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8

Your confusion appears to come from the fact that there are two different 「だと」's. 1) When 「だと」 is used as the colloquial form of 「であると」, only nouns can directly precede it. Here, the na-adjective stems are naturally included as well. 「[花子]{はなこ}さんはとてもきれいだと[聞]{き}いている。」 = "I hear that Hanako is very pretty." ...


8

Yes, you are missing something important in the second sentence 「よく道を聞いてもらいます。」. Your understanding of the first is good, judging from the TL. The second sentence, by the way, is 100% grammatical but its content/meaning is more than just weird. It is highly unlikely that a policeman would say it unless there was an incredibly super-shy policeman ...


8

「これからほんのわずかな時間だけ... テレビにおジャマさせてもらう事にした。」 The agent of もらう is the speaker, not television. The speaker is the one who wants to be the receiver of a favor. (In this case, he wants to make himself be the receiver of a favor by force.) There is no 「お[前]{まえ}たちを」 implied anywhere in this sentence. Is that used in another place in the same context? The ...


8

If the chair was chased, the phrase would be 権力{けんりょく}の座{ざ}が追{お}われる passively or 権力{けんりょく}の座{ざ}を追{お}う actively. Back to the question, this を particle means from. I guess you have no problem with 東京{とうきょう}を離{はな}れる (move away from Tokyo). Another grammatically correct phrase is 権力{けんりょく}の座{ざ}を離{はな}れる (move away from the seat). Actually, you can say ...


8

If a Japanese sentence contains a noun with high animacy or (linguistic) sympathy and a noun with less animacy or sympathy, the former takes the position of the subject. If there are you and the menu, you have to compose a sentence with you being the subject. If you say これで笑わせた, people only think you made someone laugh using the menu or someone made ...


7

Rather than emphasis, I think such inverted questions occur only in spoken language, because the asker wants to know 何ですか "What was that?" and just asks straight away. Noticing that he could be asking about any number of things, he specifies, 今の音は. Such inverted questions are so common that they're less a sign of surprise or "being startled" than properly ...


7

Having read it several times, I could only say that that is good writing. It contains no errors, ambiguity or unnaturalness; therefore, it would not cause any misunderstanding among the readers. Mixing active voice with passive voice in a sentence is nothing new in English, is it? Consider the following sentence. "Tofu is made by coagulating soy milk ...


7

The correct answer should be 1-4-2-3. You have probably seen the common structure "〜〜という + Noun" before. 「と」 is a quotative particle so you have a good choice in #4 with quotation marks to precede it. So, we have a 4-2 for a start. The only choice that starts with a noun is #3, making a 4-2-3 an sure bet already. The only thing you now need to think ...


7

Usually, です is a polite copula, similar to だ but more polite: それはリンゴだ  That is an apple それはリンゴです That is an apple (polite) But です can also be a politeness marker added to adjectives: あかい    is red あかいです  is red (polite) When it's a politeness marker, です doesn't inflect for tense: あかいです    is red (polite) あかかったです  was red (polite) The ...


6

This may be a weird thing to say but if one already knew what 「[Noun]が[Noun]なだけに」 meant, that explanation in your book would make pretty good sense with minor alterations. "unlike other things, [Noun] is special, so..." ↓ "unlike other [Noun]s, this particular [Noun] is so special that..."  「[Noun]が[Noun]なだけに」 describes a special kind of ...


6

「Noun + だ + Noun + だと」 is a pretty common way to list 2-3 items. The 「と」 at the end of the list is indispensable, too. Nothing to do with the question but the 「就職したらして」 part makes little sense. I would expect a 「就職したらしたで」 there. Example: 「[夏]{なつ}になるとビールだアイスクリームだかき[氷]{ごおり}だと、つい[冷]{つめ}たいものを[摂]{と}りすぎてしまう。」 = "In the summer, I tend to consume too ...


6

Yes, the two sentences about kanji have the same meaning, but there is a slight difference in nuance or, I should say, focus. Sentence #2 「[学年]{がくねん}ごとに[学習]{がくしゅう}する[漢字]{かんじ}が[決]{き}まっています。」 sounds more "neutral" or "generic" than Sentence #1. It does not place a focus on anything. Sentence #1 「学年ごとに学習する漢字が決められています。」, being in the passive voice form, ...


6

It would LITERALLY translate to (私たちが)話すとき/話すと、歌っているように(orみたいに)聞こえる(or聞こえます)。 When we talk, it sounds like we are singing. But to sound more natural I think you can say スウェーデン語で話すと、歌ってるみたいに聞こえるよ/聞こえますよ。 (Lit. When I speak Swedish, I sound like singing) スウェーデン語って、歌ってるみたいに聞こえるんだよ/聞こえるんですよ。 (Lit. Swedish language sounds like you're singing) ...


6

笑わせた(笑わせる) is the causative form of 笑う(笑った), so これを笑わせた。 means "(I) made it laugh." 僕を笑わせた。 means "(Something) made me laugh", so logically speaking this statement would be correct in your situation. これで笑わせた。 would mean "(I) made (someone) laugh with this." (I think the で works as an instrumental/具格 case here) (僕に)これで笑わせた。 ...


