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7

「[自分]{じぶん}は[死]{し}ぬ[前]{まえ}に[一目思]{ひとめおもう}う[女]{おんな}に[逢]{あ}いたいと[云]{い}った。」 The part that you are misreading is 「一目思う女に逢いたい」, which can be rephrased as 「思う女に一目逢いたい」. 「一目」 modifies「逢いたい」, and not 「思う」. In fact, it is impossible to "一目思う a person" in the first place; It just makes no sense. 「一目会いたい」 is a common set phrase meaning "to want to see someone even ...


5

とこ is a coloquial abbreviation of ところ, which means place. In that sentence, it refers the troop, not the position. If he said it in standard(non-slungy) Japanese, It would be 面倒臭いところに配属されてしまったぜ。全くよ. I'm not an expert, but a division is far (about 10 times) larger than a regiment in military jargon. So this 部隊 may be a battalion or a company. I would ...


5

No, it is neither old-fashioned nor a form of きかなくてはならない. This form of ~てならない means "really, really ~". It is similar to the forms ~てしかたがない・~てしょうがない・~てたまらない. Here are a few examples: ワープロを始めたせいか、この[頃]{ごろ}目が疲れてしょうがない → It might be because I started using a word processor, because lately my eyes are really tired. いよいよあした帰国かと思うと、嬉しくてしかたがありません → ...


5

Both are correct for different meanings and/or nuances. 「[終]{お}わりたい」 is used to talk about something that one is actively and/or personally involved in. One would generally have at least an amount of control of when it can be finished. Example: You have been doing your homework and you wish to finish it as soon as possible so you can go play tennis. ...


5

1)「[天災]{てんさい}があれば、[日本]{にほん}は[苦]{くる}しみを[被]{こうむ}ることになるだろう。」 2)「天災があれば、日本は[困]{こま}ることになるだろう。」 Both sentences are grammatical and both make sense. The use of 「ことになる」 is very good and natural. If I may speak on the native level, however, each has a little problem. 1) One would need to use a phrase or at least an adjective to modify 「苦しみ」 to describe ...


4

としたことが and ともあろうものが are used to express the surprise of the speaker toward the (bad) behaviour of someone. With 私, it expresses something around the line of "Who could have thought I/someone like me/someone of my standing/someone of my position (would do such a thing)" Here are some examples from the 和英大辞典: 君としたことが, とんだへまをしでかしてくれたものだ.  You, of all ...


4

Recently, @naruto mentioned the phrase 頭が赤い魚を食べた猫, which can be understood in many ways. There is some ambiguity in how each word relates to each other. Among other possibilities, it could mean [(頭が赤い)魚]を食べた猫 (red-headed fish) [(頭が赤い)+(魚を食べた)]猫 (red-headed cat) The same applies here. Consider the following pattern: AとBとCのD As far as logic and ...


4

You can say 「X + は + Y + の + [5倍]{ごばい} + [大]{おお}きい。」. You can also say 「XはYの5倍の大きさがある。」.


4

Dictionary form: 「Te-form of Verb A + から + に + する 」 Imperative form: 「Te-form of Verb A + から + に + しろ(or せよ) 」 This is a common set phrase meaning "Do (something) only after doing A." The translation you provided is passable but is certainly not a very literal one. 「[早]{はや}く[寝]{ね}るのはいいけど、せめて[晩飯食]{ばんめしく}って[風呂入]{ふろはい}ってからにしろ。」 In this ...


4

I must say that your understanding of the sentence is 100% accurate. Rules regarding the use of commas around relative clauses (or anywhere for that matter) in Japanese are not nearly as strict as in English. Where to use commas is pretty much left at the discretion of each writer. The two commas used in 「すらりと揺ぐ茎の頂に、心持首を傾けていた細長い一輪の蕾が、ふっくらと弁を開いた。」 seem ...


