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7

It's Kansai dialect. I don't think it's official 敬語 recognized by 文科省. It's 尊敬語. 食べはる ≒ 食べられる, 召し上がる [来]{き}はる ≒ [来]{こ}られる, いらっしゃる 先生が来はった。≒ 先生が来られた, 先生がいらっしゃった I think ~~はる sounds less polite/formal than the standard 尊敬語. I think it comes from なさる (--> なはる --> はる ?)


5

There is no hidden meaning in the 「見」 part of those verbs -- none. First, not that I think you are mistaken, I want to make sure that we are not discussing the kanji 「見」 here. Instead, we are discussing the 連用形 of the verb 「見る」, which only happens to be 「見」. 連用形 is the form of the verb that comes first in [複合動詞]{ふくごうどうし} , two-verb compound verbs, which ...


5

「[割]{わ}る」 here means "to dilute". See meaning #II-4 in http://kotobank.jp/jeword/%E5%89%B2%E3%82%8B?dic=pje3&oid=SPJE04759100 「[泡盛]{あわもり}のコーヒー割り」 = "awamori diluted with coffee" Other common terms containing 「割り」: ウイスキーのソーダ割り/[水]{みず}割り [焼酎]{しょうちゅう}のウーロン[茶]{ちゃ}割り


5

おてもと does refer to chopsticks but it is not "another word for chopsticks." That is, you won't say おてもとを取ってください nor 新しいおてもとを買ってこようかな. According to the source article that Chocolate's Wikipedia article mentions, the word came from a reference to "お手もと箸" (chopsticks for your personal use) in contrast to "お取り箸", which refers to chopsticks for shared dishes that ...


5

コーヒー割り “split / divided coffee” No, it is コーヒー modifying 割り, not the other way around. Japanese is left-branching in an almost completely consistent way. Keeping that meaning of 割る, it would be “split / divided by/with coffee”. As others have explained, 割る here means dilute, by which you reach the expected meaning.


4

Zokugo-dict says that the word ポイ捨て (litter) is a contraction of ポイと捨てる. And ポイと is an adverb meaning "carelessly/nonchalantly" (throw away/toss aside). It seems that now ポイ捨て got further contracted into just ポイ.


4

I didn't know of 泡盛 until I looked it up just now in Wikipedia but I think 〜割り is often used when you dilute a drink (probably alcoholic like 泡盛)with something else. The one I am most familiar with is ウイスキー水割り, which is whiskey diluted with iced water, often ordered by salary-men in hostess/entertainment clubs/old-fashioned Karaoke bars. In your case it ...


4

見殺し might be similar to 萌え殺し, 飼い殺し, 褒め殺し, 棄て殺し. I think it means 見ることによって、人を殺す, that is, 見る=殺す. 見捨てる might be similar to 見限る, 見切る and 見放す. Maybe, the 見 in these words more or less contains a kind of “passive” or “inactive” feeling, something like 面倒を見ていられないから、しかたなくやめる. As for the etymology, my hypothesis is 見 might mean “to experience” here. It seems that ...


4

As you suggested, by adding 見【み】 in 見殺し the implication is that you're standing by and watching it happen (read: not intervening). For 見捨てる【みすてる】 it's more along the lines of "get out of my sight" in English—someone is being cast out. Since the focus is on etymology and not simply defining things, however, let's take a look at others in this family: ...


3

Thousands of 熟語s in Japanese are created in such a way. 岩石(がんせき) ≒ 岩(いわ) (rock) 河川(かせん) ≒ 川(かわ) (river) 絵画(かいが) ≒ 絵(え) (picture) 自己(じこ) ≒ 己(おのれ) (oneself) 身体(しんたい) ≒ 体(からだ) (body) I don't know the reason. That's how it is. EDIT: Japanese Wikipedia describes the simple reason. One kanji character was not long enough to be distinguishable with each other ...


3

Why don't you post this question in Chinese Language Stack Exchange? Both 見 and 光 should be 会意. The 儿 parts are actually “人”. 風 is 凡+虫(animals, not insects). For some reasons, consonant endings “-m” and “-ng” in old Chinese were sometimes used interchangeably, so 風 and 凡 were homophones. Similarly 鳳 contains the 凡 part too. As for 花, 雪, 時, 島, etc. you can ...


2

校 isn't the character for "school", it's a character for "school". Here are some of the others: 塾, 学, 學, 宗, 斈, 泮, 黉, 院, 黌, ... Characters are not a neat logical mapping of one picture to one concept. In fact characters are not even Japanese, as I'm sure you know. Characters evolved over thousands of years in China. This means meanings changed, characters ...


1

According to Wikipedia, it would appear that there were in fact a wide range of characters used for any given sound prior to the de-facto standardization that was the creation of the Kana syllabaries (keeping in mind, of course, that at their roots the kana characters are either cursive forms of characters [ひらがな] or isolated elements of characters [カタカナ]). ...



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