Hot answers tagged

12

「[誰]{だれ}にも + Verb in Positive Form」 is indeed in active use even among professional writers as you see below - whether or not one calls it "correct" in a place like this. So, my answer would have to be: Yes, it can. That is not to say, however, that Japanese-learners should use it whenever they feel like using it. In fact, I recommend that they not ...


11

「そんなにゲームばかりして、目が悪くなっても知らないわよ。」 And your TL is: "If you play so many games, your eyes will get bad even if you don't know." The part that you mistranslated, interestingly, is not even the "ても" part ("even if"). Rather it was the unmentioned subject of the verb 「知らない」. It is the speaker who 知らない, not the game-player she is talking to. (I am ...


10

The most concise explanation would be: A なら B means "if there is an A, there is a B" A たら B means "if A is completed, B happens" なら doesn't really care about the time order. B could take place before, while, after doing A, or all time during A. It just tells "an A must be accompanied by a B". In linguistic jargon, なら makes aoristic condition. ...


9

「これは」 is an expression which indicates surprise, or something that's giving the speaker pause, along the lines of "Wait, this one...". Anything coming before a 「という」 should be taken as literal exclamation; so rather than 「はという」, the sentence really is: なかなか「これは」というものが見つからない。 Which means "I can't really find anything that makes me go 'This is it.'", or ...


8

~ならではの + noun is a set phrase meaning "(noun) only seen in ~", "(noun) unique to ~", "(noun) that can be done only by ~", etc. For example, you can say 渡辺先生ならではの手術, which means "surgery that can only be performed by Dr. Watanabe." (BTW, ならでは is read ならでわ) Now, this sentence is a cleft sentence where the person name is focused. When you say "この難しい手術ができるのは", ...


7

The way I think of という is that it effectively puts quotes around something. So when you have "結婚したという知らせ", it's clear that the "結婚した" part is being talked about in a meta sense. To contrast that, if you just say ”結婚した知らせ", that can also be interpreted as "the announcement that was married". Though people can still figure out what you are saying, I'd argue ...


7

We say usually 村上春樹の本はありますか?. "written by" is translated as "によって書かれた and ~著作の" but we usually omit them.


7

あげる just gives additional information about the direction of action. No, that's not correct. The subsidiary verb あげる implies the subject is doing something beneficial to the other person. So depending on the context, Sentence A may sound like the speaker is asking for a word of thanks. In Sentence B, on the other hand, the speaker is describing what ...


7

「[親公認]{おやこうにん}で[付]{つ}き[合]{あ}えるこの[状況]{じょうきょう}だけで、[奇跡]{きせき}と[思]{おも}わなくっちゃいけない。」 「だけで」=「だけでも」 in this context. It means "even just", expressing the fact that a seemingly bare minimal condition would actually look quite satisfactory if one tried to see it from another perspective. "Even just this situation where we can go out with our parents' ...


7

In the descending order of certainty: ~だろう = "I think (some clause)." The speaker thinks the clause is probably (or almost certainly) true. ~ではないだろうか = "I think (some clause), isn't it?" The speaker thinks the clause is perhaps true, but he's less certain as compared to the first sentence. ~だろうか = "I wonder whether or not (some clause)." The speaker ...


7

This is called 「[役割語]{やくわりご}」 = "role language". 役割語 is often used in fiction to "help" the readers/viewers envision certain age/gender/profession/social status, etc. groups. It is mostly imaginary and it relies on the stereotypes people have about others. (This is why I keep telling Japanese-learners to be careful with children's stories as the largest ...


6

The verb 切る, besides meaning "to cut", can also be used as a suffix to a verb in the pre-masu form (i.e. 食べ) to mean "to do something completely". Therefore 諦めきれない would mean "cannot completely give up". Other places where this is used are verbs like 待ちきれない (can't wait) or 理解しきれない (can't completely understand). Here is a page which has a lot more ...


6

Basically, the casual form is ~だからだ and its polite form is ~だからです. e.g. ネコだからだ(よ)。 人間だからです。 坊やだからさ。 The から is a 接続助詞(conjunctive particle), definition #1 in デジタル大辞泉: 2⃣ [接助]活用語の終止形に付く。 1 理由・原因を表す。「もう遅いから帰ろう」 (attached to the predicative form of 活用語. 1. indicates a reason or cause.) The から needs to be attached to the predicative form such ...


6

ところ in this sentence means "part". 笑うトコあったのか means "Is there a part which we laugh at." ところ means "part, place". For example, この辺に走る(走れる)所あったっけ? (Is there a place around here where I can run?).


5

sentence B below should be more efficient than the sentence A without loss of any meaning. If we take the whole meaning to be "I lent you money," then B is more efficient and the あげる in A is redundant. If, however, we take a more nuanced view of what A and B are saying, then A differs in adding additional information. The あげる implies the subject is ...


