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7

To answer the title question first, yes, it is. Roughly, I am going to say that it happens incidentally 90% of the time and intentionally the rest of the time. This comes from innocent ignorance 80-90% of the time as the English word "flea" is simply not known nearly as widely as the word "free" among the average people. The word 「フリー」(from "free") is ...


5

I'd like to add some more detail onto Zhen Lin's answer. My source is primarily Shogakukan's 1988 version of their Kokugo Dai Jiten Dictionary, Shinsou-ban (Revised edition). Morphology and Phonology Modern 出{で}来{き}る comes from older 出{で}来{く}る, comes from older 出{で}来{く}, comes from older 出{い}で来{く}. The oldest form is clearly a compound of 出{い}づ + 来{く}. ...


4

I think it's related to the sense mentioned by Brandon, from an underlying idea of "something that sticks out visually", hence the use of 目{め} "eye". This same sense of "visually notable or prominent feature" gives rise to many other uses of 目{め}, such as 結{むす}び目{め} "knot" from 結{むす}び "tying" + 目{め} "visually prominent feature", or 籠{かご}目{め} "lattice" from ...


4

Etymology There are numerous theories about this. Japanese: The theories restricted to Japanese origins all revolve around the ideas of some larger geographic area that was split into "upper" (-kami or -gami) and "lower" (-shimo) halves. The main theories listed at the JA Wikipedia article on 武蔵国 (Musashi no Kuni) and at the Nihon Jiten page here ...


4

This is a remnant of the Classical Japanese form named 「[命令形]{めいれいけい}の[放任法]{ほうにんほう}」. 命令形 means "imperative form", 放任、”noninterference”, "permission", etc. and 法, "rule". Native speakers, young or old, still use the 命令形の放任法 on a daily basis, but very few Japanese-learners seem to be able use it actively. In short, the nuance of this form is "Do as you ...


3

Both links explain that フリーマーケット comes from "flea market" not "free market" but the term needs some disambiguation. 蚤 (のみ)is the 漢字 for flea and the プログレッシブ dictionary lists 蚤の市 as "a flea market" The following extract from your second link explains the above and that フリー is not "free" but "flea": [Q:]英語でフリーマーケットは? [A:] ...


3

According to a dictionary, この語の成立については未詳。一説に「ぬあった」の転かともいう source


3

I think there are multiple interpretations of this character, but it's clearly a combination of 辶 (from 辶) and 軍, which suggests the movement-related meaning came first and "luck" was a derived meaning. But how was it derived? Here's what Henshall has to say: 辶 is movement 129. 軍 is army 466 q.v. Some scholars take the latter in a literal sense, ...


3

Your kanji are correct. [受]{う}け[身]{み}. You can also write it [受]{うけ}[身]{み}. The general meaning of 受け身, however, is not "receiving body" but "passive." Thus, the passive voice "it is written by him" (vs. active "he writes"). I am not familiar with your martial art, but I would guess that it means you take a passive rather than active role in the combat -- ...


1

Wild speculation, but it could be related to sense 10 in 大辞泉: 10 線状に1列に並んだものの間にできたすきまや凹凸。「櫛【くし】の―」 A gap or unevenness occurring between items arranged in a line. kushi no - [me] (the gaps between the teeth of a comb) And from this notion, the notion of first, second, third. Or, maybe it's just 当て字 for some homophonous grammatical suffix. I ...



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