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12

Yes, it must be, because it appears (or has appeared) in various inflected forms such as あかへん. There are multiple theories about where exactly it comes from, but according to 日本国語大辞典 it's derived from らち(埒)があかぬ: 「らち(埒)があかぬ」の上を略した表現「あかぬ」の変化した語 Martin's Reference Grammar of Japanese (1975) is slightly dated but has some interesting discussion on page ...


10

Like @himself noted, it does mean 葉人をつかまえたんだな. While some dialects do have this change, more importantly it's used to characterise the speaker as a stereotypical wise old male (usually in anime or otherwise in a fiction).


8

取っ付き (or 取り付き) means "starter", "first (step/impression)", "clue" etc. 大辞林 defines 取っ付き like this: とっつき【取っ付き】 ①物事のやり始め。初手。 「-から失敗する」 ②初めて会った時に受ける感じ。第一印象。 「-の悪い男だ」 ③ある建物・場所などに入る時,一番初めに通る所。一番手前。入り口。「-の部屋」「正門を這入ると,-の大通りの左右に植ゑてある銀杏の並木が眼に付いた/三四郎 漱石」 (FWIW, the third definition seems to be common in middle Japan, but I personally did not know this.) ...


8

Yes, it means すみっこ. They say it's 静岡{しずおか} dialect. Source 1・Source 2


7

This is basically, but certainly not exclusively, Western-Japan speech. 「よう」 = 「よく」 = "well" or "very well" in this context. It can also mean "often". This has nothing to do with 「ように」 or 「ような」, which means "like ~~", "as ~~", etc. 「わからん」 = 「わからない」 = "I don't get it.", "I don't understand.", etc. 「~~なんて」 = "stuff/thing/something like ~~". Think ...


6

じゃ = だ in some dialects. So this is probably 葉人をつかまえたんだな.


6

I see in your e-mail, that you mention 水戸{みと}市. 頑張っペ is 茨城弁{いばらきべん}. っぺ is typically used to replace volitional form よう/おう sounds. It is used on this sign for example: Thus, I would translate your example into 頑張ろう ! Note that using っぺ has other uses, see the wikipedia entry if you feel up to it. The main other use is to make a guess, a conjecture. ...


6

“行きとうない” is the same as “行きたくない” in the standard Japanese. “私はもう行きとうない” means that I don’t want to go anymore. Hope this can help you.


6

Yes we do! :D Here in Kyoto we use both わからん and わからへん. I think Osakan women rather use わからん. As for ならん, I think it's あかん in Kansai. Yes, we Kansai women use it daily, too. We talk like: あかんって。(=だめだって。) あかんやん。 あかんやろ。 (=だめだろう。) 知らん。(=知らない。) 知らんで。(=知らないよ。) 知らんわ。 知らんし。 あらへん。(=ない。) あらへんで。(=ないよ。) いらんわ~。(=要らないわ~。) ありえへん。(=ありえない。) ...


5

Yes, it is unmistakably Kansai. 「こわあてかなわんで」, in Standard Japanese, would be: 「怖{こわ}くて敵{かな}わないよ」. = "I'm scared shitless!" 「敵わない」 = "unbearable", "beyond one's power", "can't do", etc. Remember this word because you will keep encountering it. Moving on.. 「無計画{むけいかく}なことされるの」 「の」=「こと」. It is a nominalizer, nominalizing the verb phrase 「無計画なこと(を)される」. ...


5

It's [一体]{いったい}[何]{なに}を[騒]{さわ}いでいるんだ? or 騒いでいるんですか? "What's the fuss about?" in some regional dialect or the role language for old speakers.


5

There are four main parts to consider: な (the form of the copula before のだ) のだ (which has a wide range of uses and is highly context-dependent) よ (an interactional particle) さ (another interactional particle) The last three are all highly context dependent. But the character ends all of their sentences with them, right? They just pile them all on with ...


3

A very pure and specific dialect is rarely used in manga. Why not? Because the vast majority of readers would not understand it then. (The Tokyo dialect might be the only exception.) The cop's speech looks Touhoku-ish for sure, but if you looked closely, except for the use of 「わらす」 (= わらし), almost all of the dialectal elements used are the voicing of the ...


3

In standard Japanese, it would be the same as saying 「あるのかないのか」. The phrase in question basically means "do you intend to do it or not?"


3

Looks like 「[竈]{かまど}」 to me. It means a "cooking stove" -- the kind where you burn wood. Another reading is 「へっつい」 for the same meaning, but 「かまど」 is far more common.


