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11

You have to read the last sentence in the next paragraph to get your specific answer. I borrowed a good letter example from a site with a lot of business templates. First of all, you have to say the addressee's name, career, and you have to say "Sama", and it should be delimited with line breaks and followed by two line breaks (Or maybe carriage returns. ...


9

On the off chance that the information on the referred page is related to the contents of your email, I'll add in ~をご参照【さんしょう】ください meaning "Please refer to..."


8

Yes, it is. Other variants are 追, and direct use of the English P.S. The most common format is 追伸 xxxxxx at the very end of the letter after name and date. When handwriting, it is common to indent further lines to match the start of the text, like so: 追伸 xxxxxxxx (line 1)    xxxxxxxx (line 2) These are more style guidelines than rules as sawa ...


6

I think anything will do for informal emails, but definitely not 拝啓 or 早々 as these are only used in snail mails. Something like どうも or 元気にしてる? would be fine. In a business setting it's much more complicated (I would even say bizarre), and you should check with your colleagues as the format varies between companies or even projects (and some people take ...


5

According to my wife (native Japanese), go with the simple rule of thumb: hiragana for friends ありがとうございました lots of kanji for formal/work emails. 有難う御座いました


5

As you say, 拝啓 and 早々 are too formal for emails. Opening with いつもお世話になっております is appropriate for the emails of requesting something if you belong to the company and write as an employee of the company, but I think it's too formal for an email to friends. I suggest following format: [to name]さん、こんにちは [from name]です。 [contents] よろしくお願いします。 [signature] ...


4

Any clarification as to who exactly 研究者 is? Are they customers? Employees? Trainees? Also who are you addressing the email to? 彼ら is often quite brash to use when emailing your superiors (but this really does depend on them, mine let me get away with all sorts of things). I would stick with 先方 but really if all else fails just call them 研究者 - {Probably ...


4

This decorative frame can be called 飾り罫 (かざりけい). 飾り罫 can be text-based or not, it means any kind of dingbat-style framing in general.


4

ご都合 is an honorific expression, so don't use ご都合 if it refers to the 都合 of yourself. よろしいです sounds like you were higher than the guest. ("よろしいでしょうか" is OK, though) My suggestion: 12月5日(金)13時以降であれば差し支えありません。 12月5日(金)13時以降にお越しいただければ問題ありません。 12月5日(金)13時以降であれば、こちらの都合は大丈夫です。(maybe too verbose)


4

The correct answer is that both お and ご are correct. This is a very rare case. The reason is that in the past 返事 was not always read as へんじ. It was at one time かえりごと. So conforming to the normal pattern you had お[返事]{かえりごと}. However over time it became more and more common for it to be read as へんじ so you had the normal pattern of ご[返事]{へんじ} also. Today ...


3

It depends why you want to know if they received it. (Rhetorically) Do you want to reference the sent email in a follow-up question? Or did the mail contain some kind of data/information (like an account registration, etc.) and you merely want to ensure that it was actually received by someone? It seems that @user1205935 answered the former question in ...


3

This is just an extended comment, but... I think it depends on what you consider a polite way to ask whether someone received an email in English. Usually, pressing for an answer is just not something very polite to do. If you sent an email, I would call them and mention that you sent an email, but would like to ask directly. From the extra effort beyond ...


3

First, we need to make a distinction between 返事 as a noun, and 返事する as a verb 1. When it's a noun, as in お/ご返事をお待ちしております the お or ご create 美化語. 2. When it's a verb, as in お/ご返事いたします (humble, 謙譲語) お/ご返事下さい (respectful, 尊敬語) the お or ご create 謙譲語 or 尊敬語. As for the question of whether to use お or ご, I think it's a matter of personal ...


3

For an opening to a "support" or service email, you can often start off with いつもお世話になっております to affirm your "business" relationship with them (even if you don't really have one).


3

Is it possible to use registered shipping instead? If not, please proceed. EMS(国際スピード郵便)ではなく、国際書留で送っていただくことはできませんか。もし無理なようでしたら、そのまま(1,500円のEMSで)手続きを進めてくださって結構です。


3

There are several ways to say it. Some of the common ways would be 「username@email.comまでメールください。」 「メールはこのアドレスまで(お願いします)。username@email.com」 「メールは下記アドレスまで。username@email.com」 「メールはこちらへどうぞ。username@email.com」 To a friend, you would say 「ここにメールしてね。username@email.com」


3

Don't use さん in a formal email. I think "事務局の加島" means she is probably a clerical staff rather than a teacher. (Of course it's a good idea to check it using Google search) So the safe choice would be to address her as 加島様.


3

Writing as a customer will be much easier than writing in business. You don't have to be too nervous. Using basic 丁寧語 (e.g. 思っています instead of 思っている) will suffice, though extra correct 謙譲語 (like 存じております) may somewhat improve your impression. As for 尊敬語, I don't think you need it. But to add one point, utilizing the word 貴社 (or 御社) will be useful, like 貴社の製品 ...


2

Usually Japanese start or end an email with own name in business whether he is stranger or colleague. for example like this for a potential customer はじめまして、○○社の△△と申します 今回は●●の件でメールをさせていただきました for a colleague △△です。お手数ですが今月分の支払いをお願いいたします C2B 11/8 23:32(Japan time) rewrote △△です。この度は●●社の○○という件についてお伺いしたいことがございます。 B2C ●●社の△△です。この度は弊社製品をご利用していただきましてありがとうございます。 ...


2

You could always try the simple (どうぞ)よろしくお願い致します. The bits around it might change based on context, but at a basic level it's just fine, and I'm pretty sure in most situations it would be there regardless. The verdict seems to be out on the appropriateness of どうぞ. There are sites that say it is acceptable to use it, but user @Rilakkuma has personal ...


1

If you just want to say proceed. 表題の件ですが、承知いたしました。問題ありません。 どうぞよろしくお願い致します


1

Speedy EMS (?) does appear have a registered service: https://www.post.japanpost.jp/whats_new/2011/0307_01.html So you could just ask to be told how much it would cost for registered mail. (You never know the cost provided may already be registered) 本注文ですが、国際スピード郵便(EMS)と国際書留サービスで郵送していただきたいですが、いかがでしょうか? もし可能でしたら、その送料を教えてください。 どうぞよろしくお願い致します


1

Adding to @ジョン's answer which I think it is the most general way, 追記 is possible too. Besides those, they (or I. I'm Japanese) use P.S. PS so normally too.



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