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26

While sawa's answer does cover the basic construction rules, it's definitely worth it to go over the different use cases of わけ. Grab a comfy chair and your favorite beverage, because this is a long one. The best and most complete analysis I've found of this use of わけ is in this 2001 paper by Atsuko Yokota: 文末【ぶんまつ】表現【ひょうげん】「わけだ」の用法【ようほう】 : ...


25

I've let my subconscious sleep on this for a while, which has a native Japanese language processor built in, and come to the conclusion that のこと does two seemingly opposite things. I'll illustrate them with my inner images for [noun] and [noun]のこと, and later quote a dictionary to further support my views. Let's take 事件のこと as an example. A plain "事件" is a ...


18

This is from an excerpt about when to use kana instead of kanji. Since I can't really translate it well, I'll leave a lot out, so check out the publisher's page. Also, I don't have much exposure but still a couple seem strange to me, like わたし and 素敵. Even the book uses 私 in its preface. Words that should be written with hiragana There is the question of ...


17

So I talked to my co-workers here, and 4 of us (Japanese native) discussed this for a good 30 minutes! lol Our conclusion is that the difference is very subtle and each of us had a slightly different explanation. The most common ground was that こと somewhat "directs" more attention (or maybe "creates more focus") on the subject. We also found some ...


13

It's hard to answer this specific question without getting into the more general topic of the ~のだ construction, which, as jkerian mentioned, can mark an explanation for a certain context, which may be either explicit or implicit. Put succinctly, ~のだ provides supporting information. This information is often a reason, but it may be a cause, basis, conclusion, ...


11

According to Haomi Hanaoka McGloin んです・のです functions to mark information as known in the context of the discourse. のです allows the speaker to present information as if it were shared information. Depending on the context and type of sentence, the specific meaning varies however. There seem to be at least five different ways it can be used. In this instance I ...


11

I'd translate them as follows: 分かるわけがないでしょう。 Wakaru wake ga nai deshō. "There's no way (he) can understand this." or "(He) surely doesn't understand this." 分かるはずがないでしょう。 Wakaru hazu ga nai deshō. "I don't think (he) understands this." はず is more of a personal inkling, while わけ is more of an objective/direct/strong statement. Depending on how ...


10

Perhaps your teachers told you ~のだから (~んだから) is incorrect not because it is never used (you already know it's very common) but because you can't simply drop it into any sentence. While digging around on Google, I came across a very nice PDF published by the Japan Foundation which explains the use of ~のだから. You can read it on your own (it's even got ...


10

より, when preceding an adjective as in your examples, means "more" or "-er": より多くの more [numerous] より快適な more pleasant, smoother より長い longer より良い better より一般的な more common, more typical As such, でより and でのより should not be considered together. で and での go with the preceding word, and より goes with the succeeding word.


8

~のですが (or ~のですけれども, or ~んだけど, or any of a number of variants) is often used in this way to "set the stage" and provide a context for a succeeding clause or sentence. Here, the purpose of ~のですが is to mark information that will help the listener understand the second half of the sentence. As such, the が here is best translated into English as "and", not "but". ...


7

disclaimer: not a native speaker I think 'wake' implies that things happened as expected, where as 'hazu' implies that what happened is not what was expected. Or, 'wake' is a bit more neutral, a "matter of fact", where as 'hazu' is more of a personal opinion/subjective kind of thing. This is how I would understand the difference: それは分かるわけがないでしょう。 sore ...


7

Unless someone comes up with a stunning counter proposal, I am firmly in the camp that says こと refers to "all the things about [you or whatever subject]." In my personal interactions, I can viscerally feel a difference between saying 「あなたが好き」 and 「あなたのことが好き」. It's a similar distinction as in English between "I love you," and, "I'm in love with you." In ...


6

I think both conveys the same meaning. ことなく is though a bit more formal. For example, you'd be a bit surprised if a 10 year old would say ことなく, whereas ないで would be very common. However, ことなく can be used in colloquial usage, especially if you are using 敬語. Even when you are talking in non 敬語, you can still use it. To summarize, ことなく is a tiny bit more ...


6

When ことはない is used to mean “there is no need,” I think that the nuance is that it is not only unnecessary but also should be avoided. 必要はない on its face value just states that it is unnecessary. (I wrote “on its face value” because if someone chooses to say that something is unnecessary, it is often because he/she actually thinks that something should not ...


6

In this sentence, you could remove ような without changing the meaning much. The ような adds a slight nuance of "or the like", i.e. We don't have time for stopping or the like. A very similar effect could be achieved by saying ここで立ち止まる時間などない I don't have the context here, but I would say that in this case it's probably used mainly for emphasis.


6

かのよう(だ) translates as ‘(seems) as if...’ or ‘(seems) as if perhaps...’ while (depending on the sentence) ようだ can be less conjectural. …なにもなかったかのように… ‘as if nothing had happened’[1] …なにもなかったように… ‘it looked like nothing had happened’ However, in counter-factual statements, ようだ can lend this meaning all by itself. Often (as in the sentence of the ...


6

なんだ is a pattern that is sometimes called the "extended predicate". The exact best way to express this in English is subject to debate. Usually the usage follows a pattern of explanation of some question that either has been asked explicitly or could be asked implicitly. For example, if A-san is telling B-san that s/he wants to go with B-san to Tokyo, ...


5

Wake is a reason or cause; hazu is an expectation. They can be used in the same context, but still have a different sense. 分かるわけない! "How would you understand?!" (there's no reason to think you would get this) わかるはずはない "He shouldn't understand" (I expect that he doesn't).


5

の/ん often indicate that the speaker is attempting to explain or account for some fact. This can connect the question to a previous statement made by the addressee. For example: A: (Wow, some of the people who participated in the tournament were really good!) B: 誰が参加したんですか。 Here B would like to know which people inspired A to make that statement. ...


5

On はず and わけ, answers in the original question explain it better than I would so I'll leave it to them. But on しょうがない, it's totally different from the other two. しょうがない is used when you don't have other choice but to do it. It can also mean "there's nothing else you can do" p/s: thanks for expanding my question


5

They mean the same thing, but my book says that ことなく shouldn't be used for "everyday/habitual actions". Ex. × うっかりして、切手をはることなくポストに入れてしまった。 ○ うっかりして、切手をはらないでポストに入れてしまった。


5

事件を覚えている。 → 事件のことを覚えている。 地球を考えて行動する → 地球のことを考えて行動する What I feel by reading those two is the difference in span, intention, causes or effects. Adding "のこと" extends the proposition's target to contain also things that are related. I think it is similar in concept to what we have with について/に関して where に関して also considers related, often unmentioned, ...


5

~たところ and ~たばかり both mean "just did X". I was always taught that ~たところ means "I just did X and haven't done anything else, whereas ~たばかり means "I just did X (but could've been a little while ago)." The "scope" of the event can determine the recentness. 例 昼食を食べたところだ。 → I just ate lunch (right now). (午後3:00) 昼食食べたばかりなんで、眠たい。 → (At 3:00pm) I just ...



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