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17

Say what? Putting aside the fact that this sounds like a whitewashed description of sexual assault, at what point in history was this "practice" so common that it was given a name? I don't know when it started, but the word originally comes from [呼ばう]{よばう} and is more commonly written as [夜這い]{よばい}. It is an old Japanese custom that was common up until ...


15

First, concurring with Axioplase: だく is for tangible things, いだく is for abstract things. (Daijisen has a usage note under 抱える that deals with this distinction.) With regards to your second question, yes, だく can have the connotation of "sleep with" (second sense in the Daijisen definition for 抱く). It's a somewhat "nicer" way to say "sleep with" in the sense ...


14

"That seems like a somewhat different movie" would be なんだか違う映画みたいだなあ Whereas "I want to see a different movie" would be なんだか違う映画をみたいなあ So to answer your question directly, yes, "を見たい" means "want to see" -- and you'd use the kanji "見たい", in most general cases. (There's no だ after みたい in this case.) When you want to say "is like", you'd say "みたい" ...


14

Politeness and Keigo are strongly related, but they are not necessarily the same, neither does one contains all cases of the other. Politeness (丁寧語 teineigo) is a general term that is used for gauging the acceptability of different forms in different situations. Polite forms are expected to be used in formal situations, with most strangers, with peers you ...


14

Well, first, I think that うだく is archaic, as I read it: 〔上代語「むだく」の転で、「だく」の古形。平安鎌倉時代の漢文訓読にだけ見える語〕 Then, だく seems to be use for concrete situations, when you really use your hands. いだく seems to be a more literary reading, or used in abstract situations, like 「理想を―・く」「不安を―・く」. This is exactly your sentence, isn't it? Sources: on-line dictionaries ...


14

The PR does indeed stand for public relations. In English it is almost exclusively a business term used to represent a companies goals to persuade the public, employees, and other stakeholders to maintain a certain point of view about it, its leadership, products, etc. In Japanese it has the same meaning, only it can be applied to areas other than ...


13

Expanding on @TsuyoshiIto's comment above, がる basically turns an イ-adjective (or "words which conjugate like" them, as he states) into a verb. Essentially means "acting this way" or "behaving in such a way": 寒【さむ】がる → To be cold (さむがり: a person who is always cold -- like me); "acting that you are cold" 怖【こわ】がる → To be afraid of something; "behaving ...


12

Strictly speaking, 鍵{かぎ} is key and 錠{じょう} is lock. However, in daily speech, 錠 is hardly ever used. Usually, people will say 鍵 to mean either key or lock, and the context will make it clear which one it is. However, the じょう reading does appear in several common combinations: 施錠{せじょう} (to) lock 開錠{かいじょう} unlock 南京錠{なんきんじょう} padlock


10

In a Japanese context, that distinction does not matter so much, and it can be either. Since you are asking whether that Japanese word is ambiguous, I think that you are biased to English mind. It is not that the word 髭 is ambiguous; it is that a single concept in English does not match a single concept in Japanese. This is similar to fingers vs. thumbs. ...


10

It's one of those terrifically vague statements that doesn't mean much by itself. It can mean anything, depending on the context and how well the listener knows the speaker and what he's talking about. The speaker may be stalling while he's thinking about what he's trying to say. He may be talking about something that was mentioned before in the ...


10

Your example says he grew facial hair. If it's a Japanese person, I would even dare say that it unambiguously refers to a beard, since I haven't seen many moustaches recently in Japan (beside mines), while I keep seeing guys struggling to get a beard :) The unambiguous words you can use are: 顎鬚 chin beard 鼻髭 moustache 口髭 moustache 山羊髭 goatee 揉み上げ ...


10

Let me add a little about the spelling つまづく. It is an alternate (secondary) spelling of つまずく, and not necessarily an old spelling as stated in other answers. This verb was etymologically a compound word made of つめ and つく with a vowel mutation (つめ→つま) and rendaku (つく→づく). In the historical kana orthography, it was written as つまづく, reflecting the fact that ...


10

The ただいま that you say when you arrive home is a contraction of ただ今帰りました. (ただ=たったjust / 今=now / 帰りました=(I) came back/came home /returned) I think one other situation you're talking about might be where you say 'ただいま', 'Certainly, sir'/'Yes sir, I'll do that right away'/'Yes, I'll be right with you' etc., when someone tells you to do something or calls you, ...


9

[This answer is based on my personal (inner) research] In a nutshell, all the extended uses of たつ derive from a single meaning, which is not exactly what you'd imagine from the English word "stand". As illustrated below, my inner image for たつ is "suspended-perpendicular-upward". "stand" is the opposite: "suspended-perpendicular-downward". Yes, their ...


9

Short answer: Both readings have the same meaning. Whether you consider かいしゅん as a valid reading of 買春 or not depends on what you count as “valid.” Some Sino-Japanese words have not only an on reading which is shown in dictionaries as the primary reading but also an alternative reading which avoids ambiguity with some other words. 買春 is such a word. ...


