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7

It's fairly common for both ai and ae to be slurred to ee in colloquial speech. For example: じゃない → じゃねぇ   janai → janee のみたい → のみてぇ   nomitai → nomitee おまえ  → おめぇ    omae → omee てまえ  → てめぇ    temae → temee Your example has an additional contraction. When a vowel is dropped between r and n, you end up with rn. This isn't pronounceable, so it ...


5

There are a few places where にゃ is used in place of certain constructions, but is it possible that these are just someone trying to be cute? The first one is a contraction of the phrase だるまさんがころんだ, which is a children's game similar to 'red light, green light.' Seems possible that using にゃ is just trying to be childish/cute/catlike in its pronunciation. ...


4

One can hear しょって used often when talking about rucksacks or backpacks. リュックサックを[背負]{しょ}って[歩]{ある}く There isn't really much difference (しょう pronunciation is from せおう anyway), though, and people use them quite interchangeably. Though, sometimes the nuance of しょう can be such that it is [迷惑]{めいわく}... However, there is one situation, when one's talking ...


3

As far as I know, there is no difference, because Japanese is mainly used as a language to talk to people in Japan which is right close by, and to enjoy media and products from Japan. Japanese is still widely studied in Korea for the same reasons. Japanese textbooks in Taiwan seem to demonstrate an eagerness for fluency and avoiding confusion in business ...


3

「わしは~」「~じゃ。」「~(じゃ)ろう。」「~(じゃ)のう。」「~てみい。」etc. are not regional dialect but フィクションにおける老人語. この老人語は江戸時代以来、セリフの約束ごととして、老人や知識人を表現するための役割語として演劇・小説・漫画等に定着したものという。 ...


3

Indeed, みい 見よ・ご覧。「見い」であろう。 which is listed as 高松の方言 (四国). Considering that he also uses じゃが(な) and じゃろう, though, I think it would be better to place his dialect closer to 九州弁. The equivalent in other areas would be みな みなさい。 In any case, both are variations on (~て)みてください.


2

I think ~~たるけんね is Kyushu dialect for ~~てあげるからね(for a desired action) or ~~てやるからな(for a desired or an undesired action; can have a vicious tone). Here I think it's the latter. I don't know if it's Hakata-ben, Kumamoto-ben or another but this page (博多弁ば教えちゃる!) states: 博:よかよか!試合中に教えたるけん。 (いいよいいよ!試合中に教えてあげるから)


2

According to yutaro82さん on this Chiebukuro post, it sounds like this 「〜ちょ」 could possibly be part of 名古屋弁{なごやべん}. Looking at this list of words within 名古屋弁{なごやべん} shows that「ちょう」can translate to the standard Japanese word「ください」. Both of these references don't appear to give an exact reason as to why「ちょう」came to be used to mean「ください」(at least in ...


1

Touhoku dialect? More details here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T%C5%8Dhoku_dialect That being said, unless you're going way off into the boonies, I think if you've got a good understanding of standard Japanese, you'll be fine. Here are some of my informal experiences with different dialects: Only a problem if you're speaking informally, which most ...


1

[I've also just noticed this question has come up before (See: Usage of ~じゃん (~じゃない))but you can read my answers anyway - I am going to check them!] Q1: Does "かわいいに決まってるじゃない" mean the same thing as "かわいいに決まってる," just with more emphasis? A1: Yes (but I see from the previous answer it can often be translated as "Actually") Q2: Is the following ...


1

According to this edit to the Wikipedia article on 名古屋弁, ちょ seems to be a shortened form of ちょうせ (the imperative form of ちょうす, which is the 尊敬語 form of くれる).



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