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1

I think there's a lot of variation between speakers. Even as a foreigner at a university, I have met various types of speakers: never use teineigo at all, even though I'm clearly older people who use keigo for a few minutes and switch when I reply in casual form (most common) people who use keigo for weeks, and say it's uncomfortable to use casual form ...


3

In my experience, the nature of the relationship and the nature of the communication are both important for knowing when/how to use the plain form and to knowing what the use of plain form signals. In written workplace communication, I never see plain form (I work at a university). In written personal communications (things like Facebook or IM), I rarely ...


3

Don't use さん in a formal email. I think "事務局の加島" means she is probably a clerical staff rather than a teacher. (Of course it's a good idea to check it using Google search) So the safe choice would be to address her as 加島様.


1

Whenever it feels right. This is probably not the answer you were looking for, so here are my observations: If it's anything work related, or official, you stick to the polite language, no matter how well you know the person you are talking to. As soon as you are doing something else in your private life, let's say having a beer together, it's okay to use ...


2

In my personal experience, the transition from polite to plain form is done spontaneously, specifically if you are of the same age level or same position (at work). A month or two after your introduction, you may switch to plain form if there are no inhibitions from your part of any kind, or you have done a milestone together (project closure, etc) . ...



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