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17

乗り切る doesn't quite fit here because it's about enduring through a hardship. With 乗り切る, wave(s) of difficulties come and go while you persevere, where as in "get over it," you need to overcome it yourself. 乗り越える, 克服する and 打ち勝つ do have the sense of actively overcoming some obstacle, and may work if you use it together with the right noun. I'll come back to ...


14

So here's the Urban Dictionary's definition: A person who puts a large amount of effort into achieving a certain image, or counter-image, to the point where it is obviously contrived. Rather than achieving an image through genuine personality, the try-hard consciously attempts to fit a certain style through deliberate imitation, forced style, or scripted ...


11

When you want to translate names, just look for some famous ones in Wikipedia. ハスケル・カリー


10

You are using what could be interpreted as two different verbs: まける -> to lose しっぱいする -> to fail Formally, I usually hear "I cannot afford to fail" rather than "I don't want to fail". 失敗する余裕はありません。 If you want to sound cool, you could say "I don't have any intention on losing". 負けるつもりはありません。


10

I don't think there's a direct translation of "slice of life" into Japanese in the context of Anime genres, however I think 空気系{くうきけい} would be a close candidate. This genre is also sometimes called 日常系{にちじょうけい} (See also the Japanese Wikipedia article for 空気系). It means something like "atmosphere type", and refers to Anime which doesn't have any dramatic ...


10

I believe it will more sound natural if the sentence goes like this. 多くのオランダ人は自転車に乗ります。 This way it can mean "to use" "go by" or " take the" , which you want to tell.


10

As you have correctly guessed, 文章 refers to a group of sentences/paragraphs. To refer to a single sentence, simply use 文, which is perfectly fine as a technical term, too. 一文 means "one sentence". It's used when one needs to emphasize "one".


9

You can use 期【き】, シリーズ, 部【ぶ】, or シーズン, all of which are common. Here are the examples taken from Wikipedia (I haven't confirmed, but presumably these reflect the official namings): けいおん! 第2期 3年B組金八先生 第7シリーズ(2004年 - 2005年) Xファイル 第5シーズン (or シーズン5) 水戸黄門 第38部 (2008年) These are basically interchangeable, but here's my impression: 期: very ...


8

Literal translations such as 「(もっと/より)少なく + verb + したい」 would sound unnatural... There would be several ways to say that, but off the top of my head right now, I think you could probably use 「~を少なくしたい」 or 「~を減らしたい」, as in: 睡眠時間/寝る時間を減らしたい。 睡眠時間/寝る時間を少なくしたい。 I want to sleep less. (lit. I want to decrease sleeping time.) 食べる量を減らしたい。 食べる量を少なくしたい。 ...


7

Written Japanese contains a syllabary (like an alphabet) called Kana. All of the "letters" in this syllabary, with the exception of the "letter" "N" (ん/ン) end in a vowel. Thus anytime a foreign word ends in a consonant (with the exception of "N"), it is natural for a Japanese speaker to pronounce this consonant with a vowel after it. This is not a question ...


7

I really like Sawa's "しつこいよ". I would say (and happen to say) things like: もういい I've had enough of this おはしが上手だって当たり前だよ。あんた、フォーク使えるのと同じだろう?! Of course I can use chopsticks! Can't you use a fork? 外国に行ったら、それぐらいみんなできるよ。知らないの?ええ?! Didn't you know that every one abroad is capable of that? I can't believe it! どうでもいいから、話変えてくれないか? Great. ...


7

I believe you are making the mistake of attempting to replicate an English pattern in Japanese. As snailboat points out, the idiomatic equivalent is as follows: 泥棒はいつまでたっても泥棒。/三つ子の魂百まで。/性格を変えることはできない。 And if you make this search, http://eow.alc.co.jp/search?q=Once+a+always+a one finds that the nearest Japanese equivalent seems to be: noun ...


7

イギリス sounds like English, but actually イギリス is NOT equivalent to English. According to this web page, イギリス is an import word from Portuguese language. It originally means England, but its meaning has changed in Japan. It doesn't only mean England, but entire land of the UK now. So, イギリス is the equivalent to the UK. イギリス人{じん} is equivalent to British ...


7

If you connect the two sentence like 私は育ちました and 私は日本のことを思っています, you can say 私は日本のことを(いつも or 常に)思いながら育ちました. You can use "~ながら", it means "with" and "while".


