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7

Many people have wondered why, but I failed to find the authoritative explanation for this. At least デジタル大辞泉 says nothing more than that ツキ means luck. (By the way, this kind of 付き is usually written either in hiragana or katakana, perhaps because even native speakers don't know why the kanji 付 is associated with this word.) Anyway, つく (憑く) sometimes means ...


6

That Japanese Wikipedia entry says "エースおよびデュースは元々それぞれダイスの1および2を表す言葉である。以前は3〜6はそれに倣って順にトレイ、ケイト、シンク、サイスと呼んでいた事もある" and English Wikipedia entry about dice says the following: "While the terms ace, deuce, trey, cater, cinque and sice have been made obsolete by one to six, they are still used by some professional gamblers to designate different sides of ...


6

Yes, ~するでない is an old-fashioned and pompous way of saying "Don't do ~!". In modern Japanese, this is a kind of 役割語 (stereotyped role words) which is typically used by noble and/or old people in manga and samurai dramas. This seems to have been used a lot more 100 years ago or so, because I can find many similar expressions (eg. 泣くでない, 穢すでない, 淋しがるでない) in ...


5

[翻]{ひるがえ}す is a transitive verb of [翻]{ひるがえ}る. It seems that it shows the movement of a flag originally. This theory remains a matter of speculation. 翻る…[旗]{はた}が翻る(A flag flaps)  →ひらひらと[裏]{うら}[返]{がえ}る→ひるがえる others: [蘇]{よみがえ}る…[死者]{ししゃ}が蘇る(The dead revive)  →[黄泉]{よみ}から[帰]{かえ}る→よみがえる ※黄泉 is the land of the dead. I did not understand about ...


5

Originally, these kanji were thought to be pronounced as: 右衛門: u we mon But since Japanese u and consonant w have little difference, the actual pronunciation was like: 右衛門: wwe~we mon Later, undergone the phonological change that merged wi, we, wo into i, e, o: 右衛門: e mon So the truth is 右 and 衛 share a single syllable, but the fact has ...


4

It's an interesting question, but as far as I googled, I was not able to track any evidence that links sharks with the birds' (names). For examples, popular "exceptions" from yours are . . . 甚平鮫, Jinbeizame, in English, whale sharks was named after because of their body appearances and patterns look like that of 甚平,a Japanese haori, and another popular ...


4

Background This was quite an interesting bit of research. These now-mostly-obsolete Japanese terms look very Latinate, but as many commenters have noted, the phonetics do not align as expected. After some digging, I've figured out why -- they are not directly from any Latinate language. The source was actually English, much to my surprise. The ...


3

ひるがえす・ひるがえる Nariuji's answer above for 翻す matches what I've researched in the past. ひる, ひら, even ふる (as in 振る) all seem to be related to ideas of something flat waving or flapping, cognate with 鰭{ひれ} fin, and possibly even cognate with 簸{ひ}る (ancient root verb ふ) to winnow (by shaking grain). くつがえす・くつがえる Looking specifically at 覆す・覆る, this appears to be ...



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