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4

The first phrase is nominal. It is composed of 接頭語(prefix)「御」 and 名詞(noun)「来駕」. The numbers in the right side represent the reading order of 漢字. The second phrase is composed of a verb(動詞)「[成]{な}す」, a subsidiary verb(補助動詞)「[下]{くだ}さる」 and an auxiliary verb(助動詞)「たい」. The reading order of the second phrase is not simple top-to-down. This kind of reading ...


4

はやい is an adjective. You can't use it to modify a verb (おきる) like this. It only modifies nouns. early describes how the the waking up was done, therefore you need to use an adverb. To change an i-adjective into an adverb replace the final い with く, so your sentence becomes わたしは あまり はやく おきません。


3

This sentence has definitely no regrettable feeling. An example where a passive verb has a negative touch: 私は彼女にピザを食べられた。 Here are three objects involved: The victim (me), the performer (her/girlfriend) and the object (pizza). Assumed, we change the sentence a little: 私は彼女に食べられた。 Do you see how the meaning is changed completely? That's an indicator for ...


3

I think you're mixing up two different つとめる with different kanji. 努める is always intransitive. 務【つと】める (transitive; ~を務める): be in charge, play a role. Examples. 努【つと】める (intransitive; ~に努める): make an effort, endeavor. Examples. And there is also 勤める.


2

Yes, you can. Negative verb and adjective behave in the same manner conjugation-wise, so you can form it with adjective in analogy of ~なくたって. Your example is correct. Grammatically you can create ~たって from: verbs (positive), na-adjectives & copula: ta-form + って 食べたって, 行ったって, 死んだって, 勉強したって, きれいだったって, 子供だったって i-adjectives, negative ...


2

~のもとで means "under (control of) ~", of course, but I think this usage of もとで is not very natural. This sentence would have been perfectly fine without that (i.e., "未だLV1で燃え燻っている"). Or maybe the author wanted to express a feeling of "can't get rid of the LV1 group" by using that. Anyway, I recommend that you don't try to learn something new from this part. ...


2

It doesn't need to be progressive, つぶさなければ works as well. There's not really big difference between つぶしていなければ and つぶさなければ here. I think it's parallel to "had to be killing time" and "had to kill time".


2

The correct answer is #4 「いたら」, not #2 「いれば」. You would say: 運転していたら or 運転していると、急に車の前へ犬が飛び出してビックリした。 運転しているなら(#1)/いれば(#2) would be like "if I am/was driving", and 運転していても(#3) would be like "even if I was driving". 運転していたら(#4) can mean either "if I was driving" or "when I was driving" (Here it means the latter). I think いたら sounds a bit more casual ...


2

Your sentence 私{わたし}は水曜日{すいようび}にアルバイトがあります。 is absolutely correct sentence to say I have a part-time job on Wednesday. (or "I have to do a part-time job on Wednesday"). You can choose whether adding わたしは to the sentence or not. Both sentences make sense and natural sentences for me. 「水曜日{すいようび}にアルバイトがあります。」 is, if anything, preferable because ...


1

~を together with an motional intransitive verb means "through ~" as you correctly figured out. ~に before an motional verb defines the destination of the movement. These two uses can't be applied on 寝{ね}る (*) though, because sleeping obviously doesn't contain any motion. I prefer to think of the ~で particle as a "context marker". In which context are you ...


1

I think that ~た時 translates better as "when" or "while" than "after." 日本に行った時、写真をとります When I go to Japan, I (will) take pictures. 昼ご飯を食べた時、散歩する When I eat lunch, I (will) take a walk. A literal translation of 昼ご飯を食べた時 might be "At the time of eating lunch." A quick sentence search on jisho looks like they usually use "when" as well: jisho.org ...


1

Your interpretation of 向く and 向ける seems fairly good. While the meaning of these three verbs tend to overlap they are not exactely the same, thus 向く and 向かう are not two verbs for a single concept. Now, let's delve into some details. As you noticed, 向く and 向かう are intransitive and 向ける is transivitive. It is often considered that 向く and 向ける form an ...


1

Yes, you are using でも correctly in this sentence. And this sentence would be much better if you say "おさけも" instead of "おさけを". (も ≒ also)



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