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3

Although 故事ことわざ辞典 says 一石二鳥 is a direct translation of ”kill two birds with one stone” into the form of 四字熟語 (Chinese / Japanese idioms composed of four characters), I’m not sure of it, because the Chinese have exactly the same phrase 一石二鳥 (yī shí èr niǎo). We might have imported 一石二鳥 from Chinese, or the Chinese imported the proverb we translated from ...


5

The reason for this is related to how Kanji were taken from Chinese. See this link for more information. As time passes, which Kanji are used commonly and for which connotations may change. For example I haven't seen "首肯く" commonly (it doesn't come up in the conversion list when I hit space bar), but "肯く" is more common. Also, in some cases there may be ...


3

I would like to share a more cultural ideology of the meaning. In Chinese 大 means big. 丈夫 mean husband in a more traditional way (think ancient Chinese dynasty). There are other traditional ways to call a husband such as 相公 and 夫官 (I heard this one from the empress of the founding emperor of Han dynasty in a drama :D) A more modern word for husband in ...


4

The character of 體 (today 体 in 当用漢字) meaning the body is composed of the characters of 骨 meaning human and creatures’ bones on the left side and 豊 meaning rich on the right side. According to「常用字解」compiled by the great scholar, Chinese character / language etymologist, 白川静 and published by 平凡社, the letter of 骨 features the shape of the bones above the ...


1

Almost certainly not. The likely reason has to do with Buddhist statuary: a particular buddha called Yakushi has his fourth finger bent in many poses. More about the finger on the Japanese Wikipedia: https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/薬指 More about this particular Buddha on the English Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhaisajyaguru


2

體 is the old traditional-Chinese spelling (旧字体【きゅうじたい】) of modern simplified spelling (新字体【しんじたい】) 体. The radical of the older form is 骨, "bone". More information about the character is available on Wiktionary: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/體


5

First, 同じ is not a noun; 同じ by itself cannot serve as a subject or the object of a transitive verb. For example, 同じが言える and 同じを見る are ungrammatical. About 「同{おな}じ」 and 「同{おな}じく」 「同じ」という単語の品詞なんですが、形容詞でいいんですか? According to one dictionary, 同じ is a special 形容動詞 (≒na-adjective), which doesn't require な when it directly modifies a regular noun (see the third ...


3

To complement Avery's answer, one thing that may be worth investigating is that the Nihon Shoki has a particular phonetic orthography for Japanese (so-called Man’yōgana or ateji, which are directly based on Chinese and Korean phonetic use of kanji). Whereas the Kojiki and Man’yōshū phonograms are based on Early Middle Chinese (also the source of Japanese ...


5

I think that no one can give you a clear answer to the question at this time, because all of the words, ひ, ひる, よ, and よる have existed for a very very long time. It's just too difficult for present people to find out the origin of the four words. As far as I know, the words ひる, よ and よる were already common words for daily use in the Heian period (794 - ...



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