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29

「読むには読んだ」 means 'skimmed' a book. You quickly run through the book, but not intensively. "VるにはVだ" means "I did it (but not intensively / seriously), if I were forced to answer if I did it, or not." For example: 英語を習うには習った、でも上手く喋れない - I learned English, but I cannot speak English well. 聞くには聞いた、でも覚えていない - I heard it, but I cannot recall. 言うには言った、...


21

Just want to add to @永劫回帰's answer, which is a good one explaining the origin of the verb form 「あり」. Prose/Composition Grammar vs. Other Sets of Grammar: While a sentence like 「[保育園]{ほいくえん}がある。」 or 「保育園があります。」 is just perfect if used in prose or compositions. Those contain not a single sign of wordiness or unnaturalness in them. After all, each sentence ...


15

The old 終止形 of ある was あり. That means that you could end sentences with あり. Nowadays, あり is to be considered as the antonym of なし. 保育園あり -- There is a nursery 保育園なし -- There is no nursery


11

We have a word, 回文{かいぶん}, for instance 竹藪焼{たけやぶや}けた, meaning "The bamboo bush was burnt", as a counterpart to the English "palindrome". There are hundreds and hundreds of 回文, but I cannot recall them off the top of my head. I think you can collect them by googling 回文.


10

との combines the functions of the particles と and の. In your example, the first と is different from the second と. But in both cases, の is used to modify the following noun. Here, と means "with". 留学生数人と = with some exchange students 留学生数人との交流会 = a meeting/gathering with some exchange students The second と is the quoting particle. It indicates the contents ...


9

“あり” is a 終止形 of “ある,” the same as “なし” and “ない” as mentioned by 永劫回帰. It can be compared with an English pair word, “Yes (we have) and No (we don’t have)”. The 漢語 version of “あり・なし” are “有・無”, both of which are commonly used. Here are some examples: 雀斑【そばかす】あり – have freckles. 欠点【けってん】あり(の商品) – (a product) with a flaw 曰【いわく】あり – have something with a ...


8

「つき」is a suffix to a noun, meaning "attached, accompanied with, affected," for example: ひも付き - a string attached 条件付き - condition attached, conditional 期限付き - with a time-limit 賞味期限付き - with a pull-date stipulated [曰]{いわ}くつき(の品) - sth with an odd story behind it 昼食(弁当)付き - a lunch included (in a day-trip fare) 三食付きの宿 - an ...


8

Verb in potential form+ようになる means "come to be able to do verb". It indicates a gradual accomplishment. Your other sentence means that you want to play piano now. A cat mop is a brilliant idea. :)


8

ほうがいい Is used to say that out of a number of possibilities the stated one is preferable. お菓子を食べすぎないほうがいい It would be best if you didn't eat too many sweets. ことだ(です) Is used to say that something is important. (虫歯が嫌だったら)お菓子を食べすぎないことです。(If you don't like getting cavities then) not overdoing the sweets is a key. しないこと。 Is used to ...


8

To add to @Locksleyu's answer, 出す in "the continuative form of a verb (動詞の連用形) + 出す" can mean either: ㋐ そうすることによって外や表面に現れるようにする意を表す。「しぼり―・す」「見つけ―・す」 to make something reveal/appear outside or on the surface by doing the action, eg 「しぼり出す」(squeeze out) 「見つけ出す」(find out) or ㋑ その動作を始める意を表す。「降り―・す」「笑い―・す」 to start the action, eg 「降り出す」(start to ...


7

The target of 報復 is usually marked with に or へ. I also think this sentence should be 適当なぬいぐるみに報復したくなった, at least. And I don't get why 報復 is used here in the first place, because you can't have a grudge against a random (適当な) stuffed animal you didn't know. This kind of action is normally called 八つ当たり. EDIT: BCCWJ corpus has one example of ~を報復(する) and 15 ...


7

「Verb/Adjective + には + Same Verb/Adjective」 is a common (informal) way to emphasize the verb/adjective. 「[薦]{すす}められた[本]{ほん}を[読]{よ}むには読んだが、よく[理解]{りかい}できなかった。」 = "I did read the book that (someone recommended), but I was unable to understand it well." An example using an adjective: 「このピザはうまいにはうまいが、[激]{げき}ウマではない。」 "This pizza is indeed ...


7

I am not sure if in this case this is related to politeness as suggested in some comments (my feeling is that this sentence would be weird in general, regardless of the speakers social statuses/connections but maybe I'm wrong). I guess politeness could come in in a sentence like: 寒いので、窓を閉めて下さい。 The above is perfectly correct but it's usage might require ...


7

「ないな」わいは[い]{言}わないな。 [よる]{夜}は[しんさく]{新作}たくさんしはるよ。 [わたし]{私}[かいぶん]{回文}[ぜんぶ]{全部}[い]{活}かしたわ。 (Ah don' say "there ain't". They create many new works at night. I made good use of all (my) palindromes!") おそまつさまでした。 UPDATE: 回文であるはいくはどうですか? [ひと]{人}は[と]{問}ひ 「[とくい]{得意}?[はいく]{俳句}」と [ひと]{人}は[と]{問}ひ (They ask me / "Good at haiku?"—so / they ask me)


7

「Aに[限]{かぎ}らずB」 When this expression is used, it is generally implied that A is more significant than B. It uses "common sense" as the premise of the statement, which is something humans always do in speaking to others. To prove this, simply try swapping A for B in each of your sentences and see how the new sentences "feel" to you. 「[男性]{だんせい}に[限]{...


