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6

General As had been pointed out, as a general rule, that part of the word - in terms of kana syllables - that changes or inflects is written with okurigana. See also 「送り仮名の付け方『国語を書き表すための送り仮名の付け方のよりどころ」』・単独の語1・活用のある語・通則1」, which states as a general principle that the inflectional ending is added in kana. 活用のある語(通則2を適用する語を除く。)は,活用語尾を送る。 History When ...


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You can think of Furigana and Okurigana as the root and stem of the word respectively. Do you know what transitive/intransitive verbs are? Unlike English, nearly all verb meanings have a pair of these. In case you don't (or some future reader doesn't), transitive verbs can (sometimes must) take a direct object (using を). They are actions you do to ...


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Newspapers do not 100% stick to the 常用漢字 kanji. They have their own style guidelines for kanji use, and there is such a thing as the "新聞常用漢字表". This includes: Kanji not in the joyo treated as joyo: 磯(いそ) 絆(きずな) 哨(ショウ) 疹(シン) 胚(ハイ) Kanji in the joyo treated as non-joyo: 虞 且 遵 但 朕 附 又 Additional non-joyo readings treated as joyo: 証(あか-す) 鶏(とり) ...


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Newspapers give furigana for two reasons: Because the word contains non-常用漢字, or non-常用 readings of kanji. (This is a PC matter for public media. Novels never do it.) Because the kanji is rarely used, or the word should be read in local, irregular, nonce or other unexpected way to readers, or potentially ambiguous in pronunciation. (This is the traditional ...



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