5

I think Google preferred "to be killed" because 即死 is usually used with sudden physical accidents like a car crash, lightning strike, explosion, gun shot, etc. Take a look at examples sentences here. In English, "to be killed" is frequently used with those (maybe more often than "to die of"?), while 殺される in Japanese is basically only for murder cases. It's ...


5

I think it would literally be like 「AはBにCから遠ざかっていてほしがっている」 or 「AはBにCから離れていてほしがっている」, but they don't sound very natural, so how about: AはBをCに近づけたがらない。/ 近寄らせたがらない。 AはBにCに近づかないで(いて)ほしがっている。 / 近寄らないで(いて)ほしがっている。 or maybe: AはBにCに近づいてほしくないと思っている。 / 近寄ってほしくないと思っている。 AはBにCに近づかないで(いて)ほしいと思っている。 / 近寄らないで(いて)ほしいと思っている。 ... etc., depending on the ...


5

1)「この話が事実に基づいているという証拠はある。」 2)「この話が事実に基づいている証拠はある。」 1) feels just wholesome and complete. It is something people would actually say and write in real life and it enters my Japanese-speaking brain without any constraint whatsoever. Just like Matsuzaka beef, I never have to chew it to swallow. 2), however, does not feel as natural as 1). I would ...


4

All of these sentences are grammatically almost correct, but you should use を instead of お for the particle o, and you should use は instead of わ for the particle wa. Here are the corrected sentences: ごみはべつのふくろにいれます。 べつのふくろにごみをいれます。 ごみをべつのふくろにいれます。 Sentence 1 uses the topic marker wa instead of o, and the sentence sounds like you're ...


4

(2) is unnatural because 解ける is the potential verb of 解く and it already means potential. When 五段活用 verbs change to 下一段活用 verbs, they sometimes become potential verbs and they are called 可能動詞. In this case, a 五段活用 verb 解く changes to a 下一段活用 verb 解ける, and it becomes the potential verb of 解く.


4

~ましてください is ungrammatical, because only one (in most cases, last) verb is allowed to take polite form per sentence to make that sentence polite. Since ください is already the polite form of くれ (くださる < くれる), no other polite verbs allowed. Strictly speaking, a sentence that consists of multiple coordinate clauses allows (or is recommended) to have polite form ...


4

〜[三昧]{ざんまい}: to be absorbed in ~ だと: Here, it means he was thinking about something, an abbreviation of 〜だと思って... 帰宅: return home しようとする: to try to do something (often used when the action didn't actually complete) So, putting this together we get a translation like: It was then, on his way home after getting his hands on a new game, ...


4

「ろうそくが[置]{お}かれている。」 does not really mean "Candles are placed." as you stated. That would be 「ろうそくが置かれる。」. 「ろうそくが置かれている。」 can mean two different but related things. Passive Voice + Present Progress: "Candles are being placed." ← Someone is in the middle of placing candles. Passive Voice + State: "Candles have been placed." ← Candles were placed some ...


4

I think the word "our", from "our believe" in the original English sentence, is actually referring to in general, right? If I understand correctly, you are making a philosophical statement that applies to anyone. If so, 自分 would be more appropriate. Also, while I think your sentence would be understandable by a Japanese person, I am not sure if it is ...


4

Yes, you can safely say 2年ぐらいだけ ("only about two years"). Here ぐらい means "approximately". 2年ぐらいだけ日本語を勉強した。 I studied Japanese only for about two years.


4

In my experience, when in the 〜て+くる form, it is more often written as Hiragana as opposed to Kanji. However, I don't think there is any major nuance difference. In the case when there is nothing actually physically arriving and the verb is used more metaphorically, like "わかってきた” or "頑張ってきた”, I feel like it is even more common to use Hiragana over Kanji. ...


4

TL;DR: Whichever is fine, but using くる is safer. You seem to know the basic rule, but just to make sure, this type of verb after te-form of another verb + て/で is called a subsidiary verb, and they are generally written in hiragana. What is a subsidiary verb? But this rule is not very strict, and every so often you will see people use kanji for ...


4

Here it isn't really ことになる as a set phrase, but [...こと]になる; i.e. you can substitute the first part from something else and still maintain the meaning here. 長い話になるが、 As for the "why not ですが", IMO using なる feels more like "it's gonna end up being" instead of just "is": This story I'm about to tell you is going to end up being about something that happened ...


4

Yes, but it's limited to a few things like in the accepted answer above, because of the に. Without the に, it becomes 誰もが: 誰もが知っているような歴史人物 — a historical character everyone knows. These are literary usages, though. In normal conversational Japanese 誰でも is used.


4

According to Wikipedia article 「日本の方言」, ~ちょる means ~ている in western dialect. It says that they use 「音便形+ちょる・ちょー」 for ~ている in 島根県出雲, and 「音便形+ちょる・ちょー」 for ~ている as 完了後の状態を表す相 (perfect aspect) in 岐阜県・奈良県南部・兵庫県播磨・中国地方(出雲除く)・四国地方・九州地方. And according to here in the same article, ~きに is a 接続助詞(conjunctive particle) of 理由(reason) in western dialect. They use ...



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