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33

It's not real Japanese. It's a munged version of 申します. In Shift_JIS encoding, only the first byte is guaranteed to have the high bit set, which means the second byte can sometimes be the same as a character in the ASCII range. This happens with U+7533 申, for which the second byte is encoded as 0x5C \. If someone is using software that tries to strip ...


17

No, this phrase isn't cognate with Standard Japanese あした. したっけ literally means what in Standard Japanese そうしたら. The demonstrative そう is omitted because the whole context before is considered to stand in place of it (colloquial omission of this そう is also common in Tokyo). The っけ part shares the same origin with Standard っけ ("(what) again?"), that is ...


15

In this case, 「[近]{ちか}い」 and 「[遠]{とお}い」 express temporal intervals and not spatial distances -- "at shorter intervals" and "at longer intervals", respectively. 「[尿]{にょう}が近い」 means "having the tendency of urinating frequently". 「尿が遠い」 means the opposite of that -- "not having to pee very often". We also say 「トイレが近い/遠い」 to mean the same thing.


14

As NicoNicoPedia explains: 飯テロとは、善良な市民に対し無差別に食欲を沸き立たせる、残忍で卑劣極まりない行為である。 これらの行為を絶対に許してはならない。これらの行為に決して屈してはならない。 Meshi-tero is a most brutal and cowardly act which indiscriminately makes virtuous citizens feel hunger. We must absolutely not allow or give in to these acts. Or as Hatena Keyword says: ...


14

The simplest explanation is that たばこ is often written in hiragana because it was borrowed so long ago that it has nativized. (Sorry, in a rush -- details to be posted later.) Update There are a few words that are definitely borrowings, but that were borrowed so long ago that they are treated as native terms, and they might even have kanji spellings. ...


10

So you're referring to ネーム in this sense, right? ネーム was originally jargon used in the Japanese (non-manga) publishing industry, where it means 'caption' (of figures, tables, etc.), a short text describing the essential point of a figure/table. Then it gained a broader sense, and it may also refer to any "floating" small fragment of text that has to be ...


10

朝鮮 comes from the Joseon dynasty, which is the longest-lasting Korean dynasty, whose rule lasted from the late 14th century all the way to the late 19th century. The use of this name can be chronicled in Chinese records from as early as 100 BC. After the fall of the Joseon dynasty, the Koreans changed their country name to 大韓帝国 "Daehan Jeguk," or the ...


9

Yes, many Japanese wonder why, too. The truth is that it's an obsolete usage of 天地 (except in this idiom!). 日本国語大辞典 (kind of the OED of Japanese) apparently has a definition: てん‐ち 【天地】 (...) (6)(─する)上下をひっくりかえすこと。 *滑稽本・早変胸機関〔1810〕「裾廻しは天地(テンチ)するだよ」 that is, 天地 once meant for "to turn upside down", at least attested on 1810 in Edo ...


9

"Come true" isn't the literal translation of 叶{かな}う. The word かなう means "to fit; match; accord", in this sense in accord with 叶's meaning in Classical Chinese. So we are practically saying 願いが叶う "my wish matches it" as if a fixed phrase corresponds to "my wish comes true". かなう once had tons of kanji transcriptions (see below), but most of them were culled ...


9

To tell the truth, this question was so unexpected for me who am not familiar with colloquial English that I couldn't figure out what it means if it weren't for an English speaker's guidance. Maybe I still don't grasp what you're asking, but there are so many reasons it couldn't be with ン. "Roman" in Japanese In English, Roman is an adjective derives ...


9

The 面白 comes from 面白い which as you probably know means "fun, interesting". The 半分 part means "half". The expression ”面白半分に” means literally to do something "half fun", "half serious" (as you hinted at). See the definition in the dictionary here. The "に" acts to make the phrase an adverb which is acting on a verb such as 見る or 言う in your examples. The ...


8

It's [熟字訓]{じゅくじくん}. Excerpt from Wiktionary: A Japanese word whose kanji spelling conveys the meaning based on the individual characters, but the reading is not directly related to the spellling. For example, 大 (“big”, usually read ō in kun'yomi compounds) and 人 (“person”, usually read hito in kun'yomi compounds) combine to form 大人, meaning “adult” but ...


8

良い can be read both いい and よい. 良{よ}い is more formal than いい. But they are very similar words and they sometimes can safely exchangeable. For example, the following words are the same and both mean "good boy/girl". いい子{こ} 良{よ}い子{こ} Sometimes, いい cannot replace with 良い in casual language. For instance, in Japanese version of Facebook you call "Like" button, ...


8

This 願わくば is a fixed expression fossilized long ago, and you just have to memorize it without thinking about it too much. It's a literary expression that corresponds to "Hopefully, ..." used as a sentence adverb. As pointed out in the comment, this is related to ク語法, a grammatical feature which had already dropped out of use more than 1000 years ago. It was ...


7

It comes from Classical Japanese idiomatic phrase とにかくに, analyzed into と ("some way") + に ("in") + かく ("that way; such a way") + に ("in"), and as a whole meant for "by some means or other" or "by any means". The kanji you may often see (兎に角) is ateji.


7

I don't have any clue to decide whether it's a parallel evolution or not, but I guess it's from Chinese, considering the phrase is attested in a famous (1st century BC) Classical Chinese literature, namely Shiji, and the fact all Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Vietnamese shares the similar expressions. 大行不顧細謹,大禮不辭小讓。如今人方為刀俎,我為魚肉,何辭為。 The most powerful ...


