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14

You will want: No romaji. Romaji hurts your pronunciation and is a crutch. Get something with furigana, or even better, hiragana in parentheses. Lots of example sentences. Context is invaluable in learning new words. Electronic is better. It's faster and can be used mid conversation much more easily. Plus you can write in unknown characters with a stylus. ...


11

I think that the お and ご prefixes are included when the resulting word has been lexicalized and is no longer simply a combination of the prefix and the bare word. For example, I see entries for おやすみ, おにぎり and ごはん in 大辞林. I think these words were originally combinations of お and ご with 休み, 握り, and 飯(はん), but the combinations became words in their own right, ...


10

Am I going in the right direction with this interpretation? You got it, friend! 大辞林曰く、 【 】の中【なか】の漢字【かんじ】が「常用【じょうよう】漢字【かんじ】表【ひょう】」にないものには「 ▼ 」、その漢字が「常用漢字表」にはあるが見出【みだ】しに相当【そうとう】する音訓【おんくん】が示【しめ】されていないものには「 ▽ 」を漢字の右肩【みぎかた】に付【ふ】した。 If a given kanji isn't part of the 常用漢字 list, it'll be marked with a ▼. If it is part of the 常用漢字 list but uses a non-...


9

It's strange that no one mentioned that WWWJDIC provides the audio clips for the reading for all the entries (rintaun only mentioned about the pronunciation hiragana). In case anyone misses it (I didn't realize the blue button is a play sound button until later), here is where:


9

Historically, all of these are indeed the same word, which had a base meaning of "clearing an obstruction". From this base meaning you can easily get to "making/getting empty" and "opening". As for the meaning of "brightening", if I understand correctly, the story goes like this: Since ancient time had a metaphor of dawn (夜明け) as the night (夜) clearing up (...


9

Well, this is the first time I've heard of SKIP. But according to this wiki article, I think it is a mistake. 古 has 5 strokes and 月 has 4, so the SKIP for 胡 should be 1-5-4. The stroke order listed in the link given by jkerian in the comment can also confirm this.


8

▼ is for kanji that don't appear at all on the 常用漢字表. ▽ is when the kanji appears on the chart, but the word uses a reading the chart does not include. Their example of 雄叫び marks 叫 this way because the official chart only includes the readings キョウ and さけぶ for that kanji. The 付表 referred to is part of the 常用漢字表 as well (see page 154 of the PDF linked above)...


8

As mentioned by Earthliŋ, these are indices in the Classic Nelson kanji dictioary. A quick search tells us that N5114 corresponds to the index N6610 in the New Nelson dictionary. Here's an image from my New Nelson dictionary. N5116 presumably corresponds to N6612 then. When I look for pages that mention this, it looks like they're using outdated versions ...


7

EDICT (which is the corpus JquickTrans apparently uses) has several special dictionaries for technical terms. The "Computing/Telecomms" dictionary includes such wonderful words as: 変数設定 【へんすうせってい】 (n) variable initialization 参照渡し 【さんしょうわたし】 (n) call by reference オブジェクト[指向]{しこう}プログラミング (n) object-oriented programming


7

漢和辞典 is what you want: Shinchosha have just released a Kanji-only dictionary called: Shin'Nihongo Kanji Jiten: http://www.shinchosha.co.jp/jiten/kanjijiten/index.html that includes not only words with origins in China, but also native Japanese words that happen to be scripted in Kanji.


7

The さま in these definitions is none other than 様. 様 in this sense is synonymous with 有【あり】様 or 様子, meaning "state, circumstances, situation, appearance, condition". So the definition of 細やか you provided would translate as "shape/scope not being grandiose or exaggerated, but being (a) reserved/moderate/conservative (state)".


7

I don't exactly know what you mean by "translations", but kanji have different readings, on'yomi readings (which are adapted from the original Chinese) and kun'yomi readings (which have nothing to do with the Chinese reading, but map a native Japanese word to a kanji). To distinguish the "type" (on'yomi vs. kun'yomi) of these readings, the on'yomi is ...


7

For this sort of question, you should check the 凡例 of the dictionary. The Wisdom E-J defines 話 and 書 like this:  〔話〕   (話し言葉(spoken))  〔書〕   (書き言葉(written)) The Wisdom J-E defines them like this:  〔話〕   口語  〔書〕   改まった語,文語 But I think the abbreviations must still come from 話し言葉 and 書き言葉, in any case. So in this case, I think 書 is a dictionary-...


6

yeah it's a word. 食べたい and 食べます are considered forms of 食べる, which is the only one that will have an explicit entry in a dictionary. you're fine. the たい forms are built from the "masu" stem of the verb (Vmasu) by taking off the ます and adding たい. my answer to (1) should answer this too. the たい words are conjugations of verbs such as 食べる. the definition you ...


