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24

While sawa's answer does cover the basic construction rules, it's definitely worth it to go over the different use cases of わけ. Grab a comfy chair and your favorite beverage, because this is a long one. The best and most complete analysis I've found of this use of わけ is in this 2001 paper by Atsuko Yokota: 文末【ぶんまつ】表現【ひょうげん】「わけだ」の用法【ようほう】 : ...


20

I've let my subconscious sleep on this for a while, which has a native Japanese language processor built in, and come to the conclusion that のこと does two seemingly opposite things. I'll illustrate them with my inner images for [noun] and [noun]のこと, and later quote a dictionary to further support my views. Let's take 事件のこと as an example. A plain "事件" is a ...


16

So I talked to my co-workers here, and 4 of us (Japanese native) discussed this for a good 30 minutes! lol Our conclusion is that the difference is very subtle and each of us had a slightly different explanation. The most common ground was that こと somewhat "directs" more attention (or maybe "creates more focus") on the subject. We also found some ...


15

This is from an excerpt about when to use kana instead of kanji. Since I can't really translate it well, I'll leave a lot out, so check out the publisher's page. Also, I don't have much exposure but still a couple seem strange to me, like わたし and 素敵. Even the book uses 私 in its preface. Words that should be written with hiragana There is the question of ...


11

The translation 'intention' is not that bad, but maybe, 'have in mind' will work more generally. 夏休みにはゆっくり休むつもりです。 I have in mind to take a full rest during the summer vacation. In 分かっているつもりだ, つもり is one way of making your statement accurate, and in many cases polite. In linguistic terms, this is called a hedge. In this particular case, everyone ...


11

It's hard to answer this specific question without getting into the more general topic of the ~のだ construction, which, as jkerian mentioned, can mark an explanation for a certain context, which may be either explicit or implicit. Put succinctly, ~のだ provides supporting information. This information is often a reason, but it may be a cause, basis, conclusion, ...


11

I'd translate them as follows: 分かるわけがないでしょう。 Wakaru wake ga nai deshō. "There's no way (he) can understand this." or "(He) surely doesn't understand this." 分かるはずがないでしょう。 Wakaru hazu ga nai deshō. "I don't think (he) understands this." はず is more of a personal inkling, while わけ is more of an objective/direct/strong statement. Depending on how ...


11

My explanation is (along the lines of Dave's explanation) that のこと will add the meaning 'things about', and that will include some propositions/concerns. With 考える 'think', the difference is salient. As Tsuyoshi Ito points out, 地球を考えて行動する is ungrammatical to me. I feel that the object of the verb 考える has to be something like proposition, question, ...


9

Perhaps your teachers told you ~のだから (~んだから) is incorrect not because it is never used (you already know it's very common) but because you can't simply drop it into any sentence. While digging around on Google, I came across a very nice PDF published by the Japan Foundation which explains the use of ~のだから. You can read it on your own (it's even got ...


9

より, when preceding an adjective as in your examples, means "more" or "-er": より多くの more [numerous] より快適な more pleasant, smoother より長い longer より良い better より一般的な more common, more typical As such, でより and でのより should not be considered together. で and での go with the preceding word, and より goes with the succeeding word.


9

わけ is a noun meaning 'reason', but it might be better translated as 'circumstances' as Matt comments. When you put it at the end of a sentence, you are turning that sentence into an appositive clause modifying that noun. When the predicate is an adjectival noun (also called na-adjective), you need to change the ending into the adnominal ending (-な). The ...


9

~のですが (or ~のですけれども, or ~んだけど, or any of a number of variants) is often used in this way to "set the stage" and provide a context for a succeeding clause or sentence. Here, the purpose of ~のですが is to mark information that will help the listener understand the second half of the sentence. As such, the が here is best translated into English as "and", not "but". ...


9

According to Haomi Hanaoka McGloin んです・のです functions to mark information as known in the context of the discourse. のです allows the speaker to present information as if it were shared information. Depending on the context and type of sentence, the specific meaning varies however. There seem to be at least five different ways it can be used. In this instance I ...


7

なんだ is a pattern that is sometimes called the "extended predicate". The exact best way to express this in English is subject to debate. Usually the usage follows a pattern of explanation of some question that either has been asked explicitly or could be asked implicitly. For example, if A-san is telling B-san that s/he wants to go with B-san to Tokyo, ...


7

disclaimer: not a native speaker I think 'wake' implies that things happened as expected, where as 'hazu' implies that what happened is not what was expected. Or, 'wake' is a bit more neutral, a "matter of fact", where as 'hazu' is more of a personal opinion/subjective kind of thing. This is how I would understand the difference: それは分かるわけがないでしょう。 sore ...


