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19

As a native speaker, I would say: 剣道をがんばっている。 or 剣道でがんばっている。 But, these are a little bit colloquial. When I want to be more formal, I will say: 剣道に励んでいる。 or, simply, いっしょうけんめい剣道をしている。


18

Your book is correct. When talking about human body temperature, 三十 is often omitted, probably because it is obvious. While there is nothing wrong with saying 37度8分 (37.8 degrees Celsius), it is often abbreviated to 7度8分. Even 37度 (37 degrees Celsius) without a fractional part sometimes becomes 7度. You cannot abbreviate the temperature when it is 40 ...


17

We normally say [三十分]{さんじゅっぷん}. Some people say [半時間]{はんじかん}, but I think it's only used in Kansai area. 参考に・・→ OKWave「半時間って方言ですか」 P.S. I'm from Kyoto but actually I've never noticed any of my friends say 半時間... Most of them are in/from Kyoto, Osaka, or Shiga. I think it's more used by older people (probably in Osaka?), because the only two people I can ...


14

Repeating the same noun twice as inNounというNoun here has the meaning of "all": …窓という窓が夕日に照らされて赤くキラキラ輝いている。 "...all of the windows are being shined on by the evening sun and are sparkling red." Separately, Time NounというTime Noun can also emphasize time words, but that's a different usage, e.g.: 今日という今日 "today of all days" (Reference: definition ...


12

As @sawa answered earlier, it means "like this" or "in this way". For future reference, 〜通り{どおり} can also be used in many places: 教科書通り{きょうかしょどおり} → by the book 憲法通り{けんぽうどおり} → by the constitution 規則通り{きそくどおり} → by the rules


11

"Teach" in this case is simply "tell" -- i.e., "inform someone of something they did not know previously". As to why folks in Japan use 教える instead of 伝える or some other verb, that may have to be chalked up to cultural, historical, and linguistic differences. ADDENDUM: By way of example of "cultural, historical, and linguistic differences", it bears noting ...


11

パンドラの箱を開ける Sorry if you expected something cooler. You can say this in Japanese and be understood, however the norm might be to phrase it in a more direct way. http://eow.alc.co.jp/search?q=Pandora%27s+box&ref=sa If you want a more Japanese equivalent, this entry from the link above has a few alternatives: open a Pandora's box ...


10

I applaud your courage to try something new and more sophisticated, when you can so easily use some safe & mandane expressions like お久しぶり! Unfortunately, things like this entirely depend on the context and what your perceived character is to the other person, for there's always some context in which almost any expression is appropriate. For example, if ...


10

It means "just like this", "just as you see". Probably the governor was bowing or something to show the act of begging, and wanted to show how serious he/she was. The nuance would be something like "Please look at me. I am begging seriously just like this."


10

早速ですが has a nuance of making an excuse for jumping to the main point directly, where some might expect a bit of smalltalk or an introduction beforehand. Whereas では or じゃ are pretty neutral like "Well", 早速ですが would probably be translated like "Let's get right down to business", "Let me get straight to the point" or "Sorry for being a bit rushed". Or ...


10

While both ~必要がある and ~なくてはいけない are used to express that something is necessary or must be done, they are both used slightly differently. Take for example the following sentances: コンピュータを再起動する必要があります。 You need to restart the computer. コンピュータを再起動しなくてはいけません。 You/I/etc must restart the computer. In the above sentances 必要があります is less ...


10

As a generic you can't go wrong with こんにちは. For example on Facebook or twitter I see posts by companies often that start with こんにちは. It depends on the context, of course, so if there's a situation where time of day is just understood then you can use that greeting. Or you can give a twist to it and start with ハロー!


10

Greetings on the internet are largely the same as those that would be done on the phone or in person. こんにちは with be fine for a friend etc お疲れ様です would be fine for a work colleage はじめまして for someone you are meeting of the first time. うっす is even acceptable for very casual situations.


10

The most common reply among us native speakers would be a simple 「ありがとうございます。」. 「はい」 would sound pretty strange. You could say 「はい、ありがとうございます。」, though.


10

無理しないでください is one very common way of saying something along the lines of "don't do more than you can". It's also used to mean "don't wear yourself out" in a physical sense, but can be used in virtually any context.


9

AFAIK, it means more or less the same thing as お疲れ様 (おつかれさま). But the nuance is to whom you say it. お疲れ様 is used for colleagues or superiours ("highers"), ご苦労様 I believe is only used from superiours to subordinates ("highers" to "lowers"). So you'd probably only say it if you have people "working" under you, such as direct subordinates at a job, if you're ...


