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22

There is certainly a reason for that. In this case, it is for expressing Yamane's (or the human kind's) derogatory feelings toward Godzilla. The counter 「[頭]{とう}」 simply does not carry that derogatory connotation among us Japanese-speakers; It can only be neutral. In case this is what you are wondering about, the size of Gozilla does not matter as ...


19

As it turns out, there are Japanese numbers greater than 10! Getting started, let's review the basics: 1 through 9: [一つ]{ひとつ}、[二つ]{ふたつ}、[三つ]{みっつ}、[四つ]{よっつ}、[五つ]{いつつ}、[六つ]{むっつ}、[七つ]{ななつ}、[八つ]{やっつ}、[九つ]{ここのつ} Going above 20, つ changes into そ. Here are the 10s through 90: ...


11

Here is a good list of numbers in [大和言葉]{やまとことば}. http://www.sf.airnet.ne.jp/~ts/language/number/ancient_japanesej.html Beginning and intermediate Japanese-learners may think that we only use 1-10 from the list in Modern Japanese, but that is not true. For instance, native speakers frequently use these to tell people's ages euphemistically. はたち ...


9

一組 is pronounced in two ways in Japanese for two different meanings. ひとくみ: a pair of ~~, a set of ~~ Examples: ひとくみのカップル、ひとくみのディナーウェアー いちくみ: Group #1 (among multiple groups) Example: Name of class in school (二年一組、六年一組, etc.) 一組 is never officially read いちぐみ, いっくみ or いっぐみ in real life. However, you will once in a while hear people say いっくみ to mean Group ...


8

Googling the two terms in Japanese, there are a great deal of discussions among the Japanese about when to use which as clearly ambiguous to them as much as it is to you. One of such quoted the definitions from Dictionary of How to Count (『数え方の辞典』) written by Asako Iida (飯田朝子). ================ 【匹】 ・大型ではない生物全般。 ・小型の哺乳類。 ・小型の爬虫類、両棲類。 ・魚類。 【頭】 ・大型の哺乳類。 ...


7

Yes, you can say 何人目【なんにんめ】. You can add 目 to a counter regardless of whether it's attached to a specific number like 3 or a question word like 何, so you can say things like 何人目 or 何代目. Here's an example of the latter from ALC: 「クリントンはアメリカの何代目の大統領ですか?」「第42代大統領です」 "Where was Clinton in the chronological order of Presidents?" "He was the 42nd ...


7

Unless you are looking for some deep meaning I cannot think of, I would say it is applicable because the song is played by 6 guys --- 4 from Monkey Majik and 2 from the Yoshida Brothers. That is 12 arms all together instead of saying "the 6 of us".


7

See 古代日本語の数体系 はたち、みそじ is still for referring people's age. い、いそ、ち、や, よろず, etc are often seen in proper names, and fixed phrases. 1-9 10-90 100-900 1k-9000 10000 1 ひとつ とを もも ち よろづ 2 ふたつ はたち ふたほ ふたち ふたよろづ 3 みつ みそぢ みほ みち みよろづ 4 よつ よそぢ よほ よち よよろづ ...


7

Use 「3つのグラフ」 or 「3枚【まい】のグラフ」. Whichever is OK, but maybe the latter will sound just a little bit more formal.


6

This answer is supplementary, but using the counter 匹 for large animals is not so unnatural in daily conversations. For example, Google returns roughly the same number of results for "2匹の象" and "2頭の象". I haven't checked out each of the results, but it's very unlikely that all those people using 2匹の象 are elephant haters. If explicitly asked "what is the ...


6

In basically all daily conversations, the only natural way to express the numbers and items is: Name of item + (particle) + number + counter + verb phrase Natural: 「ビッグマックをふたつ[食]{た}べた。」 = "I ate two Big Macs." Natural: 「みそラーメン(を)よっつ[下]{くだ}さい。」 = "Four miso-ramens, please!" Unnatural though grammatical: 「ふたつのビッグマックを食べた。」 & 「よっつのみそラーメンを下さい。」 The ...


6

You are correct on 話 for "episode" and 章 for "chapter" (the Bible in Japanese uses 章 for chapter). I'm not sure about "act", but multiple searches show [幕]{まく}. Also related is [巻]{かん} for "volume" and [場]{ば} for "scene".