7

The verbs 選{えら}ぶ, 選{えら}む and 選{よ}る are thought to be derived from the original verb 選{え}る. Here's what 日本国語大辞典 has to say about the etymology of 選ぶ: 動詞「える(選)」の未然形に、継続を表わす「ふ」の付いたもの。万葉仮名により、上代では、「ふ」は清音であったと考えられる。 Of course, this dictionary is using the traditional analysis where words are segmented on kana boundaries, in which the ...


7

(Only answering your second half) [我]{われ} is used in Japanese, but is seen as more archaic and/or somewhat boastful. 我々 → We/us 「我は拳を極めし者」 → I am the supreme master of the fist (Gouki/Akuma from the Street Fighter series). 我思うゆえに我あり → I think, therefore I am. When read as が, 我 is used to mean the ego, or the abstract self. 我の強い人 → A ...


7

Surveying various resources, here's what I've found: Shogakukan's 国語大辞典 states it's from either Dutch or English alcohol (my local copy: "(オランダ・英alcohol)") Different editions of Daijirin state either Dutch definitively (my local copy: "アルコール [0] 【(オランダ) alcohol】") or possibly English (third edition, online here: "アルコール .【alcohol】" -- implying English if ...


7

The primary meaning of the verb 読む in ancient Japanese was to count. よむ is primarily defined as 数える in 学研全訳古語辞典: ①順に数える。数を数える。 「月よめばいまだ冬なり」 [訳] 月日を数えると、まだ冬である。 And according to 国語教育わたしの主張: 日本最古の歴史物語である古事記(紀元七一二)や風土記では、読むは「数える」という意味であった。 Then it began to mean to say out loud, to chant, because that's what people do when counting things. Then ...


7

Origins of 屋根{やね} 屋根{やね} is a compound of 屋{や} "house, dwelling" + 根{ね} "root → fundament, base supporting the whole". This word is quite old, appearing already in poem 779 of the Man'yōshū, one of the oldest pieces of written Japanese dating to 759, with parts that appear to be older still. The age of this term might point to its origins: houses in ...


7

Many people have wondered why, but I failed to find the authoritative explanation for this. At least デジタル大辞泉 says nothing more than that ツキ means luck. (By the way, this kind of 付き is usually written either in hiragana or katakana, perhaps because even native speakers don't know why the kanji 付 is associated with this word.) Anyway, つく (憑く) sometimes means ...


6

I'm afraid I don't have any authoritative reference, but have you checked the Wikipedia article 婦人? 大正デモクラシーの時期、婦人という語は、普通選挙権要求運動とも連動し、斬新な響きを持った。「婦人公論」に代表されるように、「意識の高い成人女性」との響きさえあった。 婦人という語感が、「年輩女性」「既婚女性」との意味合いを持つようになり、次第に使われなくなった。 現代の日本語においてより一般化した呼称が「女性」である。「婦人」の語はやや古めかしいイメージを持つ古語になりつつある。 So 婦人 was a stylish word back in the early 20th ...


6

That is because the cursive script of the kanji 「川」 kind of looks like 「つ」. It should look even more like 「ツ」.


6

Shogakukan's 大国語辞典 shows that 姪【めい】 has a historical hiragana spelling of めひ, not めい, showing that the modern mei reading is not on'yomi but rather kun'yomi. This different derivation is probably also why the pronunciation is different: [mei] with a more distinct [i], and not [meː]. The term for "nephew", 甥【おい】, has a historical hiragana spelling of をひ. ...


6

That Japanese Wikipedia entry says "エースおよびデュースは元々それぞれダイスの1および2を表す言葉である。以前は3〜6はそれに倣って順にトレイ、ケイト、シンク、サイスと呼んでいた事もある" and English Wikipedia entry about dice says the following: "While the terms ace, deuce, trey, cater, cinque and sice have been made obsolete by one to six, they are still used by some professional gamblers to designate different sides of ...


6

Yes, ~するでない is an old-fashioned and pompous way of saying "Don't do ~!". In modern Japanese, this is a kind of 役割語 (stereotyped role words) which is typically used by noble and/or old people in manga and samurai dramas. This seems to have been used a lot more 100 years ago or so, because I can find many similar expressions (eg. 泣くでない, 穢すでない, 淋しがるでない) in ...


5

I highly doubt that they translated directly from Hebrew. The first complete translation of the bible is the [明治元訳聖書]{めいじげんやくせいしょ}, which was first published 1880. It contained already the name エデン. Before this, attempts were made to translate a Chinese versions into Japanese. In Chinese the modern name for Eden is [伊甸]{yīdiàn}. An older name (~1875) was ...


5

It's surprisingly easy to trace the origin of 女性観 since 日本国語大辞典 (日国) cites its first appearance. *吾輩は猫である〔1905〜06〕〈夏目漱石〉一一「古来の賢哲が女性観を紹介すべし」 But I don't much think it's appropriate to say it was "coined", because it's but an ordinary idea to put them together if you know both the words 女性 and 観. By the way, 女性 itself seems to have gained the meaning ...


5

申し上げる has two different meanings. The first one is "to say" in a humble form, the second is "to do" also in a humble form. Here is an excerpt from a dictionary regarding the latter one: もうし‐あ・げる〔まうし‐〕【申(し)上げる】 「お」や「御 (ご) 」の付いた自分の行為を表す体言に付けて、その行為の対象を敬う。…してさしあげる。「お答え―・げます」「御相談―・げたく参上致しました」 Although the compound verb 申し上げる contains a 申す part related to ...



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