5

To answer the title question, I would have to say, "Yes, you can." If you lived in Japan, you would hear 「ますので」 at least a few times everyday and even more times on some days. We use it whenever we speak rather politely. When do we speak politely? We do so in business, in conversations with teacher/mentor figures, strangers, etc. 「ますので」 is needed ...


5

It means "after doing 〜". Almost like 〜てから. 両親とよく相談した上で、留学することにした。 → After discussing it with my parents, I decided that I'll study abroad. 家を買う場合は、十分調べた上で、決めた方がいい。 → When you buy a house, you should choose (it) after doing sufficient research. よく考えた上で、返事をするつもりだ。 → I intend to reply after careful consideration. There is some other nuance I ...


5

Japanese grammar works in a different way when it comes to forming polite forms of verbs and i-adjectives. For verbs, you add ~ます to the verb and then you form all other verbs forms from combined polite verb: つかれる -> つかれます plain -> polite つかれます -> つかれました polite -> polite past つかれます -> つかれません polite -> polite negative It is different for ...


5

ころ means "around", "about", or "(at) the time". So it translates to: At the time I'd just come back to London, ... Note that it's come to London, not come back from London. Other common usages include 子供のころ → When I was a child 高校生のころ → When I was in high school


4

Somewhat confusingly, double nagatives in Japanese can mean a range of different things. Sometimes it is used to signify that something exists at all, however little it is, as in the case of 疲れていなくもない or お金がなくもない. Other times it is used to emphasize that everyone did something or everything matches something, as in 声を上げない者はなかった. The former meaning has a ...


4

To form the polite past tense, you can't just add です to the non-polite past tense つかれた. You need to make the polite present tense つかれます into the past tense (i.e. ます -> ました) つかれました. That the ending ます inflects like any other verb, e.g. (present) はなす -> (past) はなした, is no accident. ます can be thought of as an auxiliary verb.


4

Your translation is correct. However, this が isn't the "but" one. It's the "softener" one. I can't think of a way to translate it (if there even is one), but it's often used to make one's own desires/actions seem less direct and a little more humble. Ex. 聞きたいことがあるんですが... → There's something I'd like to ask you... The difference between ...


4

Yes, it is grammatically correct. It's of the form 〜てみる which means "to do 〜 and see how it goes/turns out". 〜てみる is fine for formal situations (actually, 〜てご[覧]{らん}ください is even more formal), but the トライする is not. However, トライしてみて is not just "cutesy" either. It's perfectly fine to use in (most/all?) familiar situations. For more formal situations, you ...


4

There's a lot of small questions in there. I will start with the easiest ones. For how to get your place name right in Katakana, use wikipedia (go to English wikipedia, find word your know, switch to 日本語 = ...


4

It is mostly about the degree of likelyhood implied regarding the content of the subordinate clause. 「としたら」 would generally express a lower degree of likelihood in the eyes of the speaker than 「たら」 or 「なら」 would. The difference, however, is often fairly subtle in actual usage for many speakers. You could always lower the degree of likelyhood in question ...


4

□□したらしたで、+ ○○しなさい ○○ is the appropriate action under the situation □□. If □□ is true, the listener should do ○○. ○○ can be anything expressing request or suggestions. Example 2,3 are from Greek Fellows's answer. 1.1. したならしたで、正直に言いなさい if you have done it(=□□) admit it(=○○) 1.2. 電話に出(=□)たら出たで、礼儀正しく話し(=○)なさい if you have to answer the phone(=□□), speak ...


4

Disclaimer: I'm nowhere near being good enough at Japanese to answer questions on this site but since you asked, here we go: I think the animate/inanimate distinction is only a particular case. The general distinction is based on viewpoints. From A Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar (DBJG): "The speaker usually describes a situation or an event from ...


3

Could some hypothetical thing be true ? .... mmmmm, not necessarily. "Putting 2 more engineers on the task should get it done quicker" かといえば、そうではない。 It's a rhetorical construct, similar to what politicians and C-level executives often employ: "Do I think that it's a good thing that 200 people lost their lives? Of course I don't!" "Do I think it could ...


3

The main thing to take into account here is the ~てもらう that's used in the second sentence. With this construction, the subject receives the benefit of an action. To illustrate: 母【はは】に晩【ばん】ご飯【はん】を作【つく】ってもらった。 (My mother made dinner for me.) 先生【せんせい】に文章【ぶんしょう】を読【よ】んでもらった。 (The teacher read the sentence for us.) So in this case, it's not simply that ...


3

Since nobody has touched upon this: [Noun]が[Noun]なだけに is just one manifestation of a more abstract pattern, which is "[Noun] [(same) Noun] copula". 時間も時間だし、帰るか It's getting late, let's go home 性格が性格なので、友達があまりいない He doesn't have a lot of friends because of his personality The rough meaning is that the [Noun] is unusual/extreme, or calls for ...


3

から is really only used to designate the location/point/time from which things start, whereas を is a rather generic particle. Because of this, から makes the reader mentally picture a time range (今夜から明日にかけて雪になります), a motion (東京から大阪へは3時間かかります), a coverage (揺りかごから墓場まで), etc. In contrast, を just doesn't have this sense of motion/breadth/width. And so when this ...



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