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8

The ん negative ending is a contraction of sorts of classical negative ending ぬ, precursor to modern ない. It's still pretty common. As illustration of this, the Microsoft IME gives 食べん as a valid conversion option after typing in taben, or 飲まん for noman. Note that する with the negative ん is not しん, but instead せん, as again the negative ん is from classical ぬ, ...


8

「おやすも」 is used only by some residents of the region named インターネット. It is not used in Tokyo or Nagoya, I promise.


7

I think うち is a neutral and common feminine first-person pronoun, at least in part of Kansai region. There, people who use うち use it because everyone else uses it. As long as it is used with fluent Kansai-ben in an informal setting, I would feel nothing special about うち. Wikipedia says うち is used also by male people in certain regions in Kyushu, but I have ...


5

豆腐よう isn't so much a special kind of tofu, it's a dish made from tofu by adding a bunch of stuff (including 泡盛) and letting it grow a special mold. 島豆腐 and ジーマーミ豆腐 are special kinds of Okinawan tofu. :-) 豆腐よう is the Okinawan version of the Chinese dish 腐乳 that you can get at pretty much any Chinese supermarket. Wikipedia says it came to Okinawa from the ...


5

It would be「カリーサビラ」 or 「カリー」 for short. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XFyBfvjgpxk http://hougen.ajima.jp/hougen.php?lid=420


5

You are not imagining things. (The tougher) Kansai male speakers do say 「~~~じゃい!」 in colloquial speech. Only the 「い」part is a particle -- an emphatic sentence or phrase ender. And じゃ = だ. The Standard counterpart would be だよ or だい. The Kanto countepart would be だい or でぇ.


4

Looks like it's a Western Kanto thing. http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/西関東方言#.E6.96.87.E6.B3.95 千葉県・埼玉県・群馬県・東京都多摩西部などで「こない」を「きない」や「きねー」と言ったりする。


4

そういえば… When I was in Shikoku island, I remember some people used 「きない」, but that meant 「きなさい」 or 「きてください」, not 「こない」. はよう、こっち、きない! (= はやく こちらに きなさい) Seemingly this is used in Fukuoka and Oita, too. I personally haven't heard きない which means こない, but I'm not familiar with dialects in Kanto region. No impression is my impression of that word.


4

According to here and here, this is common in [茨城]{いばらき} and [群馬]{ぐんま}. Also appearing in Saitama and Chiba. These were the top two links googling in きない 来ない...


2

ばえる means 騒ぐ in 鳥取弁, the dialect of Tottori. けん is mostly used in the 九州 area and some parts of 四国 and can mean a range of things. I am most familiar with から and some kinds of よ: から 今日は寒いけん、コートを着た方がいいよ 今日は寒いから、コートを着た方がいいよ よ お茶いれたけん お茶いれたよ Or いや、昨日めちゃめちゃ面白かったんだよな〜 いや、昨日めちゃおもろかったけんな〜


2

I think ~~たるけんね is Kyushu dialect for ~~てあげるからね(for a desired action) or ~~てやるからな(for a desired or an undesired action; can have a vicious tone). Here I think it's the latter. I don't know if it's Hakata-ben, Kumamoto-ben or another but this page (博多弁ば教えちゃる!) states: 博:よかよか!試合中に教えたるけん。 (いいよいいよ!試合中に教えてあげるから)


1

It is 〜ない being shortened to 〜ん, but only under certain circumstances. Specifically, it's in cases where Type I verbs ending in 〜る use the 〜ない form. For example: 分からない -> 分からん 知らない -> 知らん 蘇らない【よみがえらない】 -> 蘇らん Also related to this is 〜aんない, which is more of a simple slurring wherein ら gets dropped. For example: 分からない -> 分かんない 知らない -> 知んない 蘇らない -> ...


1

I conjecture it is from ぬ <- の. Why? Okinawan actually has a regular sound change ぬ -> ん. For example, 犬{いぬ} -> いん. So I presume that somehow the regular sound changes got applied twice, and you get ん <- ぬ <- の.



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