9

てんとてん is not one word. It is [点]{てん}と[点]{てん}は[線]{せん}になる, or, "two points make a line", or even "dots form/make a line". [点]{てん}と[点]{てん}を[結]{むす}ぶ means "to connect two points", or even "connect the dots". UPDATE 1 I think you are just hearing せんになる as せぃになる, because んに isn't always enunciated when people are speaking (kind of like American English ...


8

Your statement わけ is not a reading for 理由. 理由 is only read りゆう is too strong. りゆう is the most natural reading, but it can also be read as わけ. Although, it is true that, as with your example 妻 with ワイフ, furigana sometimes departs from its established reading under expectation of some rhetorical effects. why わけ for 理由? Because りゆう and わけ both mean ...


8

In my feeling, those sound quite different. 世間 : the Japanese society.   ex. "世間の常識" = common sense of our society. 世界 : the whole world on the globe. Particularly outside of Japan.   ex. "世界のニュース" = international news. "世界一周" = a round-the-world trip. In short, "世間" sounds like more local stuff. is it strictly poetic and reserved for flowery ...


8

The way I understand it is that 錠{じょう} is generally used for "lock" and 鍵{かぎ} for "key". 鍵 can mean "lock" in some contexts however (this is almost certainly incomplete): 鍵を掛ける - to lock (something)(literally something like "turn a key on (something)") 鍵が掛かっている/鍵が掛かった - (something) is locked 鍵を開ける - to unlock (something) 鍵を取り付ける - "install a ...


8

ari-ki is the verb ar- "be, are" plus the recollectional past suffix -ki. The recollectional sense is all but lost and is essentially just a past tense now. -ki is not used much in modern Japanese except for fossilized patterns such as ariki and omoiki ya. ariki means that something was there; essentially atta. Your examples: mazu wa keturon ariki: This ...


8

It is an onomatopoeia, not the name for an object unless the author/speaker uses it as such for his own aesthetic purposes but this would be fairly rare. It describes the way a long object dangles, stretches, lies down, etc. in a lazy manner. The long object coud actually be anything from linguini to a cat stretching its body, from hair to stretching ...


7

つまむ can mean "to grab," so anything you can just grab casually and eat (usually with some sort of alcohol), or anything you can つまむ, is therefore おつまみ. There's lots of words that are just the noun conjugation of verbs, especially in food! (おにぎり、煮物、おひや... okay, not all of those follow the pattern, but you get the idea!) There's also another word つまみ食い, which ...


7

敬語 comes from the union of the Kanji 敬 which means "awe, respect, honor, revere" and 語 which means "word, speech, language"; it means "respectful language", it's a form of honorific speech, so here you can start to see the difference. Politeness, in English, apart from being "the practical application of good manners or etiquette", it also refers to some ...


7

Changing the consonant 's' (or 'sh' derived from it) into 'p' is sort of a diminutive. It gives the impression of cuteness/childishness. So the original form is おもしろかった. An English equivalent would be saying doggie for 'dog', etc. These forms are not at all the standard way of talking. A famous example is what came to be called ノリピー語 'Noripii-ish' in the ...


7

Most of the listed words imply some insincerity, or at least mixed motives, with the possible exception of 美辞麗句. Roughly, the nuances are as follows: お世{せ}辞{じ}: Praising someone to make them feel better (despite their poor showing) "Honey, that's a fantastic drawing, I don't care if it got a C-". 煽{おだ}て(る): Praising someone to egg them on: You're ...


7

It means to acknowledge, in the middle of doing something, that it has turned out impossible for one to reach the goal, or that one has lost against an opponent, due to lack of one's own ability or luck, and to give up. Often, but not always, this word is used in the context of a competition, such as swordsman fighting. If it is obvious that you lost, but ...


7

I think 文盲 would be the best translation to describe someone who can't read or write, and 無学 would be the best word for someone uneducated and ignorant. I don't think I've ever seen the words 無筆、一文不通、一文不知... I didn't even know how to read the latter two... (Maybe because I'm just so ignorant...) As for 活字離れ, I think it's a rather new word, describing the ...


7

I am sure someone could give a more comprehensive answer but it is usually the same as the difference between nation/state and country in English eg 国々 |countries 国家 |nation 国家的 |national 警察国家|a police state 福祉国家|a welfare state 国家の政策|national policy 国 also has a few "domestic" uses, which I imagine go back to the time when ...


7

平行 can mean the same thing as 並行 in the second sense (物事が同時に行われる), so it does not encompass 並行 completely. For example, 電車と並行して走る should not use 平行 (although don't be surprised if you see the two mixed up). However, just look at the characters, the 並 of 並行 can be seen in words like 並ぶ while the 平 of 平行 can be seen in words like 平面. So, in general, 平行 is ...



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