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21

The dots, called [傍点]{ぼうてん}, function like italics or underline with the Latin alphabet. They are for emphasis. To see the effect in rōmaji: futatabi kanojo jishin no kuchi kara kiku koto ni naru to wa


16

Writing the lyrics this way allows the artist to convey an extra bit of the ulterior meaning. To use the first example, where 希望 is sung as ゆめ, we can assume that ゆめ was chosen because it fit well with the surrounding syllables. But ゆめ by itself isn't specific: it could be an abstract dream of what one wants to do or accomplish, or it could be the sort of ...


13

Japanese often refer to planets as ほし as well when they're being informal, the manga is just specifying that it's a planet and not actually a star. I guess you could say it's a stylistic choice.


9

The number kanji are included on the list of first grade kanji that all Japanese children, theoretically, should know by they are in the second grade of elementary school. The other kanji you list (except for 日, but they may not cover that reading) are at higher reading levels. It's likely that they made an editorial decision that, well, pretty much any ...


8

Your statement わけ is not a reading for 理由. 理由 is only read りゆう is too strong. りゆう is the most natural reading, but it can also be read as わけ. Although, it is true that, as with your example 妻 with ワイフ, furigana sometimes departs from its established reading under expectation of some rhetorical effects. why わけ for 理由? Because りゆう and わけ both mean ...


8

ほし means any heavenly body except the sun and the moon. And while ほし is most often heard used with stars, it is also used for "planet". This could just be related to lyrics in that both kanji mean planet, but decided to go with these kanji and this pronounciation for a poetic effect.


8

This tends to be a style choice by an author, who uses a kanji for aesthetic/readability purposes for a word which is usually expressed with 外来語 (borrowed words from foreign languages). The author can choose to do this for a few reasons. Often if they are concerned that the 外来語 they're using will not be understood by everyone, they use kanji to express the ...


7

This is similar with bdonlan's answer, but in my understanding, On first grade, they learned both 三, and 日 kanjis, but only pronounced 日 as "ひ" in "Sun", but not as "か", and also there is some probability that no 日付 related terms learn on first grade like ついたち「一日」、ふつか「二日」、みっか「三日」, ... yet. So, may be that's the reason why they only put ふりがな on 日, but not ...


6

If you're taking care to write the readings over the characters they belong to (which people don't always do), then geminated consonants belong to the first kanji: 学{がく} + 校{こう} gaku + kō  =  学{がっ}校{こう} gakkō As you can see, the consonant still belongs to the first kanji. Gak is a reduced form of gaku, having lost its final vowel u. Likewise, in your ...


6

To answer the question in the title, the furigana in Aozora files are the furigana that were actually used in the printed original. So they are accurate in the sense that they represent actual usage. However, because most of the books there are very old (the majority being prewar), that usage often does not reflect what the Ministry of Education deems ...


6

You say you're just going on vacation in Japan. Well, in that case, you might not need to know a whole lot of kanji. In fact, people go to Japan without knowing the language at all and manage to get around okay! So for your purposes, you might be fine without learning any kanji at all. But what if you're trying to learn the language for real? The fact ...


6

I can't answer on the particular case of a word that would receive furigana after not receiving it earlier (the opposite, however, is naturally quite common): assuming the words are rigorously identical and identically read both times, this sounds more like an oversight than anything. As for the general rules of adding furigana, they are pretty ...


6

Basic furigana means, for 絶対{ぜったい}, 'zettai' is how you read 絶対...period. For the non-standard cases, think of it basically the same way, but with a little twist: for 巨{おお}きく, 'oo' is how I want you to read 巨. As a deeper example... 泥棒{おまえ}は信用{しんよう}出来{でき}ない。 If this is a line of dialogue, the person is saying "I can't trust you", but the implication ...


5

Songs are poetry; poets work hard to get exactly the feeling they want from the reader/hearer. Since kanji have semantic values to them, with readings that fluctuate anyway, this happens pretty often. I guess here it gives the feeling of a dream which is a hope, not just a vision seen while sleeping. You'll find videogame/anime/manga stuff that has an ...


