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16

お仕事は? Oshigoto wa? is basically short for お仕事は何ですか? Oshigoto wa nan desu ka? あなたは仕事ですか? Anata wa shigoto desu ka? means "Are you work?" and is nonsensical†. は wa (not わ BTW) is the topic marker.* Just asking 〜は basically means "About ~..." and only hints at the actual question. Leaving things unspoken is a very typical thing in Japanese. "About (your) ...


12

をば is basically the particles を + は combined together. It works like を but places extra emphasis on the object (in theory; in practice this "extra emphasis" might be diluted so that it basically just signals formal style). So this sort of をば works like the を in "ご協力を!" (as a complete utterance) -- there is an action implied, but the actual verb is left ...


11

Which particles can be omitted from sentences? は, が, and を are often dropped; に sometimes. か, as a sentence-final question particle, can be replaced with intonation. Does the omission of particles make a sentence informal/impolite? Informal yes, but not necessarily impolite. Dropping particles is only for spoken Japanese, so you won't see it in ...


7

Yes. The kind of thing you are talking about is quite common. The verb can be dropped when it is well understood what the assumed action would be. So in your example, it says 「部屋に」【へやに】, "to the room". Note that "room" in Japanese often stands in for "apartment", or some understood location. The key is in the particle, に, which indicates an action toward ...


7

Well, since I have no examples to go off of, I'll guess at which type of scenario you're thinking of. It can mean like "But" or "Well (then)" in a kind of defensive sort of way. Usually giving a reason for some action. Like なぜかというと. Ex: お皿{さら}のものはみんな食{た}べなさい → Eat everything on your plate. だってお腹{なか}が一杯{いっぱい}なんだもん → But I'm full!


7

をば is a classical particular used for particularly strong emphasis. I'm guessing something like drum roll "And now, setting the stage for our Really Big Shoe, . . ." (edit) - On second thought, Ed Sullivan is maybe a little anachronistic for Classical Japanese. Maybe more like "Forsooth!" or whatnot. 笑


6

前フリ is technical entertainment jargon for the sentences that are used to set up a joke. For example "hey, the other day, I met a guy at the kombini…" or "two guys of different religion are in a plane…" イベントの前ふりをば would thus represent the necessary words prior to the event itself, so that everyone can enjoy it properly. I guess that "をば" is just a mistake ...


5

It is more polite if you omit or not using straight form when asking personal things. お しごと は  means お しごと は なんですか? And following is not correct あなた は しごと です か which means "Are you a work?"


5

This is an aside, but here is some personal thoughts about チェックいただければ vs チェックしていただければ. チェックしていただければ is undoubtedly correct, and I personally consider チェックいただければ as incorrect. However, I imagine that some (native) speakers use チェックいただければ in an attempt to make the expression more polite than チェックしていただければ. In general, a more polite expression for ~していただければ ...


4

I will probably go with "お歳をお聞きしてもいいですか?" if I had to ask the age of some stranger or customer etc. If the other person is a female, I might throw in "大変申し訳ありませんが" before the question. It is considered impolite to ask a female her age in Japan. If you have to ask for whatever reason, you are expected to take extra care. If you are asking an ...


3

だって (at the beginning of a sentence!) is always followed by: reason, pretext (because, ...etc.) opposition (but, ...etc.) So it's not only 'but' or 'like I said'. It's context dependent and it CAN be translated as because. (Context is an emo-schoolgirl-drama.) 山崎くん:スマイルぐらいしてよ。なんでオレともう喋らないの? At least give me a smile. Why don't you talk to me ...


3

幾つですか? いくつ is not normally spelled with kanji. Also, this is actually asking, ‘How many?’ To ask for someone's age, you should use the honorific form: おいくつですか。 This is the standard way. 何歳ですか? This is direct, but still in the polite form. 年齢は? This is direct and also informal. I can't imagine many situations where this would be appropriate. ...


2

「から」 used to indicate a cause or reason must follow a verb or adjective. 「だ」 is the copula 「である」, which binds the noun it follows with the causative particle「で」 and the existence/possession verb 「ある」 in order to turn the noun into a verb clause.


2

It should be チェックしていただければと思います。 chekku shite itadakereba to omoimasu and it means "It will be great if you could check (this (for me))" also there is other similar usages with straight forward meaning. 〜していただけると幸いです。 ~ shite itadakeru to saiwai desu. (If you could do this, I will be very good luck) <- not sure this is correct English ...


1

Yes, you're interpreting the sentence correctly. My understanding is that this is possible because there is the "question word" of どこ in there, which makes the か(知らない) reading possible.



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