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8

The best English phrase that I could think of that would retain the nuance of the original is: "whether they live or die". You do not need to translate 「にしても」 twice just because it is used twice in the original. What is more important is how things sound in the target language. The first 5 characters 「人間なんて」 already tells us that the speaker looks ...


7

手前【てまえ】 has a number of uses; the pronoun being the much rarer case. Here it means "before" as in time. 挑みかかる手前な顔 A face one would make just before initiating a challenge. My eyes locked onto her; what with a girl dressed in a kimono being far from common. Our eyes met and she pursed her lips and made a face as if to say "bring it on".


6

You can parse it like this: (平民が、貴族にそんな[口]{くち}(を)[利]{き}いて(も)いい)と、思って(い)るの? I think it's like "Do you think that 平民 is allowed to talk to 貴族 that way?" そんな modifies 口(≒way of talking). 口を利く means "to speak, to talk".


6

First, I assure you that your translation is already good. You understand the sentence structure perfectly. One might question if your word choices of "disturb" and perhaps "this" are best, but it is good that you understand that 「そうして淡々と話す俺」 is a relative clause. If you had, as some would, placed a "mental comma" after the そうして, it would have cost you a ...


6

When you say 「A [対]{たい} B」, the balance between the words on both sides of the 「対」 is of utmost importance. Both word A and word B MUST have the same level of formality and phonetic impact. Ideally speaking, the two words should be both Sino loanwords, both Japanese-origin words, or both katakana words. Using this technique will help the Japanese ...


5

You need to distinguish spelling and pronunciation. You do this all the time in English: you're aware that two ("one plus one") and too ("also") have the same pronunciation even though they're spelled differently. Likewise, in Japanese, keep in mind that the particle を is always spelled を, even though its basic pronunciation is the same as お. を and ...


4

We have two different words here -- two different で's. Auxiliary verb vs. Particle. In the phrase 「[秋]{あき}の[風]{かぜ}は[静]{しず}かで」, the 「で」 is the [連用形]{れんようけい} (= "continuative form") of the affirmation auxiliary verb 「だ」. Thus, the phrase will surely be followed by another phrase in regular prose-style writing. As a title of a creative writing, however, ...


4

Where to start... 「どうしても」, in this context, means "no matter what". The nuance is "One has no choice but to ~~." This is an extremely common phrase. Regarding the "triple" negative, it is only "double" at best in reality. By the Japanese standard, it is actually only "single". 「[着]{き}なきゃだめなの」 Negative #1 = 着なきゃ, colloquial for 着なければ ("if I do ...


4

This is a remnant of the Classical Japanese form named 「[命令形]{めいれいけい}の[放任法]{ほうにんほう}」. 命令形 means "imperative form", 放任、”noninterference”, "permission", etc. and 法, "rule". Native speakers, young or old, still use the 命令形の放任法 on a daily basis, but very few Japanese-learners seem to be able use it actively. In short, the nuance of this form is "Do as you ...


4

When you contract te oku to t'oku, you're still conjugating oku, so the normal rules apply. The only reason this might not be clear is that kana prevents us from dividing t'oku into t' and oku. Subsidiary verbs following ~て are grammaticalized, and people tend to contract grammatical words. So naturally, there are a number of contractions of ~て with ...


4

Yes, all your assumptions about about the conjugations are correct. And far as comparing it to つもり, つもり simply means "intention (to do something)". It doesn't directly have anything to do with preparation or doing something beforehand. That it carries this mean in your example is incidental. With your 勉強しておく sentence, the preparation is explicit; with ...


4

"(Verb phrase A in た- form) + ように + (Verb phrase B)" means: "(Someone) does/did/will B as if he did A (or A happened)" 少し[拗]{す}ねたように[頬]{ほほ}を[膨]{ふくら}らませる = "(Someone) puffs out his cheeks as if he got sulky" [諦]{あきら}めたように小さく[頷]{うなず}いた = "(Someone) nodded lightly as if he gave up" [思]{おも}い[切]{き}ったように口を[開]{ひら}いた = "(Someone) spoke out as if he got up ...


4

かわいがる comes from かわいい + がる, but is almost a word in its own right. 形容詞 → 語幹 + がる = feel like / act like 形容詞 寒がる・暑がる・偉がる … かわいがりたい comes from かわいがる + たい 動詞 → 連用形 + たい = want (to do) したい・行きたい・帰りたい … 気持ちを抑える control one's feelings 気持ちを/が抑えられない unable to control one's feelings 桃香を可愛がりたい want to fawn over Momoka ⇒ (Someone) can't resist the desire to fawn ...


4

One cannot combine 「[慣]{な}れる」 with 「なる」. 「[寒]{さむ}くなる」 is fine because 「寒い/寒く」 is an adjective. 「慣れる」 is a verb. To express "to get accustomed to", you can say: 「慣れてくる」 and 「慣れていく」. No other forms could express the "get" part of "to get accustomed to" nearly as closely as these two. 「[大学生活]{だいがくせいかつ}にも慣れてきました。」 = "I am getting used to my ...