7

[初]{はじ}めてする means I do for the first time. しはじめる means I start to do. しはじめる implies that you are doing that now. So, sentence 1 is "I drank coffee for the first time" and 2 is "I started to drink coffee." In addition, 飲んではじめました is unnatural. 飲みはじめました is natural.


7

Among these, Sentences 1 and 4 are OK, but 2 and 3 are not. 忘れ物 is a noun meaning "something someone forgot to bring", "something left behind (e.g. in a train)". 忘れ物をする means "to forget to bring something", "to leave something behind (e.g., in a train)". Of course, it's a verb phrase. The te-form of する is して. しまう is a subsidiary verb which adds the nuance ...


7

(As l'électeur pointed out, the grammatical subject of 田中が好き is 田中 (here's why). But I'm assuming you're concerned about the person who likes 田中.) どうして田中が好きなんですか can mean "Why do you like Tanaka" (second person) or "Why does he/she like Tanaka" (third person), depending on the context. But it almost never means "Why do I like Tanaka?" (i.e., "I know I like ...


6

According to the definition of には 3 (多く「…には…が」の形で、動詞や形容詞を繰り返して)一応その動作や状態は認めるが、それに関連して起こる動作や状態については関知したり容認したりしない意を表す。「推薦状は、書くには書くが、あまり期待しないでくれ」「涼しいには涼しいが、ちょっと冷えすぎる」 It's saying that you recognize that a particular state or action but didn't acknowledge/accept the significance of what happened due to that state/action. So in this case: "Although I read ...


6

It modifies 好きになれなかった and adds an emphasis that the statement relates only to 好きに. To explain by example, 気持ち悪くはなかったけど、ちょっとしんどかった 美味しくはなかったけど、まずくもなかった In both cases は is used to signify that you didn't feel something, but did feel something else. The effect persists if you just say: 気持ち悪くはなかった the implication is that while you didn't feel nauseous, ...


6

The given quote, "主人は、料理にかけては、誰にも引けを取らないと信じている" is incomplete and confusing even to native Japanese speakers. It can be taken either way as you say; My husband believes he is a better cook than anyone else, or I believe my husband is a better cook than anyone else. But I guess the quoted sentense suggests that the speaker's husband believes himself ...


6

出る is not a normal motion verb. Xに出る means to participate in X. For example, カタン大会に出る would mean to participate in a Settlers of Catan tournament. を出る means to leave a place.  see Differences between 出るand 去る when expressing someone leaving Why does 出る accepts を although it is an intransitive verb?


6

I strongly recommend you reconsider before saying 彼女の一人 to your girlfriend, because [noun] の (word means one) means one of [noun], so you're saying "one of girlfriends". cf. 自転車の一台、手紙の一枚、動物の一種、空き缶の一個、部屋の一つ Conversely, 一人の彼女 is only a counter counting the noun, that means "one girlfriend". Your girlfriend might well be pleased with this one.


6

This まで corresponds to the following definition of まで of デジタル大辞泉: 3 動作・事柄がもうそれ以上には及ばず、それに限られる意を表す。…だけ。「気に入らなければ断る―さ」「念のために聞いてみた―だ」 So まで can mean only or just. ご参考までに is "just for your reference", implying that information is not critically important. Other examples: まずはご挨拶まで。 (Used at the end of a formal business letter, and means something ...


6

Adding particle に to the i-form (also called stem, masu-form, etc.) indicates a purpose for going somewhere. In your case, the purpose for going is to save the cat. So, as you guessed, "He went to save the kitten" is a good translation. Other simple examples of this grammar construct: 映画を見に行った I went to see a movie ゲームを買いに行く I'm going to buy ...


6

You can use どれ if you have more than two options. For example, A、B、Cのどれを選ぶか迷っています. If you have two options, you can use どちら as you said.


5

よれ (wrinkle) is a different verb to よれん. よれん is from よらない which is the negative of よる (寄る come near). おおっ くせえのう… おらあぶた小屋だけはマスクなしではそばにもよれんわい。 Oh, so smelly... Pig house is the only place I can't go near without a mask.


5

「Mini-Sentence + (だ) + なんて」 is a common and informal way of saying: "I never thought that ~~~~!" This structure is used to express one's sense of shock, surprise or suspicion about something. Please never use it in formal speech. I will say 'please' one more time. 「[私]{わたし}・・・こんなに[大切]{たいせつ}なものを[奪]{うば}ってしまっていただなんて・・!」 My own TL of that would ...


5

This has nothing to do with Kansai. 「フォークみたいの」 means 「フォークみたいなもの」= "fork-like thing". The 「の」 is not being used instead of 「を」. Rather, 「を」 is being omitted because of the informality of the speech. You can correctly say 「フォークみたいのを貸してください」 if you want to. You cannot omit the 「の」 because if you do, 「フォークみたい」 cannot be nominalized.


5

Literal translation of ”こともある” is "It happens / takes place sometimes / Whatever happens happens - as reffered to by Donald RRumsfeld," e.g., "週中に会社を休むこともある - I happen to take a dayoff sometimes in a weekday." In addition, you'd better to register the pattern, "....するなんて ...もんです(もんだ)" as a common set of phrase to mean a surprise and cynicism in your ...



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