commonly, at least in casual conversation, you use でしょう at the end. 彼はピザを食べたいでしょう - (it seems) he wants to eat pizza. You can also use the ...


5

I would translate 微妙な具合で to 'in a subtle way'. How 'subtle' is it? What does 微妙な具合で actually mean? The following sentences explain: 暑くはないが、涼しくもない、停滞しているような、それでいて流れの存在しているような。 全てが内保されて、中には何も存在しない。 矛盾こそが理論的であり、同時に混沌の中に秩序が成り立っている。 で here shows a certain condition or state.


4

I think it's because he (story writer) is seeing the turtle's action from Taro's side.


4

夜になろうと朝を迎えようと ≒夜になろうが朝を迎えようが ≒夜になっても朝を迎えても (more casual) 「~しようと~しようと」 means "(regardless of) whether ~~ or ~~". This ~ようと is like "even if~~", consisting of 意志・推量の助動詞「う・よう」 + 接続助詞「と」. This usage of と is #❷-4-ア on goo辞書: 逆接の仮定条件を表す。たとえ…であっても。…ても。㋐意志・推量の助動詞「う」「よう」「まい」などに付く。「何を言われよう―気にしない」「雨が降ろう―風が吹こう―、毎日見回りに出る」


4

When you are moved by a movie, you have already watched the movie. You remember the scenes, music, and the story. LA VITA E'BELLAを見る時 implies when you were moved, LA VITA E'BELLA hadn't finished yet. So it sounds like you were moved by something else (such as equipment of the theater or behavior of the audience) during the movie or just before it ...


3

That's a phrase anyone younger than Sherlock Holmes never uses. It's an example of 候文{そうろうぶん}, which had been official writing style until Edo period but completely died out around WWII. Both the wording and orthography are as old as hills (literally). Despite its look, not much particles are omitted because most of them are embedded in the form of kanji in ...


3

By ending the sentence like this, the speaker is implying he has something more to say. His wife died, his kids left home, and that may not be the end of his story. Or he may just want to add how sad he was. He may continue his story right after this sentence, but the remaining part may be simply omitted when it's obvious. 「明日映画に行こう。」「あー、今、お金がなくて…。」 ...


3

In most of the cases よく should be put just before the verb: コリアンレストランへよく行く。 I often go to the corean restaurant. よくあるご質問 frequently asked questions It sounds better. And when the verb is built with a noun, just before this noun: 日本語をよく勉強します。 I often study Japanese. よく検索されるキーワード keywords that are often looked up But you can also put よく ...


3

Yes it works. だれの can stand for だれのもの too.


2

と here means when. It's a conditional (A と B), where B naturally follows from A. See this post. The sentence as a whole reads like: Because of this, it will be safe when you hide under a desk like you would during an earthquake.


2

First, I assume you have the basic knowledge discussed in this question: Why can we use の after へ and から? In short, 平安時代末期から is like an adverb and modifies a verb. 平安時代末期からの is like an adjective and modifies a noun. 平安時代からの武将 a bushō from the Heian period (say he's a time traveler) 平安時代から知られている to be known from the Heian period 月への旅行 a journey to ...


2

I agree with you; I would interpret this sentence about サルビア as "red and beautiful", where 真っ赤 and 美しい are connected in parallel. 真っ赤に美しい (redly beautiful?) doesn't make sense to me, but grammatically, that should be how 真っ赤 can adverbially modify 美しい. The same goes for 平凡で埋没している. It's just "キャラクターが平凡だ and キャラクターが埋没している".


2

What to do you think about this parsing: (子どもたちが話している)(にぎやかな声). The verb phrase modifies にぎやかな声 as a whole. EDIT: The て form and 連体節 (modifying with a verb phrase) doesn't serve the same purpose. て tends to stream-line (one things after the other) whereas 連体節 modifies the things that follows. (子どもたちが話していて)(にぎやかな声), the parenthesis can't be placed like ...


2

[V1] + ては + [V2] or [V1] + では + [V2] is a fixed expression that describes two actions (V1, V2) are repeatedly happening in rapid succession. See ては definition 3: 3 二つの動作・作用などが対になって繰り返される意を表す。「幼い頃は電車を見ては喜んでいた」「姉はいつも洋服を脱いでは着て楽しんでいる」 So this sentence means that someone is repeating the two actions (壁面に罅【ひび】を刻む and パーツを外気に晒【さら】す) again and again.


2

Looks to me to be just the て that joins clauses i.e. verb-A-て verb-B do verb-A and do verb-B or, during the act of verb-A, verb-B The latter option seems to work better here. Living in these times, we know that wickedness is increasing more and more.


2

The first phrase is nominal. It is composed of 接頭語(prefix)「御」 and 名詞(noun)「来駕」. The numbers in the right side represent the reading order of 漢字. The second phrase is composed of a verb(動詞)「[成]{な}す」, a subsidiary verb(補助動詞)「[下]{くだ}さる」 and an auxiliary verb(助動詞)「たい」. The reading order of the second phrase is not simple top-to-down. This kind of reading ...


2

Yes, you can. Negative verb and adjective behave in the same manner conjugation-wise, so you can form it with adjective in analogy of ~なくたって. Your example is correct. Grammatically you can create ~たって from: verbs (positive), na-adjectives & copula: ta-form + って 食べたって, 行ったって, 死んだって, 勉強したって, きれいだったって, 子供だったって i-adjectives, negative ...


1

Another phrase for "reason" is "in order to", which is usually constructed with (の)ために. The shorter version of that is (の)に. 私は日本語の[新聞]{しんぶん}を[読]{よ}むのに[辞書]{じしょ}を[使]{つか}う。 watashi ha nihongo no shinbun wo yomu no ni jisho wo tsukau. In order to read Japanese newspaper, I use a dictionary. That's the grammar point used in your first sentence "sentaku ni ...


1

You're seeing a verb which does not really exist there. 一旦【いったん】 is an adverb which means "once", "temporarily", or "for a moment".


1

First, I'm going to explain about sentence ender ね (not interjectional ね). It has several usages and among them, there's one that can be interpreted like English tag question. But there's a function that's shared by those usages. It is to indicate that information accompanied with な or ね is your impression or conclusion through observation (including ...


1

This で clearly indicates cause (原因{げんいん}) goo で ❶-7. 開け放った窓から入ってくる夏の空気が、微妙な具合で五感を鈍くしているのかも知れない。 The summer atmosphere filtering in through the opened window. Under this delicate/subtle situation, his/her (five) senses (seem to) have become dull.



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