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3

Your kanji are correct. [受]{う}け[身]{み}. You can also write it [受]{うけ}[身]{み}. The general meaning of 受け身, however, is not "receiving body" but "passive." Thus, the passive voice "it is written by him" (vs. active "he writes"). I am not familiar with your martial art, but I would guess that it means you take a passive rather than active role in the combat -- ...


4

Etymology There are numerous theories about this. Japanese: The theories restricted to Japanese origins all revolve around the ideas of some larger geographic area that was split into "upper" (-kami or -gami) and "lower" (-shimo) halves. The main theories listed at the JA Wikipedia article on 武蔵国 (Musashi no Kuni) and at the Nihon Jiten page here ...


5

My assumption would be that neoguri is one way of romanizing the hangul 너구리, but that the pronunciation is closer to "noguri." Given the tendency of katakana to go with pronunciation, it would be ノグリー. Listen to the Korean here.


3

I answered this question a while back, but unfortunately I only half-understood it, and there was some wrong information in it. After some time researching this question, and now an entire semester of a course about Japanese adjectives, I am ready to answer it again. As such, I have deleted my previous answer. So, since しい appears to attach to the 未然形 of a ...


0

What about ~であれ~であれ and ~といい~といい? Oh, there's also ~にせよ~にせよ, but it's just a more 堅い version of ~にしろ~にしろ (which in turn is more 堅い than ~にしても~にしても)


4

These are (deverbal) noun-noun compounds: The first noun is either an adjunct to or an argument of the verb. The second noun is a deverbal form of a verb—specifically, its 連用形 ("continuative form"), a verb form used as a noun. When the nouns are put together, rendaku ("sequential voicing") sometimes occurs: If the first noun is an adjunct, ...


4

This is a common pattern of taking a noun + particle + verb combination and shortening the verb to it's stem form: As Choko points out in her comment to your question: 日に焼ける drops the particle に and changes 焼ける into the stem 焼け => 日焼け 炭火で焼く drops the particle で and changes 焼く into the stem 焼き => 炭火焼き 家で飲む drops the particle で and changes 飲む ...


5

the katsu karē (カツカレー) dish was from English inspiration originally Although カレー(curry), or カレーライス(curry rice), has a British inspiration as @virmaior says (Curry was introduced to Japan during the Meiji era (1868–1912) by the British... / 今、日本人が一般に食べている「カレーライス」は、「インドのカレー」ではなく、「イギリスのカレー」です), the dish カツカレー(curry rice with pork cutlet) itself was not ...


-1

The word katsu (カツ) is just the English word, "cuts" written as katakana according to how a Japanese person would pronounce it (ka tsu). Also, as pointed out above, it may have its origins from the word "cutlets" which is written out as カツレツ (ka tsu re tsu).


5

A couple of things to add: When you hear just カツ, it is usually indicative of pork cutlets ([豚]{とん}カツ). Any other types are listed explicitly with what they actually are. For example, chicken cutlets are チキンカツ, beef is ビーフカツ, etc. カレー is Japanese style curry, not to be confused with カリー which is Indian style curry. カツ丼 is the greatest food ever!


7

Your hypothesis that カツ stems from cutlet seems correct. According to kotobank, カツ is the shortened form of カツレツ, i.e. cutlet. See here for its culinary history.



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