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4

I wouldn't touch upon the provenances of お開き as a mean to avoid 忌み言葉 - ominous word / phrase as they were detailed by other users, and most of today's people wouln't give any thought about it. I wonder how many Japanese would associate it with 忌み言葉 today unless they are oct or nonagenarians. I just would like to say お開き is very popular word which is used ...


9

Euphemism vs. Taboo Words [婉曲語法]{えんきょくごほう} vs. [忌]{い}み[言葉]{ことば} 「[閉]{と}じる」 ("to close") is considered a taboo word for auspicious events such as a wedding party (even though the word itself is something we use without thinking on a daily basis). Thus, we choose to say 「お[開]{ひら}きにする」 to mean "bring (a happy event) to an end". 「閉じる」 is not the only 忌み言葉 ...


0

Well, I'm not an expert on Japanese, but as a Chinese who is learning Japanese, I'd like to offer something from this perspective. The dictionary says かわいい can be written as 可愛い while かわいそう can be written as 可哀相. For a Chinese this seems quite straight-forward. You see, in Chinese, 愛 means "love" and 哀 means "pity", and these two characters have the same ...


6

Yes, ~するでない is an old-fashioned and pompous way of saying "Don't do ~!". In modern Japanese, this is a kind of 役割語 (stereotyped role words) which is typically used by noble and/or old people in manga and samurai dramas. This seems to have been used a lot more 100 years ago or so, because I can find many similar expressions (eg. 泣くでない, 穢すでない, 淋しがるでない) in ...



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