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11

Yes, it must be, because it appears (or has appeared) in various inflected forms such as あかへん. There are multiple theories about where exactly it comes from, but according to 日本国語大辞典 it's derived from らち(埒)があかぬ: 「らち(埒)があかぬ」の上を略した表現「あかぬ」の変化した語 Martin's Reference Grammar of Japanese (1975) is slightly dated but has some interesting discussion on page ...


7

Yes, it means すみっこ. They say it's 静岡{しずおか} dialect. Source 1・Source 2


7

This is basically, but certainly not exclusively, Western-Japan speech. 「よう」 = 「よく」 = "well" or "very well" in this context. It can also mean "often". This has nothing to do with 「ように」 or 「ような」, which means "like ~~", "as ~~", etc. 「わからん」 = 「わからない」 = "I don't get it.", "I don't understand.", etc. 「~~なんて」 = "stuff/thing/something like ~~". Think ...


7

I'm not sure due to lack of context, but there's a high likelihood that it's in Kansai-ben/Kansai dialect. What's written is Kansai-ben negation. The Hyojungo/standard version would be あなたも なかなか やるじゃないの〜 Here are some links that should be helpful: List of Hyojungo to Osaka-ben suffix conversions. Please refer to the 8th listing. (in Japanese) ...


6

Nothing is either wrong or dialectal about 「[誘]{さそ}えていないんだ。」. It sounds 100% natural and it would be said all over the country. It is your 「誘いていないんか。」 that is incorrect. There is no such conjugation as 「誘いて」 in standard Japanese. The correct form is 「誘って」 for the plain and 「誘えて」 for the potential. 「[誘]{さそ}えていないんだ。」 means: "(You) have not been ...


6

やるやないの This is a Japanese dialect used mainly the Kansai region (Hyogo, Osaka, etc.). Perhaps you have misunderstood which words are being used in the sentence: ≠ 「やる」 + 「やらない」 ≒ 「やるじゃない(の)」


6

“行きとうない” is the same as “行きたくない” in the standard Japanese. “私はもう行きとうない” means that I don’t want to go anymore. Hope this can help you.


5

Yes we do! :D Here in Kyoto we use both わからん and わからへん. I think Osakan women rather use わからん. As for ならん, I think it's あかん in Kansai. Yes, we Kansai women use it daily, too. We talk like: あかんって。(=だめだって。) あかんやん。 あかんやろ。 (=だめだろう。) 知らん。(=知らない。) 知らんで。(=知らないよ。) 知らんわ。 知らんし。 あらへん。(=ない。) あらへんで。(=ないよ。) いらんわ~。(=要らないわ~。) ありえへん。(=ありえない。) ...


5

Yes, it is unmistakably Kansai. 「こわあてかなわんで」, in Standard Japanese, would be: 「怖{こわ}くて敵{かな}わないよ」. = "I'm scared shitless!" 「敵わない」 = "unbearable", "beyond one's power", "can't do", etc. Remember this word because you will keep encountering it. Moving on.. 「無計画{むけいかく}なことされるの」 「の」=「こと」. It is a nominalizer, nominalizing the verb phrase 「無計画なこと(を)される」. ...


5

It's [一体]{いったい}[何]{なに}を[騒]{さわ}いでいるんだ? or 騒いでいるんですか? "What's the fuss about?" in some regional dialect or the role language for old speakers.


4

"通りゃんせ" is a colloquial contraction of "通りやんせ", which is masu-stem(連用形) of "通る"="通り" with imperative form(命令形) of "やんす"="やんせ". Also, 下しゃんせ is "下す" with "やんす". https://kotobank.jp/word/%E3%82%84%E3%82%93%E3%81%99-650011


4

There are four main parts to consider: な (the form of the copula before のだ) のだ (which has a wide range of uses and is highly context-dependent) よ (an interactional particle) さ (another interactional particle) The last three are all highly context dependent. But the character ends all of their sentences with them, right? They just pile them all on with ...


2

ばえる means 騒ぐ in 鳥取弁, the dialect of Tottori. けん is mostly used in the 九州 area and some parts of 四国 and can mean a range of things. I am most familiar with から and some kinds of よ: から 今日は寒いけん、コートを着た方がいいよ 今日は寒いから、コートを着た方がいいよ よ お茶いれたけん お茶いれたよ Or いや、昨日めちゃめちゃ面白かったんだよな〜 いや、昨日めちゃおもろかったけんな〜


2

As a main islander, I can assure you that almost no one down here would call a whole ear of corn コーン. We actually use とうもろこし for that 99% of the time . What we call コーン in Honshu are: Corn "kernels" sold canned or frozen, corn as a side dish, corn as a topping on pizza or ramen, etc. I have been to Hokkaido 12-13 times, but my impression is that this is ...


2

Yes this just means, in standard Japanese, 「例によって例のごとくだ」. And it means the same as 「例によって例のごとしだ」. や is a sentence ending particle used in Kansai. ごとく is the 連用形 of ごとし in old Japanese, and thus (例によって)例のごとく is mainly used adverbially. In your example, it's directly followed by だ/や because 例によって例のごとく is treated as a fixed expression.


2

Yes, one can call it Edo dialect and all of your examples look Edo/Tokyo as well. Today. 「やす」 is no longer used by many in real life around Tokyo. It is more "known" as the honorific sentence-ender in the underworld in fiction. I would need to point out, though, that the auxiliary verb 「やす」 was originally a Kansai phenmenon. It is still used in Kyoto in ...


1

That's a misconception. In Tohoku dialect, the copula だ doesn't follow verbs and i-adjective. It seems some dialect(s) in Kanto or around there has/have that form. But I'm not sure.


1

My experience with speakers in Kyoto is that they use や most if they're going to use dialectal patterns. 関西 men also, surprisingly to me, use わ fairly regularly. I've never heard どす, but it's possible I just never caught it.



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