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8

No, the answer you got in chat is not quite right. 「[本]{ほん}は[高]{たか}くなくて[大]{おお}きくなくてもいいです。」 You would need to use 「も」 twice to make it grammatical. You could say: 「本は高くなくても、大きくなくてもいいです。」 The sentence is grammatical now, but it just does not sound very natural. As a Japanese-speaker, I could not imagine someone saying this sentence in real ...


7

No, that's a ren’yōkei 連用形。 A ren’yōkei mid-sentence is for coordination, like English “he sat, and…”. You can think of it as a literary equivalent of 「こしをかけて、。。。」 Kateikei is what comes before -ba, so in this case it would be kakere-. Full table, with sample context: 未然形: 掛け-  kake- (-nai) 連用形: 掛け-  kake- (-masu) 終止形: 掛ける kake-ru (yo.) 連体形: 掛ける- ...


7

The sentence sounds like double negative, but it is not. To understand what じゃないですか mean, simply replace it with です. But じゃないですか more sounds like you are not sure about what you've said, and you want the listener to agree with you. Here are some examples: 心配しないです: I won't worry. 心配しないじゃないですか: I won't worry.(and I want you to agree with it.) ...


6

は and を can be interchangeable when it is put after object, but there are some exceptions. The most typical usage of を indicate the word is object. すしを食べません。 means 私はすしを食べません。 which can be translated as "I don't eat sushi." And the most typical usage of は is to indicate the word is subject. 私はすしを食べません。 means I don't eat sushi. は also can be used to ...


5

Directly answering to you, Nara often implies something happening naturally, zu stands for 'without', so does the whole compound adverb stand for 'subconsciously'? 'without thinking'? No. First of all, Nara is 動詞/どうし, a verb. But in terms of your "something happening naturally" is correct, since we call this naruなる 無意識動詞(むいしきどうし), literally ...


5

Your question seems a little too broad to answer to, but some examples: I want to be happy. -- [私]{わたし}は[幸]{しあわ}せになりたい。 [ 〜に-なる ] I can be happy. -- 私は幸せになれる。 [ なれる (potential form of なる) ] I made him happy. -- 私は[彼]{かれ}を幸せにした。 [ ~に-する ] He has to be happy. -- 彼は幸せでなければならない。[ ~なければならない ] He should be happy. -- 彼は幸せであるべきだ。[ ~べき-だ ] He must be ...


5

First, permit me to point out a couple of words that you seem to be reading incorrectly. 大きな潤のある眼で、 in the big and wet eye 「で」 ≠ "in" This 「で」 is an auxiliary verb, not a location particle. More precisely, 「で」 is the [連用形]{れんようけい} of the affirmation auxiliary verb 「だ」. (As you are already reading novels, I assume that you are familiar with the ...


5

We have two totally different 「から's」 here. 「[人気]{にんき}や[知名度]{ちめいど}からいって、[彼]{かれ}が[選挙]{せんきょ}で[当選]{とうせん}するのは[確実]{かくじつ}だろう。」 This 「から」 means "from". 「~~からいう」 means "to judge from ~~". "Judging from his popularity and name value, it would be a sure thing for him to win the elections." Onto the second sentence: ...


5

This is a simple case of subclauses - you've still got one を per clause: [この道を[靴を履かずに]歩けますか。] 靴 is the object of 履かず, 道 is the object* of 歩けます. *Depending on your interpretation of を with what you would think are intransitive verbs. You can read more about these sorts of cases here: It seems that 渡る is categorized as 自動詞 (intransitive verb), yet it is ...


5

「そこにはきっと[何]{なに}かお[話]{はなし}があるに[違]{ちが}いない。」 This 「なにか」 is frequently used in the form of 「なにか + Noun/Noun phrase + Verb/Verb phrase」 and it means: "Verb + 'some sort of' + Noun" This would generally indicate that one has not found out the exact nature of the "thing" described by the noun (and one would like to find out more about it). It is only ...


4

のに at the end of a sentence can be rendered as something like "if only it weren't the case that ~" From your examples: 彼が出て行けばいいのに。 (Aw man, it would have been so good had he gone) あの建物さえなければ、きれいな景色が見えるのに。 (If only that building weren't there, we could see the beautiful scenery) A~ いいのに is a fairly common usage, "would have been good if [only] ~A" It ...


4

"Each theory has a different understanding of how countries like China, Japan and South Korea behave towards each other." 「[互]{たが}いの[理論]{りろん}はなぜのような[国]{くに}[中国]{ちゅうごく}や、[日本]{にほん}や、[韓国]{かんこく}を[始]{はじ}め、[互]{たが}いに[振]{ふ}る[舞]{ま}ることが[分]{わ}かることの[違]{ちが}っています。」 Vocabulary & Collocation: 1) How many theories are there in total? 「互いの理論」 would generally ...


4

I have to say your composition has many grammatical/vocabulary flaws and hardly makes sense, but I would try to show you some hints here: のような国 has to come after 中国や、日本や、韓国 "has a different understanding" → 異なる理解を持っています. Simple literal translation suits here. "how" → どのように, not なぜ (why). Plus, a か after the verb (振る舞う) has to come with it. The ...


4

It is roughly the same as 〜てもいい. かまいません means "don't mind/care" (from かまう), so it is literally I don't mind (even) if you 〜 = You can/may do 〜 = It's OK (even) if you 〜 So it's more of an allowance than a possibility.


4

The intransitive verb 届く (to reach) and the transitive verb 届ける (to convey, to deliver) are usually used with tangible objects such as letters. But it's also frequently used with words representing feelings. 感謝の気持ちを届ける convey the feelings of gratitude 君に届け Let (It) Reach You The second example is the title of a manga, and people can easily ...


4

Your first set of three sentences without 「は」 used in them could mean two very different things. This represents one of the soft spots of informal Japanese today. 1) "I am being unable do it (today) as good as I usually do." Today is an exception. 2) "As usual, I could not do it (today)." Today is no exception. By adding 「は」 as you did in your ...


4

会社の帰りに usually means 会社から帰る時に, or 'on the way home (from the company)'. 帰り here is a noun meaning the way back or return, while 行【い】き means the opposite. 学校の行きと帰りに本を読む To read a book on the way to and from school


4

「[逃]{に}げ[出]{だ}さん」=「逃げ出さない」 = "not run away" 「ん」 is a negation auxiliary verb. The dictionary form is 「ぬ」. See ぬ[助動] in https://kotobank.jp/word/%E3%81%AC-593884#E5.A4.A7.E8.BE.9E.E6.9E.97.20.E7.AC.AC.E4.B8.89.E7.89.88 「~~ように」 means "so that ~~". 「たぬきが逃げ出さんように」 = "so that the racoon will not run away".


4

"It's clear to me that [結婚]{けっこん}する is a change verb, but I'm not sure if 結婚する is transitive or intransitive." In Japanese, it is intransitive. You can only say 「Person + と + 結婚する」, never 「Person + を + 結婚する」. " All the dictionaries I've checked don't list 結婚する, just 結婚." Of course not, because 「結婚する」 is two words. For the sake of a smooth ...


4

の in 私の本 is different from one in この役立たず/お兄ちゃんのばか, but it is the same as one in "埃だらけのテレビをちゃんと拭いてくれない?" Most typical usage of の is like "(description) の (noun)", which the description describe the noun, like "私の本" which means "a book(本) that belongs to me(私)". In case of の in この役立たず, "この" is one Japanese word and の is not an independent word like "私の本". この ...


3

Directly to your question, I don't think the すぐ would make the sentence any more (or less) valid. When it's valid with the word, so is without it, and it's not valid, vice versa. Your citation from A Dictionary of Basic Japanese grammar When S2 in “S1 tara S2” represents a past action, the action cannot be one intentionally taken by the agent after the ...


3

Your sentence, あなたの名前はですか、 is both grammatically incorrect and rather rude (once fixed) as well. As Earthling said, to make it grammatically correct, you need to add [何]{なん} → 名前は何ですか The impolite part is the use of the pronoun あなた; Japanese learners are best to avoid this word -- as well as other second-person pronouns -- until they know when to use it and ...


3

I wll try to explain this without translating the words themselves as, I feel, wanting to translate should be the major reason that you are experiencing difficulty in understanding these words.   「それで」 is generally used to express a simple "cause and effect" relationship between two events or situations. "B happens as a (natural) result of A." It is ...


3

I think the best way to explain this is with some examples ため 国のために戦う ➝ Fight for one's country チケットを買うために3時間並んだ ➝ I lined up for three hours to buy tickets. 子供のための公演 ➝ A performance for children "ため" is usually used in the context of someone doing something for someone else, or doing something in order to accomplish something else. ように 再発しないように頑張ります ...


3

Since you are someone who is already reading novels in Japanese, I will be on the strict side. You should have provided more context either in actual words used or in the form of a side note. Why do I say this? Because we have asbolutely no idea what the thing/object/phenomenon is that is being talked about.  So, what is it that the speaker is judging ...


3

In this case, it isn't the volitional form, but よう(様). See this entry in the 大辞泉, sense 2 and 6. よう〔ヤウ〕【様】 2 方法。やり方。 6 動詞の連用形の下に付いて複合語をつくる。 ありさま、ようすなどの意を表す。 …する方法、…するやり方などの意を表す。 Therefore, 名づけようもなく could literally be interpreted as [there] not even being a way/possibility to name [it], .... Or shorter, it cannot be named or ...


3

First of all, "食べないとダメ" means "you have to eat," not meaning "食べないとだめになる." In this topic's context, "いい" is used when you describe your hope or wish. For example, "爆発しないといいな" means "I hope it won't explode."


3

Pizza without cheese : チーズ無しピザを下さい Shoyu Ramen without garlic 醤油ラーメンニンニク抜き With cheese チーズ付き Curry with Tomato トマト入りカレーを下さい You don't ask for sugar in your coffee since you have to pour it yourself in most coffee shop.


3

抜き is also an option for 'without': チーズ抜きピザ


3

I will skip the explanation of the more superficial differences in meaning among these words because @WKx has already done it. Instead, I am going to explain a rather important "hidden" difference in usage that would not be apparent if one just "translated" these words into English. After all, the three words all mean along the lines of "recently". ...



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