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16

Yes, 雷 refers to both the lightning and the sound caused by it. If you need to distinguish, the specific term for the visible discharge of the light is 稲妻【いなずま】, and the specific word for the sound is 雷鳴【らいめい】. Although these words often appear in news media and scientific papers, we usually just use 雷 in everyday conversations. As for the last two ...


10

As shown in @choco's comment above, 「[国]{くに}」 in this context means "one's birthplace", "home province", etc. It is mostly used when one is staying far away from where one was born and raised but is still in the same country/nation. When I am in another prefecture, I am sometimes asked 「国はどこ?」,「お国はどちらですか。」, etc. to which I reply 「[名古屋]{なごや}です」. So, ...


9

[長]{なげ}え is a colloquial, masculine and a bit vulgar way of pronouncing [長]{なが}い. (Compare: うるさい→うるせえ, しらない→しらねえ, たべたい→たべてえ) The と in 長いと is a 接続助詞(conjunctive particle), meaning "if~~" or "when~~". So the なげえと(長いと) here means "If (your hair is) long" or "When (your hair is) long". バッサリいこうぜ!うっとうしいだろ長えとよ。(≒長いとうっとうしいだろ。) Let's cut it short. (Because) ...


9

"Beautiful" is surely included in the meaning of 「うららか」, but its more important base meaning is "spring-like" ("printanier" in your language). In the world of haiku, 「うららか」 simply means "spring" itself. A very beautiful day in any other seasons would usually not be described as 「うららか」by native speakers regardless of how beautiful the day is. It just feels ...


7

Both ひとまえ and にんまえ exist. 人前【ひとまえ】:(noun) public place; front of the audience. 人前【にんまえ】: (counter) portion of, often for meal. 1 serving = 1人前【にんまえ】. 人前【じんぜん】(式【しき】) : (noun) A certain irreligious style of wedding, as opposed to Christian-, Shinto-, or Buddhism-style weddings.


6

柄 is an old word; Murasaki Shikibu wrote '人のためしにしつべき人柄なり' 1000 years ago. Today 柄 is used in phrases like お日柄、 人柄、銘柄、柄が悪い、お国柄、お家柄、大柄、小柄. The concept has not changed from the old days. 柄 itself is rather about social stereotype than personal impression. When it comes to 柄にもない, the connotation varies depending on whose 柄 is mentioned. If it was my 柄, it ...


5

雷 refers to both lightning and thunder, though tends to suggest lightning more than thunder if you use it on its own (this would be the image that comes to mind when you say it). 見る, 聞こえる are both valid to use, but should take が and not を, because they're sensory. You can hear a dog (bark), so why wouldn't you be able to hear lightning (crash)? Your two ...


5

It is technically any "accident causing injury or death" however as your question points out it is generally accepted in society that it means that there was a fatal injury. In the event that this is displayed on the monitors it means that the train company had to stop train service (or later service is delayed) to deal with the accident. Anecdotal: A ...


5

蘇生する can be used both transitively and intransitively. Basically it only means resurrecting dead people/animals. 蘇生 is also a medical term for (cardiopulmonary) resuscitation. 死者が灰から蘇生する (intransitive) 死者を灰から蘇生する (transitive) 死者を灰から蘇生させる (intransitive + causative) 蘇る is always intransitive. It can be used with 記憶, 思い出, etc., too. 死者が灰から蘇る 死者を灰から蘇らせる ...


3

The most used word that sounds 'あこ' is '吾子,' which is a very oldish expression meaning "my child" that appears pretty often in old anthologies like 万葉集. When you input 'ako' in MS Word, you get '亜子,' '阿子,' '阿古,' and '阿児' as a conversion. '亜子' is a pretty familiar name of women. But I don't know what the last two words mean, and if they make sense. アコ in ...


3

The latter is correct. When an accident happens, the train company need to stop trains and to let passengers know what is going on right away. Then don't know why the accident happened yet. Technically speaking, it is police that investigate an accident and find out the reason. Right after an accident, often it is apparent to everyone that the victim ...


3

人情【にんじょう】 is a common (and maybe a bit nostalgic) word which refers to (good) human emotion. You can basically think 人情 includes 友情 (friendship), 愛情 (love), and compassion toward others in general. 人性【じんせい】 is very rare at least as a Japanese word, and I don't know how to use this term. Google gives Chinese articles about 人性 in the first page, although I ...


3

I guess you could hear にんまえ in at least three cases (two of which already mentioned in answers and comments, but one still not): a "serving" for meal, in this case it is countable 一人前{いちにんまえ}, 二人前{ににんまえ} and "askable" 何人前{なんにんまえ} a set phrase 一人前{いちにんまえ} meaning "grown", "fully-fledged" like in "一人前{いちにんまえ}になる" meaning "become a man" a set phrase ...


3

It essentially seems to be based on whether the entrance is shared or not. If there is one door per household it is 長屋建. If there is a hall entrance it is a 共同住宅. The number of floors has no relevance, even a one-floor building can be a 共同住宅. From http://www.stat.go.jp/data/kokusei/2010/users-g/word3.htm: 長屋建 ...


3

Yours is, I must say. This sentence would not lend itself to "perfect literal translation" in English because of its structure. Hard as you may try, you will end up needing to make adjustments so that your translation would sound natural in the target language. In your case, you ended up using the passive voice form "are influenced", which is not used in ...


3

Since there isn't enough context to judge exactly in what sense it is used, I guess it was similar to この私が〜します. And I also assume that you wonder why there is この before 私. Here, "Kono watashi ga (この私が)" basically means "I", but it is emphasized. It is also pronounced as "Kono watakushi ga" in more formal way. Ex: もう20歳若ければ、この私が彼女と結婚している: If I was 20 ...


3

In this context, 「ゆとり」 would mean more like "mental affluence" than "time". It would be synonymous to 「心{こころ}のゆとり」, which we also often use. One would, of course, certainly need to have time to obtain mental affluence.


2

I'm a native speaker of Japanese and also am a gamer, and I have to say this sentence is ungrammatical and hard to interpret, unless this おどおど受け (literally "timid reception") has some special meaning in the game you play. It may be some terrible typo, or maybe it was originally an emoji (like these) and then was turned into hiragana for some reason. Even ...


2

This 'そう' is an adverb which is similar to English 'so', or 'like that'. そう思う。 (I) think so. そうする、 (I'll) do so. そう大きくはない。 (It's) not that big. And you can use 'そう' by itself to mean many things, depending on the context and the intonation: そう。 That's it. Yes. Exactly. Good. そう? Is that so? Really? Are you sure? そう。 Oh. Okay. Uh-huh. (not very ...


2

I think it's an error. Never heard it being used to refer to the concept of the marriage. Generally 婚儀 is just an archaic version of 結婚式. Almost always, wedding ceremonies will be called 結婚式. It could be used e.g. if you are referring to the emperor's wedding ceremony etc.


2

へりくだる only means "act humbly, lowering oneself below one really is", so you won't know they do so because they're really humble, or on courtesy, or patronizing, or having other thoughts. As for alc.co.jp, where you find those translations, though they boast of abundance of information, their dictionary is basically made up by collective authorship, which ...


2

The modern day use of どうも as a greetings stems from the Edo period phrase どうも言えぬ, lit. "unable to speak in spite of oneself", used positively much like the way we use the English word "awesome" today. The どうも here was taken from the phrase and was used like すごく or 大変 (which would be translated as "very" or "quite). どうもお久しぶりでございます どうもありがとうございます ...


2

Yes and no, I would say. 'Yes', in the sense that the term seems to exist, and 'no', in the sense that it is not a very commonly-used term. In fact, this is probably the first time I have heard the term 「[動詞修飾副詞]{どうししゅうしょくふくし}」. The only reason that the term "feels" kind of familiar despite the fact that I may not have heard it before would be that its ...


2

あこ as a Japanese girl name, can be displayed in a lot of different Kanji characters, depending on what the parents choose (They're all pronounced the same as AKO). For examples: 亜子、亜來、亜古、亜呼、亜心、亜湖、 亜琥、亜瑚、亜胡、亜香、亜恋 吾子ーー>(These two characters meaning "my child") 和心----> (could mean "harmonious heart") For those above beginning with Kanji "亜", which means ...


2

One way to distinguish is to look at the materials supporting the building's structure: Light structure with either: Timber Prefabricated Light steel beams ... is often アパート. Heavy structure with either: Heavy steel beams Reinforced concrete Steel framed reinforced concrete ... is often マンション. Better/other criteria welcome! Reference: ...


1

Atually, snailboat is correct. After all searching of jargons or whatnot, I came across this thesis. It says, I am sorr to say I can not translate the sentence since it is too techinical for me, OR 菌は, 植物体の表面に分生子を連鎖上に形成します。従来のうどんこ病菌 とは分生子や発芽管の形状, フィブロシン体という器官を欠く点が異なります ( 図1)。 And this site also says, 病原菌はフィブロシン体を有する。表生菌糸上に分生子柄を直立し,分生子を鎖生する ...


1

As pointed out in the comments, most 副詞 (adverb) modify verbs (e.g., "run fast", "しばらく眠る"; Adverbs indicated with bold). You don't usually have to use such a term as 動詞修飾副詞 (≒"verb-modifying adverb") when you casually talk about grammar in a site like this. However, some adverbs modify adjectives (e.g., "surprisingly cheap", "とても大きい"). Some adverbs modifies ...


1

I'll give you tl;dr for this question. During edo period, "domo" was used to express the feeling of confusion or unsureness about the person who he/she is talking to. "Domo nani mo ienu" is an old way saying "I am very unsure about what to say to you" or "I am very unsure who you are". In 1950s, the usage of domo was considered insincere. In 1960s, Keizo ...


1

Referencing the top answer here: It seems that its use as a greeting is not exactly "standard Japanese," but rather a relatively new usage popularized by a free-lance announcer by the name of Keizou Takahashi after the second world war. However, you seem to misunderstand the meaning of 「どうも」 overall. Loosely translating the dictionary entry linked in the ...


1

I'd translate 同然 as "so similar that it can now be considered X" or "as if it is X". It states there is effectively no difference between the two. E.g. 夫婦も同然の二人、もはや勝ったも同然だ. 同様 would be more generally, "in the same manner to X", e.g. 炭酸と同様の作用を有する、操作は先ほどと同様です 同性婚は認められていないものの、夫婦と同様の税制が適用される ... same tax rules are applied . ...



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