Hot answers tagged

18

Which particles can be omitted from sentences? は, が, and を are often dropped; に sometimes. か, as a sentence-final question particle, can be replaced with intonation. Does the omission of particles make a sentence informal/impolite? Informal yes, but not necessarily impolite. Dropping particles is only for spoken Japanese, so you won't see it in (...


17

お仕事は? Oshigoto wa? is basically short for お仕事は何ですか? Oshigoto wa nan desu ka? あなたは仕事ですか? Anata wa shigoto desu ka? means "Are you work?" and is nonsensical†. は wa (not わ BTW) is the topic marker.* Just asking 〜は basically means "About ~..." and only hints at the actual question. Leaving things unspoken is a very typical thing in Japanese. "About (your) work....


12

をば is basically the particles を + は combined together. It works like を but places extra emphasis on the object (in theory; in practice this "extra emphasis" might be diluted so that it basically just signals formal style). So this sort of をば works like the を in "ご協力を!" (as a complete utterance) -- there is an action implied, but the actual verb is left ...


11

I think it's definition #8 of the 助動詞(auxiliary verb) "た" in デジタル大辞泉: 8 (「…たらどうか」「…たらいかがでしょうか」などの形で)助言したり提案したり勧誘したりする場合に用いられる。「この件は継続審議ということにしたらいかがでしょうか」 [補説]... 仮定形「たら」は、多く「ば」を伴わないで「雨が降ったら中止だ」などと使われ、「遅いからもう帰ったら」のように文末に用いられて8の意を表す。 たら is its 仮定形(hypothetical form). When used at the end of a sentence it indicates a suggestion, recommendation or advice,...


11

Yes. The kind of thing you are talking about is quite common. The verb can be dropped when it is well understood what the assumed action would be. So in your example, it says 「部屋{へや}に」, "to the room". Note that "room" in Japanese often stands in for "apartment", or some understood location. The key is in the particle, に, which indicates an action toward ...


7

Well, since I have no examples to go off of, I'll guess at which type of scenario you're thinking of. It can mean like "But" or "Well (then)" in a kind of defensive sort of way. Usually giving a reason for some action. Like なぜかというと. Ex: お皿{さら}のものはみんな食{た}べなさい → Eat everything on your plate. だってお腹{なか}が一杯{いっぱい}なんだもん → But I'm full!


7

前フリ is technical entertainment jargon for the sentences that are used to set up a joke. For example "hey, the other day, I met a guy at the kombini…" or "two guys of different religion are in a plane…" イベントの前ふりをば would thus represent the necessary words prior to the event itself, so that everyone can enjoy it properly. I guess that "をば" is just a mistake ...


7

をば is a classical particular used for particularly strong emphasis. I'm guessing something like drum roll "And now, setting the stage for our Really Big Shoe, . . ." (edit) - On second thought, Ed Sullivan is maybe a little anachronistic for Classical Japanese. Maybe more like "Forsooth!" or whatnot. 笑


7

I will probably go with "お歳をお聞きしてもいいですか?" if I had to ask the age of some stranger or customer etc. If the other person is a female, I might throw in "大変申し訳ありませんが" before the question. It is considered impolite to ask a female her age in Japan. If you have to ask for whatever reason, you are expected to take extra care. If you are asking an acquaintance,...


7

It doesn't sounds to me like there would be an implied 何 there. I think it means just literally "well then, do you want to become [one]?" Would be easier to say for sure with some context about the conversation, i.e. were they talking about becoming something specific before that.


6

Are there any obvious tricks I'm missing that help me keep track of who is speaking and who they are speaking about? Thanks. ・Pronouns This one's pretty obvious. What pronouns do each character tend to refer to themselves with? What pronouns do they tend to use to refer to certain other characters? ・Gender indicators Besides pronouns, there may be other ...


5

The ては is short for 「~てはどう(ですか)?」, "How about doing ~~?", "Why don't you ~~? ~を買っては? = ~を買ってはどう(ですか)? ≒ ~を買ったら? = ~を買ったらどう(ですか)? The ては in ~~てはどうですか literally means "If~~" (≒~たら). (ては = the conjunctive particle て + the binding particle は). So ~てはどうですか literally means "How is it, if you do~~?" --> "How about doing~~?" It's definition #6 on goo辞書. ...