5

分 isn't only used for "minutes", but also for "parts". For example, fractions are read ⅓ 三分の一 さんぶん の いち lit. one of three parts When 3分 means "three parts", it is always read さんぶん, not さんぷん. When 3分 means "three minutes", it is always read さんぷん, not さんぶん. Similarly, よんぷん = "four minutes" and よんぶん = "four parts". さんふん and よんふん are non-standard ...


5

Yes, it is and and it is always preceded by both a 「[第]{だい}」 and a number. In my own words, 「第N[次]{じ}」 is used to describe the ordinality of an unpredictable event of the same kind like a war or a boom. We use 「第N[回]{かい}」 to describe the ordinality of a planned event of the same kind, such as an annual event.


4

しつもん(質問) means question, so the sentence would be わたしは しつもんが あります。 Interestingly the counter for question is もん(問) which is the last syllable of しつもん source。 I don't know how to say you have three questions, as you can probably tell I'm not a native speaker, but I think you can say I have some questions, using いくつか(幾つか) which means some, a few or several ...


4

Always use 行 (ぎょう) for the lines (in a book chapter, a programming code, etc.), no matter whether the sentence is written horizontally (横書き) or vertically (縦書き). For example, "Removing three lines from the CSS file" is as follows: CSSファイルから3行抜く


4

The changes you're talking about are actually pretty regular. There are some irregular ones (一人【ひとり】、二人【ふたり】、三階【さんがい】), but what you're looking for is pretty straight-forward. Wikipedia has a pretty good summary of the sound changes.


3

Chinese-derived numbers might be more common (although I don't know by what margin), but native-Japanese counter words are also ubiquitous. To quote the first page (of 319 pages) from the counter word dictionary 数え方の辞典, アース ▲本 アーチ ▲本 アーティチョーク ▲本 ●株【かぶ】 ▲個 アーム ▲本 アーモンド ●粒 ▲個 合い鍵 ▲本 アイコン ▲個 挨拶 ...


3

I think that the sequence beginning 一番・二番・三番 corresponds roughly to number one, number two, number three. Each word in this sequence is formed from the combination of a numeral (一・二・三) with a counter meaning number (番). You can take this list and add the ordinal suffix 目 to each word, producing the list 一番目・二番目・三番目, corresponding roughly to first, second, ...


3

From the definition for 部 in 数え方の辞典: ② 書籍やひとまとまりの文書を数えます。  a. 書物や印刷物などの、複製した数を数えます。    「100万部のベストセラー小説」    「コピーを20部作成する」  b. 数冊の書籍を一括して数えるのに用います。    「1部5冊」 So yes, 部 is a counter for copies of printed materials, as in sense 2a. This counter isn't limited to just newspapers and magazines like WWWJDIC appears to suggest, ...


2

Yes, 部 is a counter for copies of a newspapers, etc. and it applies to a broader range of printed materials as well. WWWJDIC gives one of the meanings as "(5) counter for copies of a newspaper or magazine." It also gives 一部 as a broader meaning "one copy (e.g. of a document)."


2

For general purposes, if you don't know a more specific one to apply, the common practice is to use 個【こ】. In limited cases I've heard it advised to use just the number without a counter as well, but I generally try to avoid this if possible.


2

Counters for days also use Japanese numerals, from 2 to 10: ふつか, みっか, よっか... . 20th also uses a native counter: はつか. Some day numbers use mixed counters (14, 24): じゅうよっか, にじゅうよっか.


2

I think 「二番目」 just means "second" as "second in order" which is not really a counter of people but a way of expressing order, including order of people. The king first calls a servant and then calls the second (in order servant). Quickly looking in the internet, I found some other examples of applying 「二番目」 to people: 二番目の女から本命彼女になる方法 (link) ...


1

Hm that's quite hard.. If you say パンが一本 it definitely does not mean bread that is round or cubicle (it has to be long in some sense), whereas パンが一個 could both refer to round/cubicle one or a longer one. I'd say "two (unspecified) eggplants" would be more correct. You definitely can't convey without ambiguity that it's not long by referring to it as 個



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