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12

Cleft sentences In linguistics, there's something called a cleft sentence. The basic idea is that you split a sentence into two parts in order to focus something:  1a. I met her that day.         (original sentence)   1b. It was her that [I met that day].  (clefted sentence) In this example, we split the sentence into "I met __ that day" and "her". ...


9

だ is a conclusive copula, etymologically a contraction of で+ある. It is used sentence-finally (hence the name "conclusive"). The uncontracted form is still available in Modern Japanese, but it's somewhat different in distribution and more formal. だ isn't actually a verb―it cannot stand alone and doesn't inflect like a verb. で+ある isn't a verb either, but it ...


8

The other person is correct on this. We use 「けれども」 as a neutral connector rather frequently for simply connecting two (mini-)statements. I have no idea what bilingual dictionaries would say about this as I almost never use them myself, but a simple search in a monolingual dictionary will reveal the definition in question. For instance, see here (一 - ➂): ...


8

Both 「[映画]{えいが}で[見]{み}る」 and 「映画に見る」 are correct and natural phrases but they have different meanings. 「映画で見る」 is the simpler and more often used of the two. If you saw a certain thing, place, actor, etc. in a movie, you 映画で those things を見た. Those tangible objects just physically appeared in the movie and you saw them. 「映画に見る」 is less often used and ...


6

alexhatesmil's answer isn't wrong, but I just want to supplement regarding the も and what it's doing. So first, like the above の is a nominalizer. But that means you need something to connect の blocks to the rest of the sentence. You can do so with either は or も so you could say: 育ったのは京都です。 = The place I was raised is Kyoto. The も here replaces は ...


5

With this class of perception verbs, the thing you are perceiving is the direct object. We mark it as a direct object using the accusative case particle を: 映画【えいが】を見ました【みました】 Other verbs in this class include 聞く【きく】 'hear' and 嗅ぐ【かぐ】 'smell'. We would make it a direct object in English, too, by the way: I saw a movie. Except that in English, ...


4

の is being used as a nominalizer (something that turns a verb into a noun) in this case, with も meaning "as well as". So, literally, it would read something like "My being born as well as my growing up were in Kyoto." In other words, "I was born and raised in Kyoto."


4

As I mentioned before, those examples that I gave you, and that you're using for your question here, are from the Japanese grammar book Particles Plus by Atsuko Kawashima (Harcourt, Tokyo 1992). About your first alternative translation: The dog is barking, but someone is outside, right? In the original Japanese sentence 犬がほえている is merely a ...


4

"Does ところを always imply the meaning of のに in the meaning of "although"?" No, it does not. 「ところを」 has two different meanings/usages. Usage #1: 「だが」 or 「のに」 as you said. 「このシャツは、いつもは3,000[円]{えん}のところを、[今日]{きょう}は1,980円で[売]{う}っている。」 = "Although they usually sell this shirt for 3,000 yen, they are selling it for 1,980 yen today." ...


3

「[座]{すわ}っておいで。」 = "Go and sit there." You can say this when both you and the listener (a kid or someone close, not someone older or higher than yourself) know there is a place to sit down nearby and that place has already been talked about between the two parties. It is a casual/friendly imperative. = "Why don't you ~~." おいで here is short for おいでなさい. It ...


3

ちょうだい is another way of making a request. It can be replaced by (or replace) ください. E.g. 早く来てください 早く来てちょうだい 読んでください 読んでちょうだい The relevant entry from 大辞林 (J-J dictionary) is ⑤ 動詞の連用形に助詞「て」の付いた形や,動詞の未然形に「ないで」の付いた形に接続して,補助動詞の命令形のように用いて,親しみの気持ちをこめて相手に求める意を表す。…てください。 「この本を見せて-」 「ここにすわらないで-」 〔女性語や幼児語として用いられることが多い〕 emphasis mine (It also ...


2

They are different. AにXをみる means you find abstract things against something. For examples, その映画に人生の意味を見た (I found sense of the life in/out of the movie), その人にイエスを見た (I found Jesus in him/her) etc.


2

Combination of 連用形 and おいで can have various meanings, depending on the context: [連用形 + ておいで] Casual and mild version of 「連用形 + ていろ」 (stay/keep [verb-ing]) 温かい飲み物を作るから、ちょっとそこで座っておいで。 ← 座っていろ。 これからお父さんがすることを、よく見ておいで。 ← 見ていろ。 今からここで大事な話をするけれども、お前は黙っておいで。 ← 黙っていろ。 [連用形 + ておいで] Casual and mild version of 「連用形 + に行け」 (go and [verb], leave here ...


2

You can check a Japanese dictionary. They are called 連語 (phrase or idiom) when they are used in these forms: Aとはいえ、B。 Aというものの、B。 “とはいえ” = 助詞 “と” + 助詞 “は” + 已然形 of 動詞 “言う” “というものの” = 助詞 “と” + 連用形 of 動詞 “言う” + 名詞 “もの” + 助詞 “の” They are called 接続詞 (conjunction) when they are used in these forms: A。とはいえ、B。 B。というものの、B。


2

見に来てくださった方、 チームAのことも、私のことも、 好きになってもらえたかなー? Lit. "I wonder if those of you who kindly came to watch ended up enjoying both Team A and myself...?" "Thanks everyone for attending! Did you enjoy Team A's and my performances?" 「チームAのこと」 and 「私のこと」 are the "〜が-marked objects" of 「好きになる」. 「見に来てくださった方」 is the "subject" of 「好きになる」, that is, the people ...


1

"if one does not 'verb'" can be expressed as : verb + ない form + ば form = verb + なければ It is similar to the ば form conditional for い adjectives: 高い(い adj) + ば form = 高ければ In your particular example : 異ならなければ


1

“私の父、B” is common in modern Japanese. “Bという私の父” sounds as if you have several fathers and one is named B.


1

You can use “のとおりに” after any noun phrase. However, it may sound slightly awkward when used after a short noun. This form can be analyzed as: “Nのとおりに" = 名詞 “N” + 助詞 “の” + 名詞 “とおり” + 助詞 “に” “どおりに” is used like a postposition. Usually it is used after a short noun. Analysis: “Nどおりに” = 名詞 “N” + 名詞 “どおり” + 助詞 “に”


1

Its like "come sit here", like the way you would tell a child or someone lower than you (or a peer if you're just speaking "cute" by using diminutives).



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