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17

No, this phrase isn't cognate with Standard Japanese あした. したっけ literally means what in Standard Japanese そうしたら. The demonstrative そう is omitted because the whole context before is considered to stand in place of it (colloquial omission of this そう is also common in Tokyo). The っけ part shares the same origin with Standard っけ ("(what) again?"), that is ...


16

Your two examples are incorrect in the “standard” dialect. Some dialects (such as the Gunma dialect and the Saitama dialect) use ん instead of の in a question as in your first example. The second example may also be used in some dialects.


15

According to an answer to a similar question on Goo's oshiete site: 「さびしい」 is generally used in two ways (roughly equivalent to how the english "lonely" is used): an emotional state of emptiness, isolation, or a feeling of lacking Examples: 「さびしい正月を迎える」「ふところがさびしい」 quiet and empty of people or sounds Example: 「さびしい山道」 These two meanings are ...


13

I have a number of gaijin friends in Tokyo who learned Japanese in Kansai. Rather than being looked down upon, Japanese friends think it's cool (関西人面白いでしょ?). Yet, business is different - again, the relationships of the people involved matter. Unless you're in a Kansai office with a bunch of Kansai-jin, sticking to "標準語 (hyoujungo)" is never a bad idea. ...


13

Sure. Dialects can vary right down to the particles. In Kansai-ben, there is a particle かて which does not appear in standard Japanese. It roughly means 〜ても, でも, さえ etc. In Tohoku-ben, the particle さ is used instead of what in standard Japanese would be に or へ: 東京さ行ぐ, etc. In some Nagano dialects, を is pronounced /wo/, not /o/. In many dialects, including ...


12

My guess is that it's a typo of either しやした or しました. At first glance, た looks pretty hard to mistype as ま, but on second thought, it's likely to happen on mobile phones. Considering that most Japanese mobile phones have keypads like: あかさ たなは まやら it's quite easy to mistype た, ま and や, which are arranged next to each other. しやした can be a ...


12

Mark Hosang already gave a good answer, so I'll only try to add more detail to it, and maybe generalize the dialect division some more. It's hard to answer "how many dialects are commonly used", for two reasons: Dialects are hard to count - you can subdivide dialects (e.g. Kyoto-ben, Osaka-ben, Kobe-ben) or join them into bigger groups (Kansai-ben). Some ...


12

Yes, it must be, because it appears (or has appeared) in various inflected forms such as あかへん. There are multiple theories about where exactly it comes from, but according to 日本国語大辞典 it's derived from らち(埒)があかぬ: 「らち(埒)があかぬ」の上を略した表現「あかぬ」の変化した語 Martin's Reference Grammar of Japanese (1975) is slightly dated but has some interesting discussion on page ...


11

Actually, you've already got the right answer! The verb in question is する, and one of its negative stems (未然形) is せ〜, as in せず, せぬ, and as you've just discovered, せん. The other negative stem of する is the well-known し〜. Note that these are not interchangeable: **せない is ungrammatical, as is **しず. The only verbs that have this extra negative stem are する and ...


11

The ん negative ending is a contraction of sorts of classical negative ending ぬ, precursor to modern ない. It's still pretty common. As illustration of this, the Microsoft IME gives 食べん as a valid conversion option after typing in taben, or 飲まん for noman. Note that する with the negative ん is not しん, but instead せん, as again the negative ん is from classical ぬ, ...


10

This is the result of a well known devoicing rule in Japanese. Devoicing means that there is no vibration of the vocal folds. For example, the difference between [s] and [z] is only that [z] is voiced. The IPA diacritic for devoiced phones is a circle at the bottom of the glyph e.g. [z̥]=[s]. Although there is still much dialectal, idiolectal (the way a ...


10

Like @himself noted, it does mean 葉人をつかまえたんだな. While some dialects do have this change, more importantly it's used to characterise the speaker as a stereotypical wise old male (usually in anime or otherwise in a fiction).


9

I did a search on this and found the following: 昔、TBSの番組「ザ・ベスト10」で久米宏が なに気に 「〜かしら」と言ったのを見て初めは かなり衝撃でしたが アナウンサーの業界では以外と使われている様です。 あと学者や解説者など、有識者や育ちのいい人が 今でも比較的違和感なく使っていますね。 Loose translation: "Back in the days, Kume Hiroshi used it quite frequently in the show "The Best 10". While it may come as a shock to those who first experience it, it's ...