3

As a main islander, I can assure you that almost no one down here would call a whole ear of corn コーン. We actually use とうもろこし for that 99% of the time . What we call コーン in Honshu are: Corn "kernels" sold canned or frozen, corn as a side dish, corn as a topping on pizza or ramen, etc. I have been to Hokkaido 12-13 times, but my impression is that this is ...


3

俺ァ、ポッポヤだから、身うちのことでなくわけいかんしょ。 is a collapsed/colloquial way of saying: 俺は、ポッポ屋だから、[身内]{みうち}の[事]{こと}で[泣]{な}く[訳]{わけ}に(は)いかないでしょう。 The いかん is 行かん(=行かない), and the いかん in the linked question is [如何]{いかん}. ~わけに(は)いかない means "can't~", "not supposed to~" or "not allowed to~". The しょ at the end is Hokkaido dialect for でしょう (See naruto's comment).


3

In Kansai-ben (or, in Kyoto and Osaka), we say: 〖する〗(do / will do): 「する、言う、くる」 <-- 「する、いう、くる」 「しよる、いいよる、きよる*」 <-- 「する、いう、くる」 +おる/よる 「しはる、いわはる、きはる」 <-- 「する、いう、くる」 +はる (*also pronounced しおる、いいおる、きおる) 〖している〗(is doing / have done): 「してる、言うてる、きてる」 <-- 「している、いっている、きている」 「しとる、いうとる、きとる*」 <-- 「している、いっている、きている」 +おる/よる 「したはる、いうたはる、きたはる」 <-- ...


3

Yes this just means, in standard Japanese, 「例によって例のごとくだ」. And it means the same as 「例によって例のごとしだ」. や is a sentence ending particle used in Kansai. ごとく is the 連用形 of ごとし in old Japanese, and thus (例によって)例のごとく is mainly used adverbially. In your example, it's directly followed by だ/や because 例によって例のごとく is treated as a fixed expression.


2

Yes, one can call it Edo dialect and all of your examples look Edo/Tokyo as well. Today. 「やす」 is no longer used by many in real life around Tokyo. It is more "known" as the honorific sentence-ender in the underworld in fiction. I would need to point out, though, that the auxiliary verb 「やす」 was originally a Kansai phenmenon. It is still used in Kyoto in ...


2

As you noticed, the auxiliary verb よる, used in the form of "連用形+よる", mainly in the western part of Japan, has two different functions. One is よる used to form the progressive form, which corresponds to ~ている in 標準語: 「今、なにしよるん?」「勉強しよるんじゃ。」 (広島弁) ≒ 「今、なんしょーん?」「勉強しょんじゃ。」 (contracted 広島弁) ≒ 「今、何しているの?」「勉強しているんだ。」 (標準語) ≒ "What are you doing now?" ...


2

やっていけるのかな changed to やっていけんのかな and it changed to やってけんのかな. Some contexts are necessary to explain the meaning.


2

Simply put, じゃろ and じゃろう are だろ and だろう, but in another dialect. Other forms include やろ and やろう. If you're wondering how they could all come about, they originally come from であろう. In ancient times, some dialects (including the standard, I believe) pronounced で what would be written as じぇ now, and so their であろう contracted naturally to じゃろう. やろう comes from ...


2

I believe the んじゃな in: 葉人をつかまえたんじゃな Is a localized way to say んだ which in turn is an everyday speech abbreviation of the actual form of のだ where the の carries an explanatory tone of the sentence based on context (i.e. the person is explaining something based on a query from a previous sentence) and the だ represents the positive state of being and in this ...


1

No, there is no such thing as "American nihongo". As the comments have suggested, we can assume this has something to do with "locale" settings, such as date formats (although it's hard to see how writing dates in American would actually help Japanese speakers), and perhaps things like units (where Japanese speakers in America will perforce be using ...


1

Section 1 of the appendix on Japanese phonology in NHK 日本語発音アクセント辞典 suggests that pre-nasalisation of /b/ is found in dialects in what it describes as 東部方言, covering all of Japan east of 石川県 and north of 愛知県, precisely where you observed that the wiki page has ばんば. This should indicate that there's an isogloss somewhere in the region. I have no information ...


1

That's a misconception. In Tohoku dialect, the copula だ doesn't follow verbs and i-adjective. It seems some dialect(s) in Kanto or around there has/have that form. But I'm not sure.


1

My experience with speakers in Kyoto is that they use や most if they're going to use dialectal patterns. 関西 men also, surprisingly to me, use わ fairly regularly. I've never heard どす, but it's possible I just never caught it.



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