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6

The former, かわいいのは私です is correct, and means "It is me who is cute." It's a cleft sentence made from a very simple sentence 私はかわいいです ("I am cute"). See this answer for details about cleft sentences. This の functions as a "placeholder", like it in "It is me who is cute." かわいい is a typical i-adjective, and it doesn't work as a no-adjective or a noun. かわいいの私です ...


5

I think in cases like [noun]+と言われてる the ”だ” before the と is optional, however to me including it sounds a little more natural and complete. However, saying ”〜大学ですと言われてる" would be pretty awkward in this type of context, regardless of whether you were speaking polite language (と言われています) or not. です could be used in a case where you want to emphasize someone ...


4

犬より猫が好き 犬よりも猫が好き 犬というより猫が好き 犬ではなく猫が好き These are all grammatical. Sentences 1 and 2 sound almost the same to me, but the latter may be slightly more emphatic. They mean "I like cats more than dogs." When the speaker likes both dogs and cats, but has to tell which he likes more, these are the natural choices. Sentence 4 means "I like cats, but not ...


4

Your sentences look pretty good overall, but: The first two sentences may be correct, but confusing to me. If you want to use A対B, it's better to clarify which number corresponds to which sex. Try something like these: クラスの《男女比{だんじょひ}¦性別の割合》は、男性対女性が2対3だ。 ...男性(が)2、対、女性(が)3だ。 ...男性(が)2に対して女性(が)3だ。 3分の2 (= 2/3 = 66.7%) is fairly common, but ...


4

This is the only shop in this town that sells socks. The most literal translation ("this" being the subject, and "only" modifying "shop" adjectivally) would be: これがこの町で靴下を売っている唯一【ゆいいつ】の店です。 これがこの町で靴下を売っているただひとつの店です。 これがこの町で靴下を売っているたったひとつの店です。 (emphatic, like "one and only one") Less commonly, 唯一の/etc can be in this position: ...


3

There are several ways to say it (using the same format you gave). To add to mikan's response, you can use 「しか」: この町で靴下を売っている店はこの店しかない。 It sounds a little much for a casual statement but for the sake of giving an example, you can use the term 「のみ」. E.g. この町で靴下を売っている店はこの店のみである。


3

You can say: この店はこの街で靴下を売っている唯一の店である。


3

There are two reasons. Unlike ~の間に, it seems that ~のうちに cannot be directly used with nouns that denote an event. (As long as it's used with the noun that denotes a time span, it can be very short) 今年のうちに/今日のうちに/7月のうちに/夏のうちに 朝のうちに/午前のうちに/日中のうちに 夏休みのうちに/オリンピックの開催期間のうちに 小学生のうちに/子供のうちに 一瞬のうちに [*]番組のうちに/[*]コンサートのうちに/[*]オリンピックのうちに Your ...


2

Relative clauses can be very long both in English and Japanese. In your second example, "採集自体よりも殺虫瓶のなかの青酸カリに魅せられて、どうしても足を洗うことが出来なくなった" modifies 者 as a relative clause. Most Japanese sentences end with a verb, but sentences that end with a noun are relatively common. It's a type of rhetoric device called 体言止め. See: what exactly is "体言止{たいげんど}め"? ...


2

I think you are overthinking the function of です. 「疲れますです」, 「疲れましたです」, and 「疲れますでした」are all ungrammatical entirely. You can't use です or でした after a verb, only after an adjective or noun. です is used to equate the subject/topic to a noun or adjective, but not a verb. Thus, you can use it to say something like "I am sad", but not "I am crying": ○ 私は悲しいです ...


2

To write さらわる with kanji: 攫わる (this is for the "kidnap" meaning of さらう) In Classical Japanese this was the verb さらふ which is conjugated with ハ行四段活用, like 言ふ. To make the passive form of さらふ you need to add the Classical Japanese 助動詞「る」 which attaches to the 未然形 (this is 「は」 for ハ行四段活用) Put さらふ into 未然形 ⇒「さらは」 Add 助動詞「る」⇒「さらはる」 Change the Kana to match ...