9

As you probably already read in the question on dialects, Yakuzas are often pictured speaking Hiroshima-ben on TV. According to Japanese friends, this has probably as much to do with the fact that Hiroshima-ben naturally sounds quite hard to the ear (whereas soft-spoken Kyoto-ben is the typical dialect choice for cute, feminine characters) as any real-world ...


9

This actually most likely Oosaka-ben's variation of 「や」as「よ」, becoming something like: なんか買ってくれよ! The usage is explained in more detail here: http://www.weblio.jp/content/%E3%82%84?dictCode=OSAKA (Japanese) EDIT The original quote from the just in case site downtime happens: ...


9

Other samples from this character in your manga would be helpful to confirm this, but my guess is that せん is equivalent to しない (and possibly derived from せぬ, see Zhen Lin's comment below). Then, 苦労せん means something like "don't worry" or "don't fret". This is really part of the group of dialects from 'Western Japan'. In particular, [九州弁]{きゅうしゅうべん} uses せんで ...


8

Update: This is not an instance of やい, but rather 速い【はやい】, so the information in my original answer is not actually applicable in this case. Wikipedia suggests that at the very least, this is a feature of Hakata dialect (though it is also likely a feature of other dialects as well, as suggested by my comment above). In Hakata dialect, it is used as a ...


8

The biggest dialects that often come up are. Standard Japanese (Tokyo - What TV announcers speak) Osaka-ben (Manzai and Comedians) Kyoto-ben (Supposedly prettiest female dialect in all of Japan) Okinawa-ben (It's totally out there, and is supposedly the closest to orig. Japanese.) Hiroshima-ben (more so because of Yakuza and their portrayals in movies) ...


8

It really all depends on how you define preservation, and whether you consider the Ryukyuan languages (such as Okinawan) separate languages or dialects of Japanese, since ゑ and ゐ are used in some Ryukyuan spelling systems (other systems use other conventions such as writing these sounds as うぇ and うぃ). There are one or two problems with considering that as a ...


8

Was しもうた ever a part of the standard japanese dialect? Do 昔話 borrow from the other current dialects to create their atmosphere or do they generally only use older Japanese forms? It's hard to generalize about the entire genre, of course, but I think a combination of all of your theories is true. Modern "mukashibanashi" (as opposed to period novels 時代小説 ...


8

I agree with Chocolate: it is not expected, regardless of whether the traveler is a native speaker of Japanese or not. And as a result of doing something unexpected, some people may interpret it as making fun of the local accent, because it seems to be the most plausible explanation why anyone from another area would imitate (probably very poorly) the local ...


8

I feel that speaking a foreign language in an accent other than the 'standard' one is kind of like playing the violin: it sounds really awful from a beginner, but from someone skilled it can sound very nice. I myself lived for two years in the Kanto area and learned to speak 'standard' Japanese. After that I spent a year in Kyoto and though I learned to ...


8

「おやすも」 is used only by some residents of the region named インターネット. It is not used in Tokyo or Nagoya, I promise.


8

I think うち is a neutral and common feminine first-person pronoun, at least in part of Kansai region. There, people who use うち use it because everyone else uses it. As long as it is used with fluent Kansai-ben in an informal setting, I would feel nothing special about うち. Wikipedia says うち is used also by male people in certain regions in Kyushu, but I have ...


8

Yes, it means すみっこ. They say it's 静岡{しずおか} dialect. Source 1・Source 2


8

取っ付き (or 取り付き) means "starter", "first (step/impression)", "clue" etc. 大辞林 defines 取っ付き like this: とっつき【取っ付き】 ①物事のやり始め。初手。 「-から失敗する」 ②初めて会った時に受ける感じ。第一印象。 「-の悪い男だ」 ③ある建物・場所などに入る時,一番初めに通る所。一番手前。入り口。「-の部屋」「正門を這入ると,-の大通りの左右に植ゑてある銀杏の並木が眼に付いた/三四郎 漱石」 (FWIW, the third definition seems to be common in middle Japan, but I personally did not know this.) ...



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