New answers tagged

1

As pointed out in the comments, most 副詞 (adverb) modify verbs (e.g., "run fast", "しばらく眠る"; Adverbs indicated with bold). You don't usually have to use such a term as 動詞修飾副詞 (≒"verb-modifying adverb") when you casually talk about grammar in a site like this. However, some adverbs modify adjectives (e.g., "surprisingly cheap", "とても大きい"). Some adverbs modifies ...


2

Yes and no, I would say. 'Yes', in the sense that the term seems to exist, and 'no', in the sense that it is not a very commonly-used term. In fact, this is probably the first time I have heard the term 「[動詞修飾副詞]{どうししゅうしょくふくし}」. The only reason that the term "feels" kind of familiar despite the fact that I may not have heard it before would be that its ...


1

I'll give you tl;dr for this question. During edo period, "domo" was used to express the feeling of confusion or unsureness about the person who he/she is talking to. "Domo nani mo ienu" is an old way saying "I am very unsure about what to say to you" or "I am very unsure who you are". In 1950s, the usage of domo was considered insincere. In 1960s, Keizo ...


2

The modern day use of どうも as a greetings stems from the Edo period phrase どうも言えぬ, lit. "unable to speak in spite of oneself", used positively much like the way we use the English word "awesome" today. The どうも here was taken from the phrase and was used like すごく or 大変 (which would be translated as "very" or "quite). どうもお久しぶりでございます どうもありがとうございます ...


1

Referencing the top answer here: It seems that its use as a greeting is not exactly "standard Japanese," but rather a relatively new usage popularized by a free-lance announcer by the name of Keizou Takahashi after the second world war. However, you seem to misunderstand the meaning of 「どうも」 overall. Loosely translating the dictionary entry linked in the ...


10

As shown in @choco's comment above, 「[国]{くに}」 in this context means "one's birthplace", "home province", etc. It is mostly used when one is staying far away from where one was born and raised but is still in the same country/nation. When I am in another prefecture, I am sometimes asked 「国はどこ?」,「お国はどちらですか。」, etc. to which I reply 「[名古屋]{なごや}です」. So, ...



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