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2

Since たがる means "to try to do something", you can use it as long as "to want" is interchangeable to "to try to do", (though たがる has contemptuous nuance and not desirable to aply to actions by a specific person who is supposed to be respected like your teacher). Otherwise, it doesn't work. As for your examples, in addition to Blavius's answer, "Do they want ...


2

When asking a question, you still will want to use たい instead of たがる. The reason for this is that がる really means that you are concluding based on certain observations, and also makes the sentence sound impersonal. This is why it is suitable for third person but not first person, because using it with the latter would make it sound like you're guessing your ...


5

彼はぜひ日本人です。 is not acceptable, I'm afraid. You use ぜひ this way: ぜひ参加してください。 'please' (for invitation/request) ぜひ参加させていただきます。 'by all means' (when accepting offer) 彼はきっと日本人です。 sounds fine. 'I believe he's Japanese' / 'I'm sure he's Japanese'. 彼は必ず日本人です。 is not acceptable. 必ず is used this way: 必ず来ます。 'without fail' (for future action) 寝る前に必ず歯を磨く。 'never fail ...


7

There are some fixed expressions such as: ご愁傷さまです お悔やみ申し上げます Both are formal, and can be used regardless of the relationship; you can say this to friends/colleagues/bosses. "ご愁傷さま" is sometimes used when nobody dies (e.g. ironically when somebody is disappointed) while "お悔やみ申し上げます" is almost always limited to the context of condolences, but both are ...


1

I'm not too sure about your sentence bc it seems pretty weird, but as for why the "te" form is used, it is used as a command. If I said 見て、見て! I would be communicating to "Look! Look!" as a direct command. However, I would not say 見る、見ま. I may say みろ but too me that sounds a bit rough, perhaps if I was a bit displeased. In excitement or urgency, I would use ...


4

I personally didn't know the very exact expression, but I can make a reasonable guess that it's a variant of サルでも…… ("Even monkeys do..."). The implication is quite similar to "for dummies" in English, which is to state its easiness in exaggerated manner. One of web pages using the phrase declares: ...



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