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7

To answer the title question first, yes, it is. Roughly, I am going to say that it happens incidentally 90% of the time and intentionally the rest of the time. This comes from innocent ignorance 80-90% of the time as the English word "flea" is simply not known nearly as widely as the word "free" among the average people. The word 「フリー」(from "free") is ...


4

This is a remnant of the Classical Japanese form named 「[命令形]{めいれいけい}の[放任法]{ほうにんほう}」. 命令形 means "imperative form", 放任、”noninterference”, "permission", etc. and 法, "rule". Native speakers, young or old, still use the 命令形の放任法 on a daily basis, but very few Japanese-learners seem to be able use it actively. In short, the nuance of this form is "Do as you ...


3

Both links explain that フリーマーケット comes from "flea market" not "free market" but the term needs some disambiguation. 蚤 (のみ)is the 漢字 for flea and the プログレッシブ dictionary lists 蚤の市 as "a flea market" The following extract from your second link explains the above and that フリー is not "free" but "flea": [Q:]英語でフリーマーケットは? [A:] ...


3

According to a dictionary, この語の成立については未詳。一説に「ぬあった」の転かともいう source


3

I think there are multiple interpretations of this character, but it's clearly a combination of 辶 (from 辶) and 軍, which suggests the movement-related meaning came first and "luck" was a derived meaning. But how was it derived? Here's what Henshall has to say: 辶 is movement 129. 軍 is army 466 q.v. Some scholars take the latter in a literal sense, ...



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