6

There is certainly some overlap, but there is a difference. In general, 誤解 is to misunderstand, whereas 勘違い is often about misreading or misremembering. So 誤解 can sometimes be deeply entangled and hard to fix, while many 勘違い are simple “Oops!” type mistakes that are obvious in hindsight. The “misremembering” kind of 勘違い is never called a 誤解. For example, ...


6

I think that N5116 is a dictionary index for the "Classic Nelson", i.e. The Original Modern Reader's Japanese–English Character Dictionary: Classic Edition by Andrew Nelson, so that N5116 means "character 5116 in the Classic Nelson". The actual kanji 響 seems to be 5114 in this dictionary (i.e. N5114 in the notation used above) and I'm guessing that N5116 is ...


5

It is a little bit informal, but the language site that I always use to look up some word in Japanese is alc.co.jp It uses the Eijiro dictionary, and has pretty good coverage on many subjects. Hope this helps.


5

This is simply a notation of the dictionary used. It doesn't say so explicitly on the results page, but the dictionary for the entry you linked is the デイリーコンサイス国語辞典 第三版. An overview of the notation used by this dictionary can be found here. Particularly, it says this about the dash: - 類似の表現の記述が連続する場合,‐と( )を組み合わせて, 下に示すように, 記述を合併して示した.   例 …する‐こと(人)...


5

To the best of my knowledge, and the knowledge of the dictionary's creator, the first Japanese-English dictionary is the one published by by James Curtis Hepburn in 1867. Hepburn was a physician and Protestant missionary in Japan, and you may recognize his name from Hepburn Romanization. In the preface to the dictionary, Hepburn notes that he is responsible ...


4

Pretty much every online Japanese dictionary that I know of provides reading, unless you mean something out of the ordinary by "reading." Take the following entry from WWWJDIC for reference: 結論 【けつろん】 (n,vs,adj-no) conclusion; (P) Edit: WWWJDIC also contains audio examples for many common words, as Lukman points out in his answer.


4

Books: Basic Technical Japanese by Edward Daub, et.al Intermediate Technical Japanese Search for "Technical Japanese Series" on amazon or google. There are books that cover specific science/engineering areas.


4

http://www.csse.monash.edu.au/~jwb/cgi-bin/wwwjdic.cgi?1C has many dictionaries, including some scientific ones. But you asked for print media... Computer Terms - English-Japanese / Japanese-English Dictionary of Computer and Data-Processing Terms Chemical & Science - Japanese-English Chemical Dictionary: Including a Guide to Japanese Patents and ...


4

My understanding was that while they all have the same reading, they are in fact completely different words. Which the 3 definitions that you have mentioned Dave being in line with how I would use and have seen these kanji being used in Japan. So to answer your question, i think the Edict is incorrect. Looking at some of the other comments it seems that ...


4

I use http://nihongoresources.com which includes a lot grammar and pronunciation as well as a dictionary.


4

UmaiKanji has an audio library. It doesn't have anywhere near as many words as a dictionary, so don't expect to get a result for every word you look up. It's not a dictionary actually, but with Rikaikun/chan its useful. I've seen dictionaries on the iPhone that use software to synthesize the readings. Apple and Microsoft do this decently (for words more ...


4

There are a couple things to keep in mind when looking for a dictionary: How easy is it to find what I am looking for? A given dictionary might prove to cover every single word in the Japanese language, but if you can't find what you are looking for then you will think it is just a waste of money. Your best bet here is to look for ones that are used by ...


4

Your Amazon links get mangled by SE, so I cannot really check what is in your rejected options (since the link below is the most obvious one, I wouldn't be too surprised if it is), but just in case: The ever reliable Japanese resource page maintained by Jim Breen offers two datasets compiled from news archive: In 1998 Alexandre Girardi produced a word-...


4

Hiragana are used for native Japanese words, but also very commonly for kanji, even for onyomi. Readings of kanji can be split up into 3 broad types: On'yomi These are readings taken from the Chinese mainland when kanji were imported to Japan. The reason why there are so many is that kanji sometimes took readings of chinese characters from different ...


4

There is an official document that covers a number of these. For example: つくる 084 【作る】こしらえる。米を作る。規則を作る。新記録を作る。計画を作る。詩を作る。笑顔を作る。 会社を作る。機会を作る。組織を作る。 【造る】大きなものをこしらえる。醸造する。 船を造る。庭園を造る。宅地を造る。道路を造る。数寄屋造りの家。酒を造る。 【創る*】独創性のあるものを生み出す。 新しい文化を創(作)る。画期的な商品を創(作)り出す。 * 一般的には「創る」の代わりに「作る」と表記しても差し支えないが,事柄の「独創性」を 明確に示したい場合には,「創る」を用いる。 Or this, which is ...



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