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7

良い can be read both いい and よい. 良{よ}い is more formal than いい. But they are very similar words and they sometimes can safely exchangeable. For example, the following words are the same and both mean "good boy/girl". いい子{こ} 良{よ}い子{こ} Sometimes, いい cannot replace with 良い in casual language. For instance, in Japanese version of Facebook you call "Like" button, ...


7

To tell the truth, this question was so unexpected for me who am not familiar with colloquial English that I couldn't figure out what it means if it weren't for an English speaker's guidance. Maybe I still don't grasp what you're asking, but there are so many reasons it couldn't be with ン. "Roman" in Japanese In English, Roman is an adjective derives ...


6

I don't have any clue to decide whether it's a parallel evolution or not, but I guess it's from Chinese, considering the phrase is attested in a famous (1st century BC) Classical Chinese literature, namely Shiji, and the fact all Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Vietnamese shares the similar expressions. 大行不顧細謹,大禮不辭小讓。如今人方為刀俎,我為魚肉,何辭為。 The most powerful ...


3

Kanji dictionaries (漢和字典) are what to look up when confronting questions like this. From what I've got from my dictionary: My dictionary states 逸 actually is linked to 兎 in origin: "rabbits run away" -> to run, to astray. For 安逸 and others, it states that they are used (in modern usage) in substitution for "佚", whose phonetic value is also "いつ". So 安逸 was ...


3

いちご is a native Japanese word, which is almost as old as the written records of Japanese itself. (Apparently it first appears as イチビコ in the 日本書記{にほんしょき} (8th century) and as イチゴ two centuries later in the 倭名類聚抄{わみょうるいじゅしょう}.) As practically all native Japanese words (like 雨{あめ} rain, 村{むら} village, etc.), いちご, too, was assigned a corresponding kanji from ...


3

According to this article in Japanese WP, -たい is the descendant of Middle Japanese -たし (-tasi), which ultimately traces back to Old Japanese (or Proto-Japonic) いたし (itasi; "sore, acute"). A paper referred by that page argues that this form has changed its meaning taking the path of "painful" → "sorely felt" → "of physiological necessity" → "of emotional ...


2

Chinese has 人为刀俎,我为鱼肉, which I must say matches the Vietnamese one more, and is well documented in its origins. The phrase (in chinese) is attested to Sima Qian of the Western Han dynasty, who wrote in 史記・項羽本紀: “如今人方為刀俎、我為魚肉。”, meaning "to be taken advantage of" Many thanks to China documenting its history so thoroughly. Its structure doesn't match ...


1

After consulting my physical Chinese dictionary (in Chinese), I would say that it's Chinese. I'm sure you can verify it with an online Chinese to English/Japanese dictionary though. No surprise though, since pretty much every kanji's etymology can be traced back to Chinese. The definitions and writings in Chinese and Japanese for the following multi-kanji ...


1

逸 itself means "escape" or "break loose". One one hand, this can be used for verbs such as 逸する, and on the other hand this "escape" has been taken in a more literary sense of "breaking loose", which it's not hard to see how it becomes "relax" or "leisure". This same meaning is present in Chinese. Breaking up the character As for the origins, 兔 is the ...



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