9

「それが人生」, while everyone will understand it, does sound pretty "translated". You will probably hear it more often in fiction than in real life. Thing is 「人生」 is a bigger word for us than "life" is for you. When we talk about an "everyday" kind of life, we use 「[生活]{せいかつ}」 or 「[暮]{く}らし」, not 「人生」. 「人生」 sounds more long-term and philosophical, which is ...


8

やる時はやる means "When [you/I] (really decide to) do things, [you/I] do them". The nuance is that you don't just try to do them, you do them and do them well. The expression conveys that a person has the ability to do things well when they put their minds to it, even if they are slow to act in the first place.


8

It is relatively gentle, and a good way of allaying fears or dispelling misconceptions. お邪魔みたいですので、これで失礼しますね… It seems like I'm interrupting you, so I'll see myself out... そんなこと(は)ないですよ Not at all! / Don't be silly! / No such thing! かなり怖い人だそうですけど… I heard he's quite a scary person... そんなことない Not at all. If by your last question you mean can ...


8

Less aggressive / forceful and more matter-of-factly way of saying "What's it to you?", "None of your business" There are several strategies for countering an invasion of your private matters, as you can see from this conceptual diagram: my idea of "private matters" ------------------> A me | you ...


8

・[一対一]{いったいいち}で/[一対一]{いちたいいち}で=二人きりで, one-to-one, person-to-person ・で is not a typo. We say 「一対一で対応する。」not 「一対一対応する。」 ・I think both 一対一 and 1対1 are equally common, but probably the former is more formal. 一対一で対応する**(=仕事、役目、または「**さん」等の人物名・・・?)は、大変だね。= I think **(kind of work, position etc?) is such tough work, because you have to deal with someone ...


8

sum-u has several meanings. The core meaning is for something to to come to an end, conclude. From this, it also takes on the meaning for something to be settled, at rest, or under control (as a result of something being concluded). Putting this together, ki ga sum-u is "for ones feelings to be at rest / under control", hence content. The negative form, ki ...


8

いったい is not rude unless you make it rude. It has no inherent rudeness within it, but because it carries a fairly strong notion that one doesn't know what's going on, it can be seen as rude if you direct it at someone to express frustration. Like you say, I always liken it to the English phrase "on Earth," as in "What on Earth are you doing here?" This ...


8

A possible (but not really equivalent) translation of this might be "good time of day". Such words (including こんばんちは、おはこんにばんは and other variations on the theme) are very informal and are somewhat humorous. They might be used when the speaker does not know the time of the day, or pretends to. For example, it's somewhat common on various personal blogs, since ...


7

Yes it might be redundant and ungrammatical, but I think I say and write that way quite often... I think I also use 一瞬だけ and ほんの一瞬 but I think I tend to use ほんの一瞬だけ when I want to emphasize 'only'. I think it's similar to たった一回だけ/たった一度だけ, which seem also redundant but I use quite often... so maybe these expressions are rather casual and colloquial.


7

You make a fine wife. 「君はいい奥さんになるよ」/「君はいい奥さんになれるよ」 You'd make a cute Red Riding Hood. 「かわいい赤ずきんになれるよ」


7

The meaning is the same. If we compare できるだけ and できる限り, できる限り (literally “to the limit one can”) sounds stronger than できるだけ (literally “as much as one can”), so the nuance is slightly different, but not much. While onteria_’s answer and the answers on Goo to which it links have some points, I think that they are describing the difference between the two ...


7

I honestly don't think there's any way to answer this given the condition that it should be polite, even with Japanese's overgrown arsenal of euphemisms and niceties. I can't think of one in English either; probably because any insinuation of the sentiment "get lost" is universally obvious. But depending on the situation, you might be able to get away with ...


7

It actually has two meanings. When it is put after the predicate like your original example, it means "just now", and it conflicts with 最近 "recent". That is why your sentence was corrected. # 正直に言うと、最近アメリカのドラマを観ていたばかり。 (Meaningly odd) 'Being honest, I have just now been watching American dramas recently.' If you put it within the predicate phrase ...


7

いかない is less often a problem as it's derived from 行く, but いけない can be both the negative potential form of the verb 行く "to go" and the negative form of the verb 行ける "to be good (at)/to go well/to be acceptable." 6 Therefore いかない and いけない may appear to be similar, but they can actually be totally different. いかない "won't go/doesn't go" from 行く: ...



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