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5

「いうないっ」 is a form of negative imperative, the dictionary form of which would be 「いうな」. It sounds masculine and very informal. You could call 「いうないっ」 dialectal because it is not used all over Japan. You will hear it around Tokyo for sure, but not really in Western Japan to my knowledge. We certainly do not say it around Nagoya, which is right in the ...


5

「なりたかねえ」=「なりたくはない」 The former is an informal and mostly-masculine way of saying the latter (dictionary form) around Tokyo. One might safely call it the "tough guy speech". Guys just talk like that around Tokyo when they hang around with close friends. Calling this kind of speech old or outdated is sheer nonsense. It is 100% current. I have lived in ...


1

I'm a native Japanese speaker. I can't post a comment to another writing thanks to a lack of reputation, so I will write here. In my opinion, なりたかねえ is "oral expression" rather than "tough guy like", and it is sometimes used even now. Actually I think sophisticated lady never uses this expression, but I know some girl in a very famous anime often uses almost ...


-3

It looks like very old Japanese, but you are correct it is this 「なりたくない」 Loosely translated. せんべいになりたかねえやつあ おとなしくわきへ どいてろっ。 Be good and get out of the way if you don't want to get flattened. EDIT: To clarify in regards to the comment that this dialect/expression is a current one. This type of dialect was once very much widely used, specifically ...


10

In some dialects spoken in the western part of Japan, you can elongate the last vowel of the masu-form to make an imperative form: 歩きい。 (dialect) = 歩け。 Walk. 見い。 (dialect) = 見ろ。 Watch. [待ちい]{LHL}。 (dialect) = [待て]{HL}。 Wait. [食べえ]{LHL}。 (dialect) = [食べろ]{LHL}。 Eat. (From my personal experience, I feel this is mainly used in Chugoku/Shikoku ...


1

Just to add to Brandon's answer, 「あんさんたち」is rarely used by the younger generation these days. In my line of work I hear it every now and again, but only ever said by the older generation.


3

Pretty simple transformation into standard Japanese; you were on the right track: 待ちなさい、あなたたち。



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