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2

Depends on the case - there are many ways to express a negative surprise. Example using 大変ですね which expresses some, but not excessive sympathy and cannot be used for "really bad" news. In some case can sound ironic, so be careful: 今朝、寝坊しました。// I overslept today 大変ですね! - // literally "so hard isn't it?", actually kind of "i am sorry for you" but ...


1

As for some sort of unfortunate event, there's the good old 気の毒 as well. 可哀そう could work in certain circumstances too. Or, as mentioned, 残念 too. It's all very circumstantial as user1713450 points out. Aさん: は~、昨日、うちの猫が死んでもうたんよ。 Sigh... my cat kicked the bucket yesterday. Bさん: えっ!?ほんま?あんなに元気やったのに?気の毒やわぁ。 What! You're shitting me? He was so full of ...


0

Just adding to the list: you can use 残念だ as a reaction. As an aside.. Otherwise, for any illness you generally can say お大事に or お大事にどうぞ or お大事にしてください, etc. In English, this would be like saying "Get well soon".


5

That depends on the actual thing they’re expressing shock toward, formality, etc. just like in any language. Various interjections include まさか, しまった (my go-to interjection when something upsets me and I’d say “oh balls” or “aw shit” in English), うわぁ, うそだろう, あら(ま), 大変だ, etc. Something like “I’m sorry for your loss” as a reaction to very bad news would be ...


3

When I was barely talking Japanese riding taxi was one of the easiest tasks. The basic algorithm is as follows: Immediately after getting into taxi tell //some landmark next to your place// までお願いします。Taxi drivers know all landmarks around and rarely ask for directions to there. If a driver asks which way is preferred, it is easier to just answer 速い方 - ...


0

Giving directions「道順、みちじゅん」 to a taxi driver in Japan is not as complex as it is in other countries. The custom in Japan is to suggest the nearest bus or train station that is within walking distance from your destination. Below there are two informative examples for accessing common places and a third example of thorough directions personally given to me. ...


0

I usually use clearly visible markers and don't worry too much about keigo: 赤い車の後ろの[辺]{へん}でいいですよ。 [角]{かど}の自動販売機でお願いします。 Something like that. Basically I give the same directions as cab drivers anywhere. I don't assume they know how to count^ so I try to avoid counters. :-) ^ i.e., while it's easy for you as the passenger to count the "fifth house ...


2

The expression「無理しないで」is used in most situations for showing concern for someone who may expose herself/himself in doing an "impossible" activity that pushes them to their limits while a more refined 「ご無理なさいませんよう、ご自愛ください」could also be used. 「ご無理なさらずに」 which literally translates to "don't do the impossible" is adopting 「なさる」as an elegant way of saying「する」。 ...


10

無理しないでください is one very common way of saying something along the lines of "don't do more than you can". It's also used to mean "don't wear yourself out" in a physical sense, but can be used in virtually any context.



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