6

The way that I would say it is: [負]{ま}けたくないんです。(maketakunain desu) I'd be especially inclined to say it this way to the teacher of the class in question, as it sounds explanatory and somewhat humble. This roughly translates to "I'd like not to fail" or "I'd rather not fail." The "desu" is a copula verb that makes the sentence a polite one.


6

Here in Japan these days, I actually see and hear 「[vs.]{バーサス}」 as often as or even more often than 「[対]{たい}」. 「対」 would tend to suggest a physical fight or conflict, so we tend not to use it in other contexts.


6

This is not an answer, but I will post it in the hope that it may resolve part of your confusion. I am afraid that you seem to be mixing “shorter” in the sense that it uses less characters and “shorter” in the sense that it uses less area in typical typesetting (hence less pages in typical books, assuming that the size of a page is similar in books in ...


6

「顔」 itself has a metaphorical meaning just as described in that paragraph. One can have more than one face in phrases/sentences like these: 表の顔と裏の顔 (lit. "front face and back face". The face you show to the world, and your inner side.) 彼は別の顔を持っている (lit. "He has another face". He has a secret hobby, or he is famous in two different fields, or he is a ...


6

If you wanted to say it a little more properly: すみませんが、もう一度{いちど}お願{ねが}いします。 This is more explicit; "Sorry but can you please say that again?". I would use this if I couldn't understand one piece of the conversation. or すみません。声{こえ}が/お電話{でんわ}が遠{とお}いようなのですが。 This is a soft or roundabout way of asking the other person to repeat themselves. I usually use ...


6

(I don't know what an Esports team is—e-sports or just sports...?) Anyway, I'd go with 捜索、攻撃、根絶。 Find. Attack. Exterminate. Since all are suru-verbs, I don't think you need any conjugations of する. Alternatively, 捜索、攻撃、駆除 also works, but 駆除 is used for (usually animal) pests and implies that you think of your opponents as "vermin". I think it would ...


6

One option would be 必死すぎ or 必死な人, since 必死 already means that someone is desperate (in this context, for winning). But since some might take 必死 as a compliment, this link suggests 必死すぎて痛い which conveys a negative image. It would roughly translate to "so desperate that it's cringeworthy" (I guess that's what 痛い would mean in this case?)


6

I think a simple one is 一日一歩{いちにちいっぽ} which in romaji is ichinichi ippo. This literally means "one day one step" and it bears the meaning of "one day at the time" in English. There is as well another way to express a similar meaning with 一日一日{いちにちいちにち}を着実{ちゃくじつ}に. In romaji ichinichi ichinichi chakujitsu ni. This is a bit hard to translate literally as ...


5

An alpabet has roughly log(60)~6bits informations and a Kanji has roughly log(3000)~12bits informations. Here we assumed that every character has equal frequency. More acculate estimates would be -Σ((probability of a character X)×log(probabily of a character X) (sum over every character X). If all the character have equal frequency, this sum becomes ...


5

Yes. The word for it is 読み間違える, as you hinted at. Some other words that seem to be more limited to metaphorical instances of reading people or situations include 読{よ}み誤{あやま}る ("misread the political picture" 政治情勢を読み誤る) as well as 見誤{みあやま}る ("misread a signal," or 合図[信号・サイン]を見誤る) These examples and others can be seen here.


5

「[俺]{おれ}が[話]{はな}していた[男]{おとこ}」 indeed can mean the two different things you listed. (Note that this is an equivalent of the English relative clause. It is NOT a "sentence" as you said that it was.) As always, the context will tell you which one of the two it means. With this particular phrase, however, it might take more than just a sentence or two as ...


5

There are several issues with the translation you're suggesting there. Let's start with the English sentence: I am going to sleep tomorrow. The way you've parsed it to translate "going to" is taken to mean the motion verb "to go". But is sleep a place that you are going to? Unless, this is some really poetic English, I think less colloquially what ...


5

Your original text seems to be an instance of a very English way of sentence-building, which adds comments as appositive afterthoughts. This sort of idea is often hard to transplant into Japanese, because the language doesn't have any postmodifing (i.e. adding adjectives after) mechanism. It is often separated or linked by conjunctions, like multiple ...



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