5

It's quite common on Japanese Songs, because they want to express the meaning more precisely at lyrics. 未来 - future (which mean - will forever ...) あす - tomorrow (using "future" when singing will be overact or over.. something, so they pronounce it as あす) also same for 希望 (hope, for long ), ゆめ (a dream - a short timed)


4

I think one of the reason would be politeness, for example あの人知っている? is more polite than あの女 or あの男 in the sense. And the latter has some sarcastic or contemptness. Using 人 with おとこ or おんな can be seen on manga or may be on some lyrics. My understanding of the difference between actual words and furigana is that furigana sometimes refer to colloqial form, ...


4

I have never seen 人 with おとこ or おんな for the furigana, but I've seen plenty of examples when the person would be saying the furigana, but the meaning was further clarified by the kanji used. For example, in Deadman Wonderland, it quite often has the letters DW with the furigana ここ because the person said 'here' but was referring to the entire park.


4

Generally (barring situations like this) all furigana are written as hiragana, regardless of whether it's the onyomi or kunyomi of the character. You could think about it this way: there's nothing grammatically wrong with writing a word like にち in hiragana rather than kanji. ニチ, on the other hand, would be ungrammatical (or at least non-standard). When ...


4

You will often find this in songs as well as many Japanese manga's. If you watched ef (the anime), you will see this technique used exclusively. It is done for artistic purposes just like you said. It is also to give reader a deeper meaning behind the word that it is used on. In your case the sentence is meant to be pronounced 君がゆめに変わってゆく but the presence ...


4

This shows up even in regular writing (i.e. not lyrics to a song). There's no cultural reason for it, it's more just a way for the writer to express two different things at the same time. The author might have a string of kanji written out but the furigana might end up being some foreign word in katakana or even in the Latin alphabet. For example, I've seen ...


4

I'm just addressing #1, since snailboat covered the other ones very well. Is a furigana only allowed to be attached to a single kanji character? No. In fact, it's common to attach furigana to a kanji compound, as seen in Matcha (やさしい日本語 version) NHK Web Easy City of Tsukuba's site (やさしい日本語 version) There are also some that attach furigana to single ...


4

In Japanese schools, we were taught that 「わたくし」 was the only correct kun-reading for 「私」. Read it another way, you got marked off. Originally, this was all I was going to say in my answer. However, I did a quick research and found that it changed in 2010. Now, both わたくし and わたし are correct kun-readings. ...


3

ルビ is originally a technical term of the publishing industries. The ruby feature is called ルビ in Adobe InDesign, MS Word, etc. A ruby can be in kana, kanji or even alphabets, but 傍点(圏点) is different from ruby. I suppose the word ルビ focuses more on the technical aspect of this feature. And the word ふりがな focuses on the role of ルビ. It implies "how to read this ...


3

It's just an explanation of the word added like that. "暗器" (anki) is not a common word in Japanese. For example there is no entry in WWWJDIC or in goo dictionary for this word. But most people would guess the reading is probably あんき. So this "furigana" is used to explain here, as you imagined.


2

First of all, are the meanings correct? Yes, you are right. Then, after a quick search, I found out that okurigana is efficient to disambiguate them. Didn't the author mean furigana instead? Yes, he's wrong. Lastly, what are the most important (to know)/most frequent homographic Kanji out there? Err, all the X中, where 中 is read ちゅう or じゅう. ...


2

They are called 当{あ}て字{じ}. There are two types of 当て字: Ignoring the meaning of the Kanji and using them to create a sound (e.g. 珈{コー}琲{ヒー}) Ignoring the reading of the Kanji and using their meaning to demonstrate another sound (e.g. 衝{ショッ}撃{ク}) In this case, they are using the second type. The voices of the ghosts sound evoke 共鳴, so while you read 声, ...


1

It is called ルビ but many of us native speakers just substitute ふりがな for it.


1

That is a proper reading. 「私」 can be read as 「わたし」, 「わたくし」, or one of several archaic ways given the context.


1

As you can see from the high number of answers this is part of the fun of learning Japanese. I'd like to add pride and belonging to the list of reasons. Every kanji has several sounds, every sound has many kanji. Most of the official kanji are simplifications or replacements of older forms. After a few years in Japan, even I felt the kanji used on the labels ...



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