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11

It is the total number. I.e. now there are 3 fish. To get the other meaning, you can say 魚が三匹増えた。


11

First of all, forget that fansub. It's totally wrong (unless you've misheard the woman's line), and 通い詰めることになりそう has nothing to do with any idiomatic expression. Translating ことになる as 'It is decided that ...' is one of the possibilities. In this case, it's the matter of her prediction rather than the decision of someone else, and phrases like 'cannot help ...


8

I think the difference is somehow similar to that between ice cream and iced cream, or popcorn and popped corn. When you combine two nouns directly, it becomes one fixed idea. 日本料理 is the name of traditionally recognized Japanese local cuisine, in the same way French cuisine, Chinese cuisine or Turkish cuisine are. It includes sushi, soba, tempura etc. ...


7

「たくさんの本を読んで」 and 「本をたくさん読んで」 have the same meaning which is "read many books then...", "because of reading many books, ..." or something like that, I think. たくさん in 「たくさんの本を読んで」 is a noun. たくさん in 「本をたくさん読んで」 is a noun originally, but it's working as an adverb here. Which たくさん should be used in a sentence depends on the context or the other words in the ...


6

Many Japanese active sentences are better translated into English using passive voice, and vice versa. One well-known example is already found in your question: I was surprised. 私は驚【おどろ】いた。 Where 驚く is an intransitive verb, and 'surprise' is a transitive verb. (We also have the transitive version 驚かす, but we say 私は驚かされた far less frequently than ...


6

You would use [年上]{とし・うえ} for older and [年下]{とし・した} for younger. 僕は彼女より2歳年上だ。 → I'm two years older than my girlfriend. 妹は私より5歳年下です。 → My sister is five years younger than I. You can also use them by themselves. 花子さんには年下の[旦那]{だん・な}さんがいる。 → Hanako has a younger husband. 翔平は兄弟の中で一番年上だ。 → Shōhei is the oldest of his siblings.


6

When someone believes you, they are giving you their belief. English has a similar phrase, "to give the benefit of the doubt." くれる, もらう, and so on are not restricted to physical gifts; they are quite flexible. Why is くれる needed in this sentence? I don't think it is needed exactly, but it provides context and flavor by implying that the speaker was the one ...


6

I might suggest a slightly different nuance in understanding the [補助動詞]{ほじょどうし} くれる. In question forms, it asks whether someone would do something for the speaker. In the past tense, it expresses when the speaker's judgment that he received some benefit from the action of the main verb. Thus, アイスを買ってくれた。 is not merely "he bought ice cream" , but ...


6

「〜あげる」 and 「〜くれる」 make it clear that there are a giver and the beneficiary.  「〜くれる」can be used to describe an action which benefits not only the speaker but also people who are intimate or familiar with the speaker. 「水泳のコーチが、私に平泳ぎのコツ(tips)を教えてくれました。」 「水泳のコーチが、(私の)友達に平泳ぎのコツを教えてくれました。」 「水泳のコーチが、(私が応援する)佐藤選手に平泳ぎのコツを教えてくれました。」 These sentences ...


5

Yes, you do have to change it. It is ungrammatical for だ to appear at the end of a relative clause. If you need to have a (present-tense) copula at the end of a relative clause, it must be changed to either な or の. Which of these it changes to will depend on the noun attached to it---some turn into into な (like 好き or きれい), some turn it into の (like 普通 or ...


5

You seem to be misunderstood about this and it is indeed a fairly common misconception. 「na-adjective + だ」 In na-adjectives, the 「~~だ」 form is the 終止形{しゅうしけい} (predicative form), meaning it is used to end a sentence. Thus, it cannot be used to end a relative clause in front of its final noun. 「na-adjective + な」 This is the 連体形{れんたいけい} ...


5

You should parse it as: と、この状況で思っちゃう僕は・・・ The と is the quotative particle.


5

There is certainly a difference between the two, but whether it could be called "significant" or not would be up to each individual. 「便利{べんり}な安{やす}い物{もの}」 「便利な」 is in the 連体形{れんたいけい}(attributive form); therefore, the native ears would instinctively expect a noun to follow. 「安い物」, even though it is technically in the "adjective + noun" form, would ...


5

It is not exactly incorrect to do that, but you should try to avoid assuming other people's emotions because you can never know them for sure. The way to get around it is to add uncertainty to the statement. Most commonly, at least in casual conversation, you use でしょう at the end. 彼はピザを食べたいでしょう - (it seems) he wants to eat pizza. You can also use the ...


5

I would translate 微妙な具合で to 'in a subtle way'. How 'subtle' is it? What does 微妙な具合で actually mean? The following sentences explain: 暑くはないが、涼しくもない、停滞しているような、それでいて流れの存在しているような。 全てが内保されて、中には何も存在しない。 矛盾こそが理論的であり、同時に混沌の中に秩序が成り立っている。 で here shows a certain condition or state.


