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9

It is common in songs, and it is not specific to children’s songs. In the first case, the pitch of the lyric line is probably something like: し(G) ら(G) ん(G) ぷ(G) り(G) を(F#) し(G) た(E) っ(F#) て(D) but if you try to sing this as it is, there is a problem: gemination is not a sound but just a pause, and you cannot sing it with any pitch. Therefore, the ...


5

Your example case is a little strange and without more context, I am not sure about the intent. In general cases, just like Amanda said: it indicates a word being cut-off (or sometimes a very strong exclamation). An interesting aspect is that it seems to work a little different from the equivalent in Western languages, in that it does not actually cut-off ...


4

My first impression is that the only purpose of the extra mora is to create an additional mora for rhythmic reasons. Vowel lengthening does occur for expressive reasons, but I don't think any connection can be drawn to gemination. From a phonological perspective, I see no reason a vowel would lengthen before a geminate. I don't recall ever seeing such a ...


3

Not hugely confident in this answer, but I'll try. The gemination is supposed to be accomplished by a glottal stop in speech, and singing with a glottal stop is awkward at best and would sound strange even done properly. I imagine that the vowel lengthening is done to fill in a mora for rhythm/time purposes, and to indicate the omission. (That is, I know ...



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