2

The most appropriate way to phrase the question will depend greatly on the situation. It will change with familiarity, social status, and the context of the conversation (i.e. is it a business meeting or are you asking a friend if they want you to give him a lift to a party). In general, ~ましょうか/~ようか , your No. 4, can be used without causing offence or ...


2

The following Wikipedia article on Japanese counter word explains well about how the counter words or counters (josūshi 助数詞) work in Japanese. In Japanese, as in Chinese and Korean, numerals cannot quantify nouns by themselves (except, in certain cases, for the numbers from one to ten; see below). For example, to express the idea "two dogs" in ...


2

I would say, 美人であったとしても魅力的だとは限らない。[醜]{みにく}いならなおさらである。 I don't think the word 「不美人」 is commonly used. For 'Ugly', '[醜]{みにく}い' or 'ブス' in an informal context would be more natural. My Japanese expression above sounds to conclude that 'An ugly person is not attractive.' If the conclusion you want to deliver is 'Being pretty is not enough to make ...


2

Think like this: All nouns in Japanese are uncountable. You can't count apples any more than you count water or light. Thus under Japanese grammar you always have to say "two 'objects' of apple", "four 'sticks' of banana" and "seven 'bodies' of dog", as if they are "two bottles of water" or "four rays of light" etc. りんご一つ/一個 an object of apple = an ...


2

定員{ていいん} as described on wikipedia means: 組織・団体などの場合、定員とは組織・団体に属しうる 最大数の人員 のことを指す。 or 施設・設備・自動車・鉄道車両・航空機等、ある区画の中に人を入れる場合には、定員とはある一定の基準の下にその区画内に入れる 最大人数 、またはその目安という意味がある。 The key point being the maximum number (note the 最大人数 and 最大数の人員 I emphasized). In other words, 定員になり次第 means As soon as the maximum number of people is reached. The reason you ...


1

Simply speaking, for this example, は emphasizes the topic of the sentence, に emphasizes the concept of location, and には emphasizes the location as the topic. Translating your three examples, which correspond to は, に, and には, we get: On the topic of my school (がっこう は), there is a Japanese teacher. At my school (がっこう に), there is a Japanese teacher. On the ...


1

Without using counters, in general, you can't make it sure if it's trying to express natural numbers or ordinal ones. りんごを 一つ ください is valid because 一つ is an adverb here. リンゴ一つを ください is also valid because リンゴ一つ is a compound noun this time.


1

First Question That part is usually translated as "When Shimamura gazed outside, thinking もうそんな寒さか, ...". See: verb+ようにと、 or verb+かと、 This pattern is super common. In this construction, I feel some verb (感じて, 思って, 願って, 言って, etc) is omitted after と. Second Question Simply, that だけ was used to mean there were only barracks in sight. Note that this だけ is ...


1

Adjectival clauses are clauses that modify a noun just as adjectives do. Adjectival clauses in Japanese precede the modified nouns. There are 2 kinds of adjectival clauses: Relative clauses Noun complement clauses Relative clauses The characteristic of relative clauses is the existence of gaps which are the modified nouns. The girl [whom I met ...


1

Yes, you are correct. I think this is quite common in Japanese to have a very long modifier like this. Although, your translation of 足をあらう is too literal, it's being used idiomatically to mean to clean up and stop doing bad things. Find the definition here.


1

In the same way as "襲わる" with "襲われる - be attacked", "奪わる" with "奪われる - be robbed of," "囚わる" with "囚われる- be captured," “さらわる” is a bit oldish way of saying “さらわれる,” which is a passive form of the verb, さらう, and you can put Kanji character, “攫う” to this. Kenkyusha's Japanese English Dictionary (英和中辞典:5th Edition) defines “攫う” as: 横合いから持ち去るーcarry away, sweep ...


1

As for the first question, you can simply explicitly indicate the subject in your second relative clause. 晩ご飯を食べなかったボブは、私が映画で見た銀行に行った。 Bangohan o tabenakatta bobu wa, watashi ga eiga de mita ginko ni itta. As for the second question, how a relative clause modifies the following noun depends on what is said or unsaid in the relative clause. Let's ...



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