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23

Atashi is for females. Chicchai can be seen as more emphatic "tiny". They are both quite common. Remember that in most textbooks for any language the most ideal form of the language (often judged so by prescriptive grammarians) is taught. As you familiarize yourself with real world usage (through travel, friends, and media) you will discover all sorts of ...


8

I think it comes from 撮影【さつえい】 where つ becomes ちゅ for some reason (slang?). A bit like おやちゅみなさい. Seems to me that さちゅえい refers to 撮影会 events. There are many types of 撮影会 but the main ones are for amateur photographers to meet, to take a picture with a character or model, to create publicity with an open photoshoot, or to recruit new models. They are ...


7

Changing the consonant 's' (or 'sh' derived from it) into 'p' is sort of a diminutive. It gives the impression of cuteness/childishness. So the original form is おもしろかった. An English equivalent would be saying doggie for 'dog', etc. These forms are not at all the standard way of talking. A famous example is what came to be called ノリピー語 'Noripii-ish' in the ...


6

あたし (atashi) is the female version of 私 for referring to yourself. わたし (watashi) is the neutral form for that, so you can use it always. あたし is only used by females, while 僕 (ぼく, boku) one of multiple possibilities for males is (although 僕 by itself is rather informal). There are many words that are dependent on who it says, or who it is addressed. あたし is ...


6

Yes, they're common, but those words in particular are very casual and あたし is only used by girls. Many women will not use it since it's so effeminate, but it's not uncommon.


4

Yes, it's most likely a coincidence. We can see this by comparing several titles:  さま  ちゃま  さん  ちゃん The formal さま, which is clearly Japanese, was shortened to さん, which is now the most common and general title, and is more or less unmarked. さん was further reduced to the hypocoristic ちゃん, which is also very common, though not quite as much; and there is ...


3

I am not a native, but I would make two guesses as to why it sounds funny: 1) It could be because ちゃん expresses that the speaker finds that person endearing. Since お侍 is a position that holds superiority, the use of ちゃん now becomes condescending and rude. 2) The other reason I can think of, is that in japanese the combination of お and ちゃん that I have seen ...


3

Only girls would use this kind of language, especially high school girls. If adults use it, it wouldn't sound right. You definatley couldn't use it within a business! I think they use this kind of language to be kinda cute. If you're learning the language, you should of course learn the proper words and maybe just look at these kind of feminisms to be ...


2

German and Japanese similarities here are purely coincidental. Japanese -chan derives as likely baby-talk from regular suffix -san. Similarly, we have regular -sama (which itself is the source of -san) and baby-ish -chama. See also most any JA-JA dead-tree dictionary, or the Daijirin entry here (see the third entry down), clearly stating: 〔「さん」の転〕 ...



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