4

I think the として in 固定資産として means "as" (meaning 3) 必要として is the て-form of 必要とする(to need; to require). (or, 必要としている is the progressive form of 必要とする.)


4

「だらけ」 has the connotation of being "all over the place" or being "riddled with" . The speaker that chooses this word wants to imply that he's not happy that there's so much of .     「ここは男性だらけやんか!」     This has the idea of "There's nothin' but friggin' dudes up in this place!" i.e. "sausagefest" 「ばかり」 can be simply thought of as "only" in kind of a ...


4

Tenses generally do not correspond well between English and Japanese. Japanese-speakers usually just use the present tense to talk about near future events and we could always tell from the context. Natural-sounding Japanese sentences for "You will not feel good if you eat such food." would be:  「そんなもの[食]{た}べてると[元気]{げんき}になれないよ。」  ...


3

[裏切]{うら・ぎ}り is just the noun form of the verb [裏切]{うら・ぎ}る. So to describe a backstabbing person (backstabber), you can just say [裏切]{うら・ぎ}る(者{もの}・人{ひと}). Although there is also the special compound noun [裏切]{うら・ぎ}り者{もの} for the same meaning. There's a slight usage nuance that I can't quite put into words, but it's not so big that it's something to worry ...


3

According to a dictionary... 1. ならびに ならびに ([接続]{せつぞく}): [二]{ふた}つの[事柄]{ことがら}を[結]{むす}び[付]{つ}けて,[並列]{へいれつ}の[関係]{かんけい}にあることを[表]{あらわ}す。および。また。 (From Daijirin Dictionary) Translation: ならびに (Conj.): Used to express that two things are connected and linguistically parallel. Similar to および and また. 2. かつ かつ ([副]{ふく}): ...


3

If you are referring to whether a person has ever done something, then the 「x ~たことがあります」form is what you need. Interpreted, it means "to have an instance wherein (subject) did (x)". ヨークシャープディング食べたことある? / を食べた ことが ありますか? These ask if the other person has had the experience of eating Yorkshire pudding. However, as you are probably aware, the first form ...


3

なの? is the plain form of ですか?, not a negative. どうしても can be understood as "no matter what" in this context. Is that enough to help you understand the meaning of the sentence?


3

My answer is based on the assumption that the sentence in question has been correctly transcribed. 「お[姉]{ねえ}やんに[会]{あ}ったら、もっと[惨]{みじ}めな[気持]{きも}ちになった。」 can only mean one thing with or without any further context. It means: "When I met you, my older sister, I felt more miserable." to borrow your own TL. A native speaker would never say ...


2

よう(だ) in this sentence is used to express inference based on reliable information (often based on what the speaker sees) or similarity. It is not the volitional form of a verb. You can translate it as "look like", "look as if", "seem", "be like", etc. It is often used with まるで which gives it more emphatic meaning "just like", "exactly as if". A verb can ...


2

The sense of both verbs is active rather than passive sense. In that case "live or die as they might" could be a closer interpretation. It may refer to the fact that humans barely live longer than a hundred years despite their best efforts, and nothing that they do lasts more than a century (thus the "die as they might" part). As for 「~にしても」, it might make ...


2

It might help to think about what's going on with 「ておく」 and 「とく」 in romaji. " 勉強 shiteoku " The we just drop the 'e' ('cause we're cool kids)... " 勉強 shitoku " The same kind of thing happens all the time with 「い」"i" 「何食べている?」 becomes 「何たべてる?」 (just drop the 「い」) "Nani tabeteiru?" becomes "Nani tabeteru?" (Just drop the 'i') This can seem more ...


1

As the noun form, it can also be used simply like this. 彼の裏切りにカッとした。 (I, or someone else) flew into a rage at his betrayal.


1

You can't use 「がる」in the following context: 「風邪気味だ」= "I feel like I'm getting a cold" (The situation appears as if someone's getting a cold.) You can't use 「気味」in the following context: 「なにか甘いもの食べたがっている」 = "He looks like he wants something sweet" (The situation appears as if somebody wants something sweet to eat.) The speaker can use both phrases to ...


1

I am not sure about the actual rules, but normally you use だらけ when saying about something in the negative context, such as ゴミだらけ. On the other hand ばかり is more neutral, such as お菓子ばかり。 Also, there's third word, ずくめ which is used mostly in the positive context.


1

Please allow me to address practicality. Colloquially, we use ~の事 often. It makes a good padding in conversation and it sounds natural. I dunno what others think, but, in writing, I find using ~の事 frequently makes you sound a little inarticulate. As we can overuse the term, if you write like how you speak, you could be littering with the terms in your ...


1

You can break なの down into the formal noun の and the adnominal copula な (i.e., a form of だ which shows up before nouns). Your sentence: Basically, the sentence (彼が)男の子だ is embedded into は知ってる by turning it into a noun using の.   (彼が)男の子だ ⇒[(彼が)男の子な]のは知ってる Alternatives: You could also write it as 男の子であるのは知ってる "I know that he's a boy." which ...



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