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6

It's impossible to parse it as a relative clause because there is only one verb/adjective (ie, 見えます) in the whole sentence. As a rule, each sub-clause must have a verb/adjective. So the real question is: "Which word this 向こうに modifies?" 向こうに can only modify a verb, and 向こうの modifies a noun. Both can be translated as "over there" in English, but you need to ...


6

A(連用形)にA(活用) uses repetition of the same verb as a pattern for emphasis; the 活用 part is often seen as ~て or ~た. Here 凝{こ}る means to pour an inordinate amount of focus / energy into something. To give something one's all, or to be absorbed in. The passive is used here for 出す to change the focus from the subject (the person making the food), to the object (...


6

The statements in your picture have nothing to do with divorcing. 結婚する人: people who get married 結婚している人: married people 結婚した人: people who got married (≠ people who finished their marriage) 結婚していた人: people who were once married (people who have gotten divorced) 結婚した人 is interchangeable with 結婚している人 in most cases. 結婚している人 focuses more on the current state (...


6

Not wrong. The difference is same as in English. Sentence 1: この歌をお聞きになったことがありますか。 Sentence 2: この歌をお聞きになりましたか。 These can be translated to Sentence 1: Have you heard this song? Sentence 2: Did you hear this song? The first one puts emphasis on the experience and the second one on the fact (not so long time ago). It is natural for 先生 to ...


6

Sometimes ~んでしまう means some of actions that you do without too much thinking about the responsibility or afterwards. Such as: 飲んでしまう やってしまう いってしまう, etc. This may be quite similar to "unintentional behavior", but it is also slightly different.


6

I think in cases like [noun]+と言われてる the ”だ” before the と is optional, however to me including it sounds a little more natural and complete. However, saying ”〜大学ですと言われてる" would be pretty awkward in this type of context, regardless of whether you were speaking polite language (と言われています) or not. です could be used in a case where you want to emphasize someone ...


6

The former, かわいいのは私です is correct, and means "It is me who is cute." It's a cleft sentence made from a very simple sentence 私はかわいいです ("I am cute"). See this answer for details about cleft sentences. This の functions as a "placeholder", like it in "It is me who is cute." かわいい is a typical i-adjective, and it doesn't work as a no-adjective or a noun. かわいいの私です ...


5

That で in bold is the continuative form of the copula だ, as in "私は会社員で、妹は大学生です". So it's basically "and". 一人前 in this sentence means full-fledged, mature, etc. What is the etymology of 一人前? ふたりで一人前 literally means "(becomes) full-fledged by two people" or "full-fledged when there are two people". Riddles often use personification like this, and it just means ...


5

Repetition of verbs are very often used to emphasize the significance or insignificance of the speaker’s or hearer’s action. It depends on the context. For instances: 選りも選ってこんな品を寄越したな! – You sent me such a trash. 念には念を入れて調べてみろ – Check it with utmost caution. 言いも言ったり、あいつ俺のことを間抜けと言った - He said so indeed, he called me an idiot! 参った、参った! - I'm done, ...


5

I think you are confused because you are trying to distinguish と and なり while it is just a single word: となり, or 隣 in kanji, that means "neighbor/next to (as in living next door)". This should clarify your doubt I hope.


5

すごく is only for adjectives and verbs すごくあつい - really hot すごくつかれた - really tired すごい is only for nouns すごい人 - great/awesome/cool person すごい山 - great/awesome/cool mountain


4

In this case「多く」is not an adjective or an adverb. 多く is defined as a noun in Japanese dictionaries. See weblio(大辞林), here: http://www.weblio.jp/content/%E5%A4%9A%E3%81%8F There are other nouns that follow a similar pattern, like「近く」and「遠く」.


4

You cannot apply this grammar directly to an adverb because adverbs don't conjugate to ば/れば. But you can repeat the verb itself. 牛乳は砂糖を多く入れれば入れるほど甘くなる。 俳優は有名であればあるほど給料が高くなる。 服はブリーチで頻繁に洗えば洗うほど早く脆くなる。 服はブリーチでよく洗えば洗うほど早く脆くなる。 But unlike English often, しばしば doesn't work very well with this pattern anyway, probably due to the same reason why "...


4

恐竜ガール is a natural combination of words, but its meaning is ambiguous. A (human) girl who loves dinosaurs. A big dinosaur fan. Like this. A wild human girl who lives with dinosaurs. Like this. A female child of dinosaurs. Like this. Despite the ambiguity, 恐竜ガール sounds natural and "interesting" to me as a book title, etc., all the more for its ambiguity. ...


4

That である after 一品 is not "exists" but "is" (ie, it's the copula, not a normal verb). Have you seen expressions like these? 食べたのは5個です。 It is five that I ate. 来たのは3人だけでした。 It was only three who came. それを聞いたのは1回だけだよ。 I heard it only once. These are cleft sentences where the number part is focused. They are natural and common expressions, and can be safely ...


4

Came for dead rubber. The dictionary says: むこう〔むかふ〕【向こう】 4 今後。これから先。「―三日間」 But I'd rather say it's virtually an adjective in this meaning, for it's always followed by phrase represents time duration. 向こう半日 (for) the next half day 向こう一週間の天気 weather for the next seven days


4

bcloutier’s answer makes a dangerous shortcut! The truth is that は marks the topic, not the subject, and が marks the subject, not the object. Often, the topic and subject coincide, but in this case they’re different. 好き just means “favourable, enjoyable”. It’s closer to an adjective than a verb (though the two concepts blur together a little in Japanese). ...


4

This ように is used as a direction of someone, so I think a potential verb is used like 買えるように. 買うように is used like 私は彼に本を買うように言った(I told him to buy a book.) This ために is used as reason, so I think a normal verb is used like 買うために. So: 新しい車を買えるように、お金を貯めています and 新しい車を買うために、お金を貯めています are more natural than: 新しい車を買うように、お金を貯めています and 新しい車を買えるために、...


4

The two sentences in your example have slightly different meanings. Sentence 1: 先生、この歌をお聞きになったことがありますか。 You might say this to ask the teacher if he/she had had the experience of hearing the song in the past. In other words, "Are you familiar with this song?" or "Do you know this song?" Sentence 2: 先生、この歌をお聞きになりましたか。 You might say this to ask the ...


4

According to 明鏡国語辞典: 「ぶん【分】... 語法 『・・・分(だけ)、・・・』の形で、その程度に応じて他の事柄の程度も進む意を表す。『期待していなかった分 、余計にうれしかった』『スピードを上げた分だけ疲れが出た。』」 (In the format of "~~分(だけ)、~~", it indicates that the degree of something becomes greater in accordance with the higher degree of something else. 『期待していなかった分 、余計にうれしかった』"I felt all the happier because I wasn't expecting that."『...


4

「~ねばならない」 means "must", "have to". 「解決していかねばならない」 consists of: 解決して -- te-form of 解決する (or, noun 解決 + verb する + particle て) いか -- 未然形 (imperfective form) of the subsidiary verb いく(行く) ね -- 仮定形 (hypothetical form) of the negative auxiliary ぬ ば -- conjunctive particle ば なら -- 未然形 of なる ない -- negative auxiliary So ~ねばならない literally means "doesn't work if.....



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