7

It is a contracted form of ここの所. 所 typically means place, but has other uses such as heading a relative clause or, as in this case, refering to a time instead of a place. ここ is also referring to recent times rather than nearby places. The translation is 'these days', 'recently'. You are right that the dictionary you cited is wrong. It is misinterpreting 所. ...


7

These are called formal noun (形式名詞). Officially, they should be written in hiragana. PDFs of 公用文における漢字使用等について(平成22年内閣訓令第1号) can be found here or here. A more general guideline is that closed class words or morphemes (particles, inflectional endings, formal nouns, adverbial affixes, etc.) should be written in hiragana.


7

It actually has two meanings. When it is put after the predicate like your original example, it means "just now", and it conflicts with 最近 "recent". That is why your sentence was corrected. # 正直に言うと、最近アメリカのドラマを観ていたばかり。 (Meaningly odd) 'Being honest, I have just now been watching American dramas recently.' If you put it within the predicate phrase ...


6

Unless someone comes up with a stunning counter proposal, I am firmly in the camp that says こと refers to "all the things about [you or whatever subject]." In my personal interactions, I can viscerally feel a difference between saying 「あなたが好き」 and 「あなたのことが好き」. It's a similar distinction as in English between "I love you," and, "I'm in love with you." In ...


6

When ことはない is used to mean “there is no need,” I think that the nuance is that it is not only unnecessary but also should be avoided. 必要はない on its face value just states that it is unnecessary. (I wrote “on its face value” because if someone chooses to say that something is unnecessary, it is often because he/she actually thinks that something should not ...


6

First of all, as you already implicitly show in your examples, their modifiers are not interchangable.  {こ/そ/あ/ど}んなふうに × {こ/そ/あ/ど}のふうに △ {こ/そ/あ/ど}んなように  {こ/そ/あ/ど}のように I think ふう means some manner freely picked out, whereas よう is a manner chosen from the possibilities set by the context. This difference parallels the English what vs. which. In ...


6

I think both conveys the same meaning. ことなく is though a bit more formal. For example, you'd be a bit surprised if a 10 year old would say ことなく, whereas ないで would be very common. However, ことなく can be used in colloquial usage, especially if you are using 敬語. Even when you are talking in non 敬語, you can still use it. To summarize, ことなく is a tiny bit more ...


6

かのよう(だ) translates as ‘(seems) as if...’ or ‘(seems) as if perhaps...’ while (depending on the sentence) ようだ can be less conjectural. …なにもなかったかのように… ‘as if nothing had happened’[1] …なにもなかったように… ‘it looked like nothing had happened’ However, in counter-factual statements, ようだ can lend this meaning all by itself. Often (as in the sentence of the ...


5

Derek already answered the question well, but let me add an important difference between English and Japanese about comparisons. While “より X” means “more X,” simple “X” can also mean “more X.” In other words, unlike English, the comparative degree does not have to be made explicit in Japanese. The adverb より clarifies or emphasizes that it is about a ...


5

Yes, you can say 〜んじゃない. The ん/の performs its usual function indicating that you are explaining some fact (see my answer to this previous question). 〜じゃない here turns the sentence into a tag question (see Derek's answer to your previous question). A: (I've already gotten five great answers to questions I asked on the Japanese.SE site!) B: ええ、便利なんじゃない? ...


5

の/ん often indicate that the speaker is attempting to explain or account for some fact. This can connect the question to a previous statement made by the addressee. For example: A: (Wow, some of the people who participated in the tournament were really good!) B: 誰が参加したんですか。 Here B would like to know which people inspired A to make that statement. ...


5

On はず and わけ, answers in the original question explain it better than I would so I'll leave it to them. But on しょうがない, it's totally different from the other two. しょうがない is used when you don't have other choice but to do it. It can also mean "there's nothing else you can do" p/s: thanks for expanding my question


5

~たところ and ~たばかり both mean "just did X". I was always taught that ~たところ means "I just did X and haven't done anything else, whereas ~たばかり means "I just did X (but could've been a little while ago)." The "scope" of the event can determine the recentness. 例 昼食を食べたところだ。 → I just ate lunch (right now). (午後3:00) 昼食食べたばかりなんで、眠たい。 → (At 3:00pm) I just ...


5

sawa's answer explains the の, but I feel のか as used in the question hasn't been fully explained. It doesn't correspond well in this situation to "is it the case that...?", because that is a question that demands an answer. This particular use of のか doesn't. I doubt it would be said with a questioning tone. "So you have that/those kind(s) of ...


5

You are on the right track. の is a formal noun with a general meaning such as the case, the fact, or the situation. The sequence ...な is an appositive clause modifying the formal noun の. 彼は学生だ 'He is a student.' [彼は学生な]のだ 'It is the case [that he is a student].' The appositive clause 彼は学生な 'that he is a student' modifies the formal noun の 'the ...



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