4

The conjunctive form (aka pre-ます form) sounds more dry/learned/erudite/scholarly/formal. I hate all of those adjectives to describe it, but I think you know what I mean. It's of a higher register than the て form.


4

「[自分]{じぶん}で[日本語]{にほんご}を[学]{まな}ぶのは[難]{むずか}しい。」 is nice and grammatical. You could make it sound even more natural by changing 「自分」 to 「ひとり」 or 「自分ひとり」. Furthermore, adult native speakers would use the word 「[独学]{どくがく}」 to mean "to study by oneself". If you were a beginner, though, you would not need to know this word yet; It can wait. One would say: ...


3

There is no redundancy in this sentence -- none. If redundancy existed, that would be because you translated word for word by using a dictionary. It says 「でも、 そうかと[言]{い}って」; It does not say 「でも、しかし」, 「でも、それでも」 or 「しかし、それでも」, which would be redundant. How about "But even if that were the case"? 「そうかと言って」 is used to state a contrary idea/opinion while ...


3

「Mini-sentence A + うちに + Mini-sentence B」= "B happens while A is happening." B = [気]{き}がつくと[何]{なに}やら[深]{ふか}い[井戸]{いど}みたいなところを[落]{お}っこちているところでした A = アリスがふみとどまろうかと[考]{かんが}えるひまもない Above is the structure of the whole sentence and one's comprehension of this structure is the prerequisite to a good analysis of any part of it. You clearly are unfamiliar ...


3

「[察]{さっ}してくれよ、とボイスくんが[僕]{ぼく}を[見]{み}る。」 Does と in that sentence imply と言って ("Understand it please - said ボイスくん looking at me.")? No, it does not imply that. If ボイスくん had actually said 「察してくれよ」 out loud to 僕, the author surely would have expressed that using a direct quote just like all those direct quotes from the beginning. Besides, the ...


3

Don't treat 「とは」 as a single unit. 「〜と違う」 means "different from". This 「と」 is the one normally glossed as "with", although I can't think of a way to use that gloss here. When 「〜と違う」 is used in the outermost layer of the sentence, it is normally becomes 「〜とは違う」. While I can't give a technical explanation of why this is the case, I'd say the hand-wavey one ...


3

Question 1 可能です。ただし挙げてくださった例文は、実際はあまり使われないでしょう。なぜなら [明日早く起きたら] [食べられる朝ごはんはアイスクリームです。] [子供がうるさいので] [たまらない父はイヤホンをつけた。] という構造に解釈する方が自然なので、そう誤解される可能性が高いからです。 以下のように、被修飾語が最後に来る文であれば一般的です。 こちらがポイントを貯めるともらえる景品です。 「ポイントを貯めるともらえる」が「景品」を修飾しています。 Question 2 これも可能です。ただし説明にある そして「途中で何か良い物を拾ったら半分はヘルメスの神に捧げるから」は「無事に旅をさせてくれといったものです」を修飾しているのですか? ...


3

Exactly as you say. 「たくさんの[階段]{かいだん}を[昇]{のぼ}った[後]{あと}だったので[彼女]{かのじょ}は[完全]{かんぜん}に[息]{いき}を[切]{き}らしていた。」 "After running up so many flights of steps, she was completely out of breath. " The English translation from that page is not topnotch IMHO because it fails to reflect the strong causal link that you speak of. More specifically, it does not even ...


3

「[自転車]{じてんしゃ}は[楽]{らく}だったです。」 This is ungrammatical. As a Japanese-speaker, I do know that a few of us would actually say it, but if one said or wrote it in school, it would certainly be corrected. The correct sentence would be: 「自転車は楽でした。」 or 「自転車は楽だった。」 The former is a little politer than the latter. Now, onto how to translate it.. To ...


