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2

“Supposedly” can be translated in various ways depending on the context, for example: 多分, 恐らく, 想像するに, and 推測するところ. Oxford Advanced English Learners Dictionary defines "reliquary" as: a container in which a relic of a holy person is kept. Kenkyusha's Readers Plus English Japanese Dictionary defines "Reliquary" as 聖骨箱. If we follow both of the ...


2

You haven't given any concrete context, but ご馳走様でした gochisōsama deshita is a very common phrase conveying that it was a very good meal. You can/should use this phrase if you are talking to the chef (or you can say it loudly if you pass by the kitchen on the way to the counter where you pay after your meal). However, telling it to the waiting staff, the ...


0

You are right. Using two nouns or phrases are expected when you refer to any relationship as follows. [鶏]{にわとり}と[卵]{たまご}の[関係]{かんけい} The relationship between chicken and egg. AとBの関係 or AとBは関係がある are broadly used. However, it doesn't necessarily mean you have to always use two nouns as either of them could be omitted or implied. It is quite common to ...


4

I think the sentence is about to explain how "IT" is correlated with 占い好き. And "IT" must be something in the previous sentences or paragraph. It is common to omit pronoun in some cases. The full sentence may be: なぜこれが占い好きと関係があるというと、、、


1

I like naruto's reply, but I'd be curious of your intent since your format seems a bit odd. In addition you may want to consider the below as a reference. It doesn't quite fit your mold but it feels more natural. この辺でラーメンを食べられるお店(レストラン)はありますか。 or この辺でラーメンを食べられるお店(レストラン)はありません。


4

Among the four options you listed, ラーメンを出していない/出さない sounds the most natural to me. You can also say 「この辺の店はラーメンをやって(い)ない」 , which would sound equally natural and even more casual. ラーメンを扱う and ラーメンを取り扱う sounds too formal and stiff for everyday conversations. ~を売る店 is okay for ordinary shops, but not for restaurants. I think ハンバーグを売る店/寿司を売る店/etc will almost ...


2

The 1988 Shunjusha edition of Dogen (ed. Kagamishima Genryu 鏡島元隆) gives this reading: 這箇はこれ誰そ誰かこれ我 kore wa kore ta so, tare ka kore ware "Who is this? Who am I?" (or more provocatively "... is me?") Points that might interest you: 這箇 can be pronounced "shako" but in most of the kanbun I've seen it's just assigned the reading "kore" When 是 is ...


2

逃げ切り世代 refers to that last generation that gets out just a bit more than they put in to their social security pension (people born about 1964 according to the article below). Any younger and they would start getting out less than they put in. Source: allabout.co.jp article here 矛先すら見えない literally means, "(they) can't even see the tip of the spear". The "...


1

I take your quote. ”メーラーの設定によってクリックのみでは正しく開けない場合があります” as; Depending on the setting on the part of the mail sender, there is a case that you cannot open the file simply by clicking (the mouse). 1.“みで” should be “のみで” meaning “only by (clicking). 2."正しく開けない" means “unable to open (the file) properly. "メーラー" should be “mailer / mail sender.”


3

るい ー> りい is simply a linguistic transformation which occurs in the speech of Tokyoites, when I myself hear it I imagine it to come from a young male. 悪ぃ is simply another way to say 悪い and is not specific to the meaning of "My bad," although is can just as equally take this meaning in the right circumstance. For example in the following contexts https://...


7

「みで」is not the expression your looking for. That part of the sentence should be parsed クリック のみ では - "by only clicking" You're on the right track. By changing 正しい to 正しく it becomes an adverb, so you get 正しく開けない - "can't correctly open" メーラー is probably "mailer", perhaps you mistook the first kana?



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