4

じゃ is the contraction of では. It's a contraction, because じゃ is one mora (one unit length) and では is two moras long. じゃ is frequently used as contraction of では, especially in じゃない < ではない. As pointed out before by one of our native speakers on this site (@l'électeur), じゃありません is at risk of being overused by learners. Presumably, because the uncontracted では ...


4

I think it basically comes down to context. Literate native speakers can usually read most or all of the words on a page, and because they recognize most of the words, when they come to something unknown, they can generally figure out from context what the function of that unknown thing is in a sentence. For example, if it seems to be the subject of a verb ...


4

Marking it with は is certainly not wrong, and would in fact be natural. It doesn't change the meaning, but if the は is stressed, it will contrast yesterday to all other days, and will thus put stress on the time: 昨日勉強しましたか - Did you study yesterday? (Plain question) 昨日は勉強しましたか - Did you study yesterday? (As opposed to any other day) However, if the は ...


4

One could argue that 思う has meanings other than "to think", such as "feel" or "regard", but they all boil down to thinking and emotions. The reason you hear it so often actually isn't because it has separate meanings. You hear it a lot because it shows the speaker is uncertain or has quoted an opinion and is not necessarily a fact. This makes it great for ...


4

It's all about emphasis. Plain and simple 簡単です: "It's easy". But that's a bit abrupt for the Japanese speaker who doesn't want you to feel stupid that you need to have it explained, so s(he) says instead... 簡単ですね: "It's easy, isn't it?" This creates a little fiction that instead of telling you something you don't know and thus exposing your ignorance, he ...


4

夜になろうと朝を迎えようと ≒夜になろうが朝を迎えようが ≒夜になっても朝を迎えても (more casual) 「~しようと~しようと」 means "(regardless of) whether ~~ or ~~". This ~ようと is like "even if~~", consisting of 意志・推量の助動詞「う・よう」 + 接続助詞「と」. This usage of と is #❷-4-ア on goo辞書: 逆接の仮定条件を表す。たとえ…であっても。…ても。㋐意志・推量の助動詞「う」「よう」「まい」などに付く。「何を言われよう―気にしない」「雨が降ろう―風が吹こう―、毎日見回りに出る」


4

I think it's because he (story writer) is seeing the turtle's action from Taro's side.


4

When you are moved by a movie, you have already watched the movie. You remember the scenes, music, and the story. LA VITA E'BELLAを見る時 implies when you were moved, LA VITA E'BELLA hadn't finished yet. So it sounds like you were moved by something else (such as equipment of the theater or behavior of the audience) during the movie or just before it ...


4

The first phrase is nominal. It is composed of 接頭語(prefix)「御」 and 名詞(noun)「来駕」. The numbers in the right side represent the reading order of 漢字. The second phrase is composed of a verb(動詞)「[成]{な}す」, a subsidiary verb(補助動詞)「[下]{くだ}さる」 and an auxiliary verb(助動詞)「たい」. The reading order of the second phrase is not simple top-to-down. This kind of reading ...


4

はやい is an adjective. You can't use it to modify a verb (おきる) like this. It only modifies nouns. early describes how the the waking up was done, therefore you need to use an adverb. To change an i-adjective into an adverb replace the final い with く, so your sentence becomes わたしは あまり はやく おきません。


3

We have two very different 「今日{きょう}も一日{いちにち}」's here. 「今日も一日の締{し}めくくりとばかりに酒盛{さかも}りに耽{ふけ}っている。」 = 「今日も、一日の締{し}めくくりとばかりに酒盛{さかも}りに耽{ふけ}っている。」 ≒ 「一日の締めくくりとばかりに,今日も酒盛りに耽っている。」 Here, 「今日も ("today also")」 and 「一日 (the "work" day)」 function separately and independently from each other. Grammatically, it is not the same 「今日も一日」 that we use very ...


3

"山を登ったり、降りたり、よく考えた。" is an unnatural sentence. If it's something like 山を登ったり、降りたり、よく遊んだ, you can interpret that the concrete actions of playing include climbing or descending a mountain. Or, if it's 山を登ったり、降りたり、よく考えたりした, it means that you did many things including climbing and descending a mountain or thinking profoundly. "山を登ってって、降りてって、よく考えた。" is a ...


3

The verb in the nagara clause is always secondary to the main verb in the sentence. To take the example from the excellent book 'A Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar' by Seiichi Makino and Michio Tsutsui, If you were told chotto hanashi ga shitai n desu ga I'd like to have a little talk with you You could answer in two ways A) Ja, koohi o ...


3

The function of の is still more or less the same. It's connecting two nouns, but with a different relationship given by the preceding particle. 先生へのプレゼント - present to teacher 私達からのプレゼント - present from us 東京への道 - path to Tokyo Without の, you wouldn't be able to connect the nouns grammatically (at least without being wordy), and without the other ...


3

The most important point is that いちいち almost always has a negative connotation. This adverb describes something annoying/trivial/unnecessary is done all the time. For example, ひとつひとつ説明する (to explain one by one / step by step) is neutral, but いちいち説明する means "to bother to explain; to explain something while (I) don't want to do that". いつもありがとう (thanks always) ...



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