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8

マラソン by its own strictly means running 42.195 km, as long as it is used as the name of professional athletic competitions. For example, "10000m走" (10,000 metres) is never マラソン. 長距離走【ちょうきょりそう】 is the generic term which corresponds to "long-distance running" (usually >= 5 km), which of course includes マラソン. When it comes to amateur events or PE classes at ...


8

It is an onomatopoeia, not the name for an object unless the author/speaker uses it as such for his own aesthetic purposes but this would be fairly rare. It describes the way a long object dangles, stretches, lies down, etc. in a lazy manner. The long object coud actually be anything from linguini to a cat stretching its body, from hair to stretching ...


7

According to Wikipedia and this article, 従伯叔父【いとこおじ】 (male) or 従伯叔母【いとこおば】 (female) may be the specific words you're looking for. However, anything further than いとこ (cousin), おじ/おば (uncle/aunt) is rarely used in ordinary Japanese except for はとこ (second cousin). So you should just say "母のいとこ", "母のいとこの母", etc. as long as you want to make yourself understood ...


7

生活【せいかつ】 is English life, livelihood, or living; day-to-day activities of people. 命【いのち】 is life; it's something we lose when we die. Synonyms: 生【せい】、生命【せいめい】 生気【せいき】 is more like liveliness, spirit, or energy. Synonyms: 元気【げんき】、活力【かつりょく】 一生【いっしょう】 is a whole life of someone. Synonym: 生涯【しょうがい】 人生【じんせい】 is human's (whole) life; use this only for humans, ...


6

ばり is an uncommon 接尾語 which means "like". http://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/leaf/jn2/180011/m0u/ ばり【張り】[接尾] 2 名詞や人名を表す語の下に付いて、それに似ている、または、それに似せているという意を表す。「西鶴―の文」「左翼―の主張」 So 「林家パー子ばりのアンテナ」 is "an antenna just like (that of) 林家パー子". She is known for the pink dress and the fondness for gossiping, so アンテナ here means "ability to find something interesting, or ...


6

法律 is the general word for "law", as in 「法律を守る」(obey the law),「法律で禁止されている」(forbidden by law) or 「渡辺法律事務所」(Watanabe Law Firm). I believe that the most common use of 法度【はっと】 is to mean "something that is terribly bad manners", and that it's almost always used with ご in front — 「ご法度」. A quick Web search found: 新郎・新婦の恋愛遍歴話はご法度:結婚式でゲストがやってはいけない非常識な行動 ...


6

「Verb + てやる」 has two (very) different meanings/usages. 1) To offer to do something in a patronizing or condescending tone as to demand gratitude. 2) To proactively perform an action, or perform an action so as to prove one's ability to others. OP seems to be talking about #2 above. My own example sentences: 1) 「[心配]{しんぱい}するな。1[年]{ねん}くらいオレが[食]{た}べさせてやる。」 ...


5

This is a relatively rare word! It has only one result in BCCWJ, and I couldn't find a definition for it in any of the seven monolingual dictionaries I checked. However, I did find it mentioned in the definition for 熟す in 明鏡国語辞典, where it's given as a synonym: ⑤ことばとことばが分かちがたく結びついて、熟語や慣用的な言い回しを作る。熟合{じゅくごう}する。また、新奇だったことばが一般に行われるようになる。 ...


4

[結構]{けっこう} is an extremely often-used word meaning "fairly", "pretty (much)", "to a (great) degree", etc. 結構くせがある means "to have pretty strong or peculiar habits" くせ = [癖]{くせ} = habit Lastly, [結構人]{けっこうじん} has nothing to do with 結構くせがある. It means a "very likable person".


4

According to Japan Meteorological Agency, by definition, "AのちB" stands for "A for the first half (of the period being forecasted), then B for the latter half." http://www.jma.go.jp/jma/kishou/know/faq/faq10.html Obviously the actual time depends on the "forecast period". Unless otherwise specified, "weather reports for tomorrow" on evening TV shows refer ...


4

I checked an Old Chinese corpus. The Kanji 結 was used in the sense of to form an abstract relationship about 2500 years ago, as in 結怨, 結親, 結好, etc. It could also be used intransitively, like 怨結, 恩結, 気結, 冤結, etc., which sound like to clump/condense/congeal, but it only applied to abstract emotions. It acquired the meaning to bear no later than 400 AD. It ...


3

Regarding the Japanese word musubu (as opposed to the kanji 結, which Yang Muye does an excellent job of explaining), I must side with naruto on this one. The underlying idea does not appear to be the tying, so much as the knot: something that comes together as a result of some process -- be it tying string, or growing a nodule, or coalescing from the void. ...


3

ぴろーん is an onomatopoeia to describe a long thin rolled object extends and runs like a tonge of a chameleon. It's nothing to do with adult slang terms.


3

I think the meaning is derived from the tie between stems and fruit, also in the case of apples or oranges. Fruit is born from stems, so there are necessarily some ties between them, regardless of whether the ties are apparent or not. You can use 実を結ぶ ( or more formally 結実する ) not only in a physical sense but also in a metaphorical sense "to have a ...


3

類語例解辞典 says 結ぶ in 実を結ぶ is "まとめて形にする、完成させる". http://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/leaf/thsrs/1221/m0u/ また、「実を結ぶ」「焦点を結ぶ」「夢を結ぶ」のように、まとめて形にする、完成させる意もある。 この意味の英語だと integrate という単語が tie/bond とも似た意味があるように思います。 EDIT I do not believe this "結ぶ" is "binding a fruit with a branch or a stem". When I say "実を結ぶ", I imagine a fruit which grows by itself to be mature, but I ...


3

First, 法律 is more commonly used in spoken and written Japanese than 法度 is. You can verify this notion by how the two words appear in a Google search, with 404 million for the first and 930,000 for the second. Also, ほうりつ when entered in an input bridge will immediately convert to 法律, whereas はっと will likely convert to Katakana, and only with further keyboard ...


3

I don't have any authoritative reference for now, but I think the definition you provided has room for improvement. ギタギタ/ギッタギタ/ギタンギタン/etc is a mimetic word which describes the status of someone severely beat up by a fight. More common synonyms are "けちょんけちょん" and "こてんぱん". These can also be metaphorically used for one-sided arguments/debates/games. I have not ...


2

『ときめきナーミンナイト』 a title of an episode from the web radio series Sayonara Zetsubou Housou, hosted by Shintani Ryoko and Kamiya Hiroshi. The title is apparently a play on a phrase from the manga かってに改蔵 (ときめきウーミンナイト) and Shintani Ryoko's character name (Hitou Nami). On another site this song is credited to 日塔奈美 (ナーミン). Basically, it seems to the theme song of ...


2

I believe ultimately it comes down to "say" or "call" itself. これという問題はない can be interpreted as there is no question "said like this" or "called such" = There is no question. Similarly, ということだ is the thing "said" or "called". I have heard どういうことだ which they translate it to "What do you mean?" Taking it very literally, "What is the thing you are 'saying'?" = ...


2

という actually has multiple meanings. This part of Tae Kim's Guide should be a good read for you: http://www.guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar/define


1

I think that the second example, "これという問題はない", means: the "so-called" problem doesn´t exist. I would appreciate if you could give us the context.


1

「マラソン」 is a Japanese word. It should not matter what the word "marathon" means in the original language from which Japanese borrowed the word. Likewise, 「[手紙]{てがみ}」, in Japanese, means a "letter", but 「[手紙]{shou zhi}」, in Chinese, means "toilet paper". There are no problems with that, however, because those are two different languages. Well, so much ...



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