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14

乗り切る doesn't quite fit here because it's about enduring through a hardship. With 乗り切る, wave(s) of difficulties come and go while you persevere, where as in "get over it," you need to overcome it yourself. 乗り越える, 克服する and 打ち勝つ do have the sense of actively overcoming some obstacle, and may work if you use it together with the right noun. I'll come back to ...


10

When you want to translate names, just look for some famous ones in Wikipedia. ハスケル・カリー


10

You are using what could be interpreted as two different verbs: まける -> to lose しっぱいする -> to fail Formally, I usually hear "I cannot afford to fail" rather than "I don't want to fail". 失敗する余裕はありません。 If you want to sound cool, you could say "I don't have any intention on losing". 負けるつもりはありません。


8

I don't think there's a direct translation of "slice of life" into Japanese in the context of Anime genres, however I think 空気系{くうきけい} would be a close candidate. This genre is also sometimes called 日常系{にちじょうけい} (See also the Japanese Wikipedia article for 空気系). It means something like "atmosphere type", and refers to Anime which doesn't have any dramatic ...


7

Written Japanese contains a syllabary (like an alphabet) called Kana. All of the "letters" in this syllabary, with the exception of the "letter" "N" (ん/ン) end in a vowel. Thus anytime a foreign word ends in a consonant (with the exception of "N"), it is natural for a Japanese speaker to pronounce this consonant with a vowel after it. This is not a question ...


7

I believe you are making the mistake of attempting to replicate an English pattern in Japanese. As snailboat points out, the idiomatic equivalent is as follows: 泥棒はいつまでたっても泥棒。/三つ子の魂百まで。/性格を変えることはできない。 And if you make this search, http://eow.alc.co.jp/search?q=Once+a+always+a one finds that the nearest Japanese equivalent seems to be: noun ...


6

I really like Sawa's "しつこいよ". I would say (and happen to say) things like: もういい I've had enough of this おはしが上手だって当たり前だよ。あんた、フォーク使えるのと同じだろう?! Of course I can use chopsticks! Can't you use a fork? 外国に行ったら、それぐらいみんなできるよ。知らないの?ええ?! Didn't you know that every one abroad is capable of that? I can't believe it! どうでもいいから、話変えてくれないか? Great. ...


6

The way that I would say it is: [負]{ま}けたくないんです。(maketakunain desu) I'd be especially inclined to say it this way to the teacher of the class in question, as it sounds explanatory and somewhat humble. This roughly translates to "I'd like not to fail" or "I'd rather not fail." The "desu" is a copula verb that makes the sentence a polite one.


6

This is not an answer, but I will post it in the hope that it may resolve part of your confusion. I am afraid that you seem to be mixing “shorter” in the sense that it uses less characters and “shorter” in the sense that it uses less area in typical typesetting (hence less pages in typical books, assuming that the size of a page is similar in books in ...


6

イギリス sounds like English, but actually イギリス is NOT equivalent to English. According to this web page, イギリス is an import word from Portuguese language. It originally means England, but its meaning has changed in Japan. It doesn't only mean England, but entire land of the UK now. So, イギリス is the equivalent to the UK. イギリス人{じん} is equivalent to British ...


5

Here in Japan these days, I actually see and hear 「[vs.]{バーサス}」 as often as or even more often than 「[対]{たい}」. 「対」 would tend to suggest a physical fight or conflict, so we tend not to use it in other contexts.


5

Yes. The word for it is 読み間違える, as you hinted at. Some other words that seem to be more limited to metaphorical instances of reading people or situations include 読{よ}み誤{あやま}る ("misread the political picture" 政治情勢を読み誤る) as well as 見誤{みあやま}る ("misread a signal," or 合図[信号・サイン]を見誤る) These examples and others can be seen here.


5

An alpabet has roughly log(60)~6bits informations and a Kanji has roughly log(3000)~12bits informations. Here we assumed that every character has equal frequency. More acculate estimates would be -Σ((probability of a character X)×log(probabily of a character X) (sum over every character X). If all the character have equal frequency, this sum becomes ...


5

「[俺]{おれ}が[話]{はな}していた[男]{おとこ}」 indeed can mean the two different things you listed. (Note that this is an equivalent of the English relative clause. It is NOT a "sentence" as you said that it was.) As always, the context will tell you which one of the two it means. With this particular phrase, however, it might take more than just a sentence or two as ...


5

If you wanted to say it a little more properly: すみませんが、もう一度{いちど}お願{ねが}いします。 This is more explicit; "Sorry but can you please say that again?". I would use this if I couldn't understand one piece of the conversation. or すみません。声{こえ}が/お電話{でんわ}が遠{とお}いようなのですが。 This is a soft or roundabout way of asking the other person to repeat themselves. I usually use ...


5

Your original text seems to be an instance of a very English way of sentence-building, which adds comments as appositive afterthoughts. This sort of idea is often hard to transplant into Japanese, because the language doesn't have any postmodifing (i.e. adding adjectives after) mechanism. It is often separated or linked by conjunctions, like multiple ...


5

仕事があるので大学にいます is grammatical but misleading. Without any further context, it sounds as if you were regularly employed by that college, and you had to be at the office of the college because you haven't finished the task for the day. If you are a visitor, and want to say "I was at a university today due to a job," some better ways to say it are: ...


4

The very rough outline of the pattern is as follows: -n -> Nothing added. -t, -d -> Add -o. -s -> A phonemic -u is added, but is often not pronounced. -tch(-ch) -ge -> A phonemic -i is added, but is often not pronounced. -k(-c/-ck), -g, -z, -f, -b, -p, -m, -r, -sh -> Add -u. What I write as -u is really a close back vowel ...


4

This article suggests that one can use 「ごちそうさま」to indicate that one is tired of hearing about a subject. However, I have not been able to verify that it applies to your case; it may only apply when one is bored of hearing the other person brag. I'll try and research some more.


4

There are several issues with the translation you're suggesting there. Let's start with the English sentence: I am going to sleep tomorrow. The way you've parsed it to translate "going to" is taken to mean the motion verb "to go". But is sleep a place that you are going to? Unless, this is some really poetic English, I think less colloquially what ...


4

「[僕]{ぼく}の[人生]{じんせい}が[変]{か}わったのや、[明]{あか}るい[人]{ひと}になったのは、[全部彼]{ぜんぶかれ}のおかげなんだ!」 is grammatical and even sounds fairly natural. The only part that does not quite sound natural is 「明るい人」. We would rarely use 「人」 that way to refer to oneself, but again, it is still all grammatical. You could say 「明るくなった」. Am I using the right particles? Yes, you ...


4

「顔」 itself has a metaphorical meaning just as described in that paragraph. One can have more than one face in phrases/sentences like these: 表の顔と裏の顔 (lit. "front face and back face". The face you show to the world, and your inner side.) 彼は別の顔を持っている (lit. "He has another face". He has a secret hobby, or he is famous in two different fields, or he is a ...


4

立派 is a 形容動詞 or adjectival noun. As 立派 alone, it is a noun essentially meaning "fineness". It needs the な after it to let it modify other nouns such as 大人 to turn it into "fine adult". If you're using Tae Kim's guide, I would suggest you go back a couple sections and check out this page: http://www.guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar/adjectives


4

何もかも is basically a word on its own. It means something along the lines of 'absolutely everything' - it's in effect an intensified version of 何も. Adding that in, the whole sentence becomes something like 'that's a place where absolutely everything becomes ambiguous'. (Though you might want to be careful translating 曖昧, as 'ambiguous' isn't always the best ...


4

It is probably 盗人【ぬすびと】にも三分【さんぶ】の理【り】, which is perhaps better translated as "even a thief has his reasons".


3

Yes, it's used very much like Versus. However! As Tokyo Nagoya pointed out, バーサス is usable sometimes, too. Plus, occasionally クロス (that is, "X", usually a sign of collaboration) will be used like "Versus" depending on the context. For example, it's "Capcom vs. SNK" in both Japan and the US, but it's "Street Fighter X Tekken" in both territories.


3

You can translate inter- and intra- to ~間 and ~内 respectively. (Note that they become suffixes rather than prefixes in Japanese.) References: I read dainichi's comments above; I found this answer on ye olde Bag o' Wisdom; I looked for patterns in the inter- and intra- words in my Kenkyusha J-E dictionary; and I briefly checked Google to see if the ...



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