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2

I haven't read that book, but 旦 means morning, not evening. I think this "opening up of night" refers to the Japanese word 夜【よ】明【あ】け ("morning, dawn", where 夜=night, 明=open), but I don't know why nightbreak suddenly came in. This kanji is rarely used except in the compound 元旦【がんたん】 ("the morning of New Year's Day") or in several ateji compounds such as ...


5

Actually, there are many kinds of words meaning sin([罪]{つみ}) in Japanese language. Japanese Wikipedia has a list of links to details about each kind of 罪. https://goo.gl/ceJhFg More than 127 million Japanese people live in Japan now. Every Japanese person has human rights and freedom. What Japanese people believe are diverse. So, the reason someone does ...


0

"せずに" means "without doing." This is another instance that Google translator gives funny results. That said: Japanese Christian texts generally translate "sin" into "罪{つみ}". This is not very appropriate since "罪" primarily means "crime." I guess the e-mail wants to convey something like... As the majority of the Japanese are non-monotheistic, there is ...


7

The safest neutral phrase is ○○ファン (e.g. アニメファン / 漫画ファン / アニメやゲームのファン / etc), which is widely used both by otaku and non-otaku people. This can be safely used with non-otaku hobbies, too (e.g. サッカーファン, 将棋ファン). This is definitely the first choice, for example when you write a news article introducing (favorably) an otaku event in mass media. Other common ...


6

I think 「〜[好]{ず}き」 is a common expression in Japan these days. If someone likes anime very much, s/he is 「アニメ[好]{ず}き」. The usage example is http://news.mynavi.jp/articles/2015/06/21/ibayashi/ If someone likes manga very much, s/he is 「マンガ[好]{ず}き」. The usage example is https://www.booklista.co.jp/feature/harajyuku/ Edit: アニメ[好]{ず}き does not mean ...


2

Yes, the preferred term is a person who is involved in "subculture." From my answer to a related question: The current generation of young adult anime/manga fans in Japan are still viewed as oddball by others; they have not reached the level of acceptance by society at large that Western otaku enjoy (for example, the popularity of the TV sitcom The Big ...


1

As you said, in the past days, the honorific "様" was used to refer lords, princes, princesses, etc. (But not for kings! "陛下" is used and only used to refer kings(天皇) and kings' family in Japan.) However, after the lords thing disappeared from Japan, the honorific "様" became a much more daily used word now. Just that simple as you found in the site, "様" is ...



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