3

There are several ways to say it. Some of the common ways would be 「username@email.comまでメールください。」 「メールはこのアドレスまで(お願いします)。username@email.com」 「メールは下記アドレスまで。username@email.com」 「メールはこちらへどうぞ。username@email.com」 To a friend, you would say 「ここにメールしてね。username@email.com」


3

Roughly saying, you're right. Compared with 日本では…, the sentence with 日本は… lacks solid image of a grammatical case, and are likely to appear along with another sentence in which 日本 doesn't function as a locative case. e.g. 旅行するならどこだろうか? 日本だろうか? 日本は美味しい和食が食べられる・・・ You say 日本で美味しい和食が食べられる” から 変わった文, but whether what you say is right or not depends on what ...


3

Mr. Li is cheerful, healthy, and interesting." It would be リさんはあかるくて、げんきで、おもしろいです。 Yes, you're right. What I don't understand is how to connect negative adjective sentences, like if I wanna say "Mr. Li is cheerful, not healthy, and not interesting." It would be リさんはあかるくて、げんきではなくて、おもしろくありません, word for word, but it would be more natural to say ...


3

自分は死ぬ前に一目思う女に逢いたいと云った。 自分は死ぬ前に思う女に一目逢いたいと云った。 There is no difference in meaning and both are just as fine, since the two words 死ぬ前に and 一目 are just as strongly related as 一目 and 逢いたい, though the former sounds more dramatic and the latter sounds a little too plain to me. I think 一目 is more emphasized when placed right after 死ぬ前に.


2

Here, とは is just pointing out that we're defining a characteristic of the N700 group. (The と is the quotative particle, but I don't think that really helps in parsing this.) どこが違う? is not asking for a definition per se, but for defining a characteristic. Your translation is pretty close. Literally, I'd translate it as something like: Where is the ...


2

I will preface this answer by saying there is no hard-and-fast rule, like with most particles, about when to use と and when to use こと. So, I'll try to stick directly to the context you provided. と The particle と is used in quite a few ways, but in this particular case (haha, get it?) it's a quoting particle. 明日{あした}も雨{あめ}です。 It will rain tomorrow, ...


2

The sentence in question basically says that the soul is like liquid, and must be always inside some kind of container. A magician can't drain soul from someone and keep it on its own. You seem to have failed to translate the verb 留まる (=stay, reside) at the last. The basic structure of the sentence is "魂はあくまで~に留まる" (The soul absolutely stays in ~). And the ...


2

The only part that's missing from your question is the translation of 人生にチャレンジ. He's saying that if he chooses a チャレンジ "self-challenge"(?) for his life (rather than an ordinary life), he might get hooked on whatever the challenge is and he thinks that then he may not be able to get married. チャレンジ implies doing something out of the ordinary (e.g., starting ...


2

No subtleties, just grammar. First, 相関 stands for "correlation" as noun and "to correlate" as verb. Now, × 国民の平均身長は栄養状態と相関だ。 It's an ungrammatical sentence because Japanese postpositions can't modify noun by its own, contrary to English prepositions (but similarly to that of Latin & Romance languages). Grammatical ones are: (a) ...


2

You can interpret it as 『国民の栄養状態は平均身長と相関』だ but the 国民の栄養状態は平均身長と相関 part is still imcomplete sentence. Likewise, 「『Windows 10はRaspberry Piと対応』ですか?」 So, it's different from 相関している or 対応している.


2

[命]{いのち}と[引]{ひ}き[換]{か}えにしてでも [叶]{かな}えたい[望]{のぞ}みって そういうの[抱]{かか}えている[人]{ひと}は [世]{よ}の[中]{なか}に[大勢]{おおぜい}いるんじゃないのかな。 だから、 それが[見付]{みつ}からない[私達]{わたしたち}って、 その[程度]{ていど}の[不幸]{ふこう}しか[知]{し}らないってことじゃん。 [恵]{めぐ}まれ[過]{す}ぎて バカになっちゃってるんだよ。 To understand any sentence taken from a passage, one needs to be able to replace in Japanese all of the impersonal ...



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