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13

You will want: No romaji. Romaji hurts your pronunciation and is a crutch. Get something with furigana, or even better, hiragana in parentheses. Lots of example sentences. Context is invaluable in learning new words. Electronic is better. It's faster and can be used mid conversation much more easily. Plus you can write in unknown characters with a stylus. ...


13

It's no big deal, just that the most common standard handwritten form of the character is different from the most common printed form of the character. This doesn't even rise to the level of "variant character" in the strictest sense (like 悪 vs 惡). The two are the same character, just like a joined-up printed さ is the same as a disjoint handwritten one, or a ...


11

I think that the お and ご prefixes are included when the resulting word has been lexicalized and is no longer simply a combination of the prefix and the bare word. For example, I see entries for おやすみ, おにぎり and ごはん in 大辞林. I think these words were originally combinations of お and ご with 休み, 握り, and 飯(はん), but the combinations became words in their own right, ...


9

Well, this is the first time I've heard of SKIP. But according to this wiki article, I think it is a mistake. 古 has 5 strokes and 月 has 4, so the SKIP for 胡 should be 1-5-4. The stroke order listed in the link given by jkerian in the comment can also confirm this.


8

▼ is for kanji that don't appear at all on the 常用漢字表. ▽ is when the kanji appears on the chart, but the word uses a reading the chart does not include. Their example of 雄叫び marks 叫 this way because the official chart only includes the readings キョウ and さけぶ for that kanji. The 付表 referred to is part of the 常用漢字表 as well (see page 154 of the PDF linked ...


8

Historically, all of these are indeed the same word, which had a base meaning of "clearing an obstruction". From this base meaning you can easily get to "making/getting empty" and "opening". As for the meaning of "brightening", if I understand correctly, the story goes like this: Since ancient time had a metaphor of dawn (夜明け) as the night (夜) clearing up ...


7

漢和辞典 is what you want: Shinchosha have just released a Kanji-only dictionary called: Shin'Nihongo Kanji Jiten: http://www.shinchosha.co.jp/jiten/kanjijiten/index.html that includes not only words with origins in China, but also native Japanese words that happen to be scripted in Kanji.


7

EDICT (which is the corpus JquickTrans apparently uses) has several special dictionaries for technical terms. The "Computing/Telecomms" dictionary includes such wonderful words as: 変数設定 【へんすうせってい】 (n) variable initialization 参照渡し 【さんしょうわたし】 (n) call by reference オブジェクト[指向]{しこう}プログラミング (n) object-oriented programming


6

It's nothing to worry about, I would go as far to say that it's not even a different "radical". (How can it be? It's the same Kanji.) Just like in English, things get, shall we say, "corrupted" in hand writing. Nothing is ever as neat and pretty as the pixels on a finely crafted character. Fortunately, this is an easier one to remember. Ignore my awful ...


5

yeah it's a word. 食べたい and 食べます are considered forms of 食べる, which is the only one that will have an explicit entry in a dictionary. you're fine. the たい forms are built from the "masu" stem of the verb (Vmasu) by taking off the ます and adding たい. my answer to (1) should answer this too. the たい words are conjugations of verbs such as 食べる. the definition you ...


3

Don't panic. They're variant forms of the same character. You will encounter others. Chinese characters are very old, and have evolved in a variety of ways, including scriveners' errors, simplification, vulgarization, invention, etc., etc., etc. Fortunately, unless you're reading pre-war texts, most variations in use now are pretty easy to remember.


3

http://www.csse.monash.edu.au/~jwb/cgi-bin/wwwjdic.cgi?1C has many dictionaries, including some scientific ones. But you asked for print media... Computer Terms - English-Japanese / Japanese-English Dictionary of Computer and Data-Processing Terms Chemical & Science - Japanese-English Chemical Dictionary: Including a Guide to Japanese Patents and ...


3

I have been using JquickTrans dictionary software for years (had to pay $15 before but it's freeware now), and it has a few specialized dictionary catalogs that could be useful to find science and math terms:


3

There are a couple things to keep in mind when looking for a dictionary: How easy is it to find what I am looking for? A given dictionary might prove to cover every single word in the Japanese language, but if you can't find what you are looking for then you will think it is just a waste of money. Your best bet here is to look for ones that are used by ...


3

My understanding was that while they all have the same reading, they are in fact completely different words. Which the 3 definitions that you have mentioned Dave being in line with how I would use and have seen these kanji being used in Japan. So to answer your question, i think the Edict is incorrect. Looking at some of the other comments it seems that ...


3

Your Amazon links get mangled by SE, so I cannot really check what is in your rejected options (since the link below is the most obvious one, I wouldn't be too surprised if it is), but just in case: The ever reliable Japanese resource page maintained by Jim Breen offers two datasets compiled from news archive: In 1998 Alexandre Girardi produced a ...


3

The three annually revisited books: 現代用語の基礎知識, イミダス, and 知恵蔵 are particularly famous for studying the trendy words with definition/explanation. They seem to be putting things online, but some are not free. I found this one, which seems to be free. You may want to follow the 'アクセスランキング' link on it. For your purpose, a search with '現代用語' will give you good ...


2

It's not exactly what you were looking for, but would something like this be satisfactory? http://www.manythings.org/japanese/news/ Has an online quiz/flashcard Flash app for the most frequent words taken from a newspaper. As for the words themselves, you can get the frequency list and his steps for compiling it on the quiz about page (if you want to take ...


2

I have kept a couple of these links exactly for that purpose too. Link 1: http://www.offbeatband.com/page/2/#post-290 This one is based on novels. Link 2: http://corpus.leeds.ac.uk/frqc/internet-jp.num I have no idea what the tokens mean, I mean I used to know what they mean but I can't recall anyway they list the top 15k, i'd guess that's all that ...


2

It’s just differences in font/handwriting. But as a side note, I've always written the version in the top-right of your screenshot, that's just how I was taught for Chinese. See also nciku's Chinese dictionary entry for the character.


2

The さま in these definitions is none other than 様. 様 in this sense is synonymous with 有【あり】様 or 様子, meaning "state, circumstances, situation, appearance, condition". So the definition of 細やか you provided would translate as "shape/scope not being grandiose or exaggerated, but being (a) reserved/moderate/conservative (state)".


1

I've seen such dictionaries in my university, but looking something up in such a dictionary just takes a long time. I don't know about electrical engineering, but for maths, there are online dictionaries (like this one). Personally, I have found it much more useful to read a basic textbook for which I can easily follow the academic material so that you can ...


1

The screenshots below are from some font website. They show the character "S", as used in the word "Script". However, the character in the pictures are entirely different to one another! I have seen even more variations! Why is this? Which one is correct? Or are they all correct?



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