5

It's not really that で is omitted, but うち is diverted to something like "conjunction" or "preposition" in English. It can lead a full sentence ("sentence (終止形) + うち") or a noun phrase ("NP + のうち") to make an adverbial clause (sentence adverb) that means "in the course of; within". Sometimes, you can reword them using plain noun うち. "adverbial" うち vs. "...


5

It is more polite if you omit or not using straight form when asking personal things. お しごと は  means お しごと は なんですか? And following is not correct あなた は しごと です か which means "Are you a work?"


5

This is an aside, but here is some personal thoughts about チェックいただければ vs チェックしていただければ. チェックしていただければ is undoubtedly correct, and I personally consider チェックいただければ as incorrect. However, I imagine that some (native) speakers use チェックいただければ in an attempt to make the expression more polite than チェックしていただければ. In general, a more polite expression for ~していただければ ...


5

"Anyway, I presume it's about a boy transferring to the school and the teacher introduces him to the class while the main character takes her assigned seat. In other words, I think 席に着くよう指示した is being done by the main character, as the transfer student is getting introduced." No, that is being done by the teacher. The "real" verb in that phrase is 「[指示]{...


5

This has nothing to do with Kansai. 「フォークみたいの」 means 「フォークみたいなもの」= "fork-like thing". The 「の」 is not being used instead of 「を」. Rather, 「を」 is being omitted because of the informality of the speech. You can correctly say 「フォークみたいのを貸してください」 if you want to. You cannot omit the 「の」 because if you do, 「フォークみたい」 cannot be nominalized.


4

だって (at the beginning of a sentence!) is always followed by: reason, pretext (because, ...etc.) opposition (but, ...etc.) So it's not only 'but' or 'like I said'. It's context dependent and it CAN be translated as because. (Context is an emo-schoolgirl-drama.) 山崎くん:スマイルぐらいしてよ。なんでオレともう喋らないの? At least give me a smile. Why don't you talk to me ...


4

As for your last question, please read this question and answer first: Can kanji compounds be formed arbitrarily? This question is about two-kanji compounds (熟語 in the narrow sense), but the answer there is basically true for many cases involving four kanji or more. In fact, most of the "四字熟語" you encounter, like 火力発電 or 愛国精神, are established set phrases, ...


4

What makes something 四字熟語 is not very easy to define. What you are talking really comes down to a concept known as idiomaticity in Linguistics. Having that said, 四字熟語 are generally words used as idioms (i.e. 慣用句). A 慣用句 is an expression that often utilizes more than one unrelated words to mean something completely different. For example, 画竜点睛 means ...


4

You are close. The omitted phrase is その知識が生かせるのではないか, where か is the question marking particle you must know well. It says "Can't I make use of the knowledge? (I can!)" rather than saying "I can't make use of the knowledge". Similarly, 刺さるのでは in that context means 刺さるのではない(だろう)か, meaning "I wonder if it pricks".


3

A verb + a postpositional particle "たら" is used when you suggest something.


3

Both やらなきゃ and やらなくちゃ are colloquial contractions of やらなければ "If does not do". All of the above 3 can be short for やらなければいけない/ならない "have to do" when used sentence-finally, but not when used in an appositive/relative clause.  × やらなきゃこと  × やらなきゃとき There are cases where やらなきゃ and やらなくちゃ happen to be followed by a noun, but in these cases they're ...


3

Translating loosely: Matsusaka steak for me? Dear, don't bother about me. Don't bother shopping for me. Don't bother with Matsusaka beef. おかあさん literally means mother, but oftentimes you'll hear husbands (especially older ones) calling their wives おかあさん. To answer your questions: Yes 私はステーキなんていいから means something like "I don't need things such as ...


2

幾つですか? いくつ is not normally spelled with kanji. Also, this is actually asking, ‘How many?’ To ask for someone's age, you should use the honorific form: おいくつですか。 This is the standard way. 何歳ですか? This is direct, but still in the polite form. 年齢は? This is direct and also informal. I can't imagine many situations where this would be appropriate. ...


2

It should be チェックしていただければと思います。 chekku shite itadakereba to omoimasu and it means "It will be great if you could check (this (for me))" also there is other similar usages with straight forward meaning. 〜していただけると幸いです。 ~ shite itadakeru to saiwai desu. (If you could do this, I will be very good luck) <- not sure this is correct English ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible