Hot answers tagged

18

Say what? Putting aside the fact that this sounds like a whitewashed description of sexual assault, at what point in history was this "practice" so common that it was given a name? I don't know when it started, but the word originally comes from [呼ばう]{よばう} and is more commonly written as [夜這い]{よばい}. It is an old Japanese custom that was common up until the ...


17

First, concurring with Axioplase: だく is for tangible things, いだく is for abstract things. (Daijisen has a usage note under 抱える that deals with this distinction.) With regards to your second question, yes, だく can have the connotation of "sleep with" (second sense in the Daijisen definition for 抱く). It's a somewhat "nicer" way to say "sleep with" in the sense ...


16

Expanding on @TsuyoshiIto's comment above, がる basically turns an イ-adjective (or "words which conjugate like" them, as he states) into a verb. Essentially means "acting this way" or "behaving in such a way": 寒【さむ】がる → To be cold (さむがり: a person who is always cold -- like me); "acting that you are cold" 怖【こわ】がる → To be afraid of something; "behaving ...


16

Yes, 雷 refers to both the lightning and the sound caused by it. If you need to distinguish, the specific term for the visible discharge of the light is 稲妻【いなずま】, and the specific word for the sound is 雷鳴【らいめい】. Although these words often appear in news media and scientific papers, we usually just use 雷 in everyday conversations. As for the last two ...


15

Politeness and Keigo are strongly related, but they are not necessarily the same, neither does one contains all cases of the other. Politeness (丁寧語 teineigo) is a general term that is used for gauging the acceptability of different forms in different situations. Polite forms are expected to be used in formal situations, with most strangers, with peers you ...


14

Well, first, I think that うだく is archaic, as I read it: 〔上代語「むだく」の転で、「だく」の古形。平安鎌倉時代の漢文訓読にだけ見える語〕 Then, だく seems to be use for concrete situations, when you really use your hands. いだく seems to be a more literary reading, or used in abstract situations, like 「理想を―・く」「不安を―・く」. This is exactly your sentence, isn't it? Sources: on-line dictionaries ...


14

"That seems like a somewhat different movie" would be なんだか違う映画みたいだなあ Whereas "I want to see a different movie" would be なんだか違う映画をみたいなあ So to answer your question directly, yes, "を見たい" means "want to see" -- and you'd use the kanji "見たい", in most general cases. (There's no だ after みたい in this case.) When you want to say "is like", you'd say "みたい" ...


14

Completely context-dependent. Try googling "最近の年号" — in this phrase, 最近 goes back a century or more.


14

The PR does indeed stand for public relations. In English it is almost exclusively a business term used to represent a companies goals to persuade the public, employees, and other stakeholders to maintain a certain point of view about it, its leadership, products, etc. In Japanese it has the same meaning, only it can be applied to areas other than business....


13

[This answer is based on my personal (inner) research] In a nutshell, all the extended uses of たつ derive from a single meaning, which is not exactly what you'd imagine from the English word "stand". As illustrated below, my inner image for たつ is "suspended-perpendicular-upward". "stand" is the opposite: "suspended-perpendicular-downward". Yes, their ...


12

It's one of those terrifically vague statements that doesn't mean much by itself. It can mean anything, depending on the context and how well the listener knows the speaker and what he's talking about. The speaker may be stalling while he's thinking about what he's trying to say. He may be talking about something that was mentioned before in the conversation....


12

Your example says he grew facial hair. If it's a Japanese person, I would even dare say that it unambiguously refers to a beard, since I haven't seen many moustaches recently in Japan (beside mines), while I keep seeing guys struggling to get a beard :) The unambiguous words you can use are: 顎鬚 chin beard 鼻髭 moustache 口髭 moustache 山羊髭 goatee 揉み上げ ...


12

Strictly speaking, 鍵{かぎ} is key and 錠{じょう} is lock. However, in daily speech, 錠 is hardly ever used. Usually, people will say 鍵 to mean either key or lock, and the context will make it clear which one it is. However, the じょう reading does appear in several common combinations: 施錠{せじょう} (to) lock 開錠{かいじょう} unlock 南京錠{なんきんじょう} padlock


11

Let me add a little about the spelling つまづく. It is an alternate (secondary) spelling of つまずく, and not necessarily an old spelling as stated in other answers. This verb was etymologically a compound word made of つめ and つく with a vowel mutation (つめ→つま) and rendaku (つく→づく). In the historical kana orthography, it was written as つまづく, reflecting the fact that ...


11

「金」 in 「引{ひ}き金{がね}」 does not represent "money" but "metal". "Metal" is translated as 「金属{きんぞく}」 and "metal fittings" are translated as 「金具{かなぐ}」. 「引き金」 is the part of a gun that is made of metal and is for triggering the gun to fire. In English, "trigger" also means the part of a gun as a noun, and "to cause something" as a verb. References: かな‐ぐ【金具】 ...


11

[長]{なげ}え is a colloquial, masculine and a bit vulgar way of pronouncing [長]{なが}い. (Compare: うるさい→うるせえ, しらない→しらねえ, たべたい→たべてえ) The と in 長いと is a 接続助詞(conjunctive particle), meaning "if~~" or "when~~". So the なげえと(長いと) here means "If (your hair is) long" or "When (your hair is) long". バッサリいこうぜ!うっとうしいだろ長えとよ。(≒長いとうっとうしいだろ。) Let's cut it short. (Because) ...


10

本日 is keigo. You will hear this on a train or airplane, or in a store. But you won't be saying it yourself, unless if you as a beginning student are put in the unlikely position of making an official announcement to someone. 今日 is what you would use in ordinary situations.


10

マラソン by its own strictly means running 42.195 km, as long as it is used as the name of professional athletic competitions. For example, "10000m走" (10,000 metres) is never マラソン. 長距離走【ちょうきょりそう】 is the generic term which corresponds to "long-distance running" (usually >= 5 km), which of course includes マラソン. When it comes to amateur events or PE classes at ...


10

"What is 学校" is not an easy question; there are many definitions of it. but here's the summary: Legally speaking, "the narrow definition" of 学校 (aka 一条校), as defined in the first clause of the law called 学校教育法, includes public and private 小学校, 中学校, 高校, 大学, and so on. And it also does include kindergartens (!) but does not include so-called 大学校. Broader ...


9

Ah, なかなか. How often you frustrate my attempts to translate you! 「なかなか」はなかなか翻訳しづらいですね。 I will leave the discussion of inter-language correspondences to the professionals and attempt to educe a definition. For my example sentences, I will use the Chakoshi corpus from Purdue (searchable here, but the interface leaves much to be desired). First, with non-...


9

The way I understand it is that 錠{じょう} is generally used for "lock" and 鍵{かぎ} for "key". 鍵 can mean "lock" in some contexts however (this is almost certainly incomplete): 鍵を掛ける - to lock (something)(literally something like "turn a key on (something)") 鍵が掛かっている/鍵が掛かった - (something) is locked 鍵を開ける - to unlock (something) 鍵を取り付ける - "install a ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible