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26

There is certainly a reason for that. In this case, it is for expressing Yamane's (or the human kind's) derogatory feelings toward Godzilla. The counter 「[頭]{とう}」 simply does not carry that derogatory connotation among us Japanese-speakers; It can only be neutral. In case this is what you are wondering about, the size of Gozilla does not matter as ...


20

As it turns out, there are Japanese numbers greater than 10! Getting started, let's review the basics: 1 through 9: [一つ]{ひとつ}、[二つ]{ふたつ}、[三つ]{みっつ}、[四つ]{よっつ}、[五つ]{いつつ}、[六つ]{むっつ}、[七つ]{ななつ}、[八つ]{やっつ}、[九つ]{ここのつ} Going above 20, つ changes into そ. Here are the 10s through 90: ...


17

Your book is correct. When talking about human body temperature, 三十 is often omitted, probably because it is obvious. While there is nothing wrong with saying 37度8分 (37.8 degrees Celsius), it is often abbreviated to 7度8分. Even 37度 (37 degrees Celsius) without a fractional part sometimes becomes 7度. You cannot abbreviate the temperature when it is 40 ...


14

That is the 略字 for 枡, the square vessel used for sake and a measurement of volume. EDIT: Punningly, also used as an abbreviation for the verb ending ーます during the Edo period: また、「ます」と呼ぶことから丁寧の語尾(助動詞)の「ます」の置き換えとしても使用されることが多かった。(例:豆腐あり〼)この用例は江戸時代にはかなり多かったが現代になってからは使用頻度が少なくなった。


13

For counting a number of occurrences 回 and 度 are interchangeable with small numbers. Somewhere around 4 (the line is quite vague), 度 becomes uncommon, and by the time you get to 6, 回 is pretty much the only one used. (Naturally, 度 can be used with any number for counting degrees, as noted in Azeworai's informative answer.)


13

I believe that the usual counter is 話{わ}, literally meaning stories, so you'd say 10話 for ten episodes, and 第10話 or 10話目 for the tenth episode. Occasionally I've seen shows that used different counters for their own title cards. For example, ふしぎの海のナディア numbered all its episodes using 回, so for instance the tenth episode was 第10回. And 神秘の世界エルハザード numbered ...


12

From experience, I find Japanese people having lots of trouble converting between Japanese and Gregorian calendar years. I regularly surprise people with my ability to do that as follows (Japanese calendar years are often represented with an alphabet character like S or H.): Showa Era (1925 to 1989) Subtract 1900 (e.g. 1976 - 1900 = 76) Subtract 25 (e.g. ...


12

In a restaurant it is usually enough to simply ask for お箸を下さい. It is perfectly understood that that means "enough chopsticks for me [and my companions], please". Anything more specific is usually unnatural. If you do need to specify how many pairs of chopsticks exactly, you'd usually use 〜膳 -zen.


11

Here is a good list of numbers in [大和言葉]{やまとことば}. http://www.sf.airnet.ne.jp/~ts/language/number/ancient_japanesej.html Beginning and intermediate Japanese-learners may think that we only use 1-10 from the list in Modern Japanese, but that is not true. For instance, native speakers frequently use these to tell people's ages euphemistically. はたち ...


10

This is pretty common in restaurants etc, both by staff and by customers. I think it's just to make counting easier. For example, ビール is counted with 杯{はい} when seved in a glass, but 本{ほん} when served in a bottle. If rice is served in a chawan, it would be 杯{はい}, but when served on a plate, it would be 皿{さら}. So ~つ is just being used as a generic "X ...


10

In old Chinese--where Japan borrowed the term--口 was a counter for people. More specifically, it referred to the number of people needing food. English has this construction too: the number of "mouths" (=people) to feed. As for 個, it generally refers to individual non-animate items.


9

I believe the most common thing to do with sandwiches is use つ. (サンドイッチを3つもらえますか?) There probably is a correct counter for loaves of bread, but I don't know it, and again I think つ is more common.


9

The article at Wikipedia covers the common ones as well as a decent number of extended ones, and lists the exceptions for days, people, etc. as well as rendaku and number word changes (e.g. 300->san*bya*ku, 4:00-> *yo*ji).


9

一組 is pronounced in two ways in Japanese for two different meanings. ひとくみ: a pair of ~~, a set of ~~ Examples: ひとくみのカップル、ひとくみのディナーウェアー いちくみ: Group #1 (among multiple groups) Example: Name of class in school (二年一組、六年一組, etc.) 一組 is never officially read いちぐみ, いっくみ or いっぐみ in real life. However, you will once in a while hear people say いっくみ to mean Group ...


8

I don't personally know the answer, but exploring my way through EDICT: a) In the definition, sense 3 - counter for horses - is listed only as "き only" (so not ひき); it is also marked as an archaic term. b) Skimming the examples page for 馬, I could only find one example using a counter: そのレースで争った馬は4頭だけだった。 Only four horses competed in the race. ...


8

The English "by" is read 「かける multiply」 in Japanese. A 3x4 matrix, for example, is 「3かける4行列」 in Japanese. I assume your readings are right in the second part of your question, but can't seem to find them anywhere.


8

In your example, context wise is the same they're both correct because they're counting an occurrence- both words can be used for counting occurrences. 度 can be used for counting degrees in angles and temperature whereas 回 cannot. 回 is more often used for rounds and revolutions whereas 度 is not used. To be explicit, my dictionary(midori) categorises ...


8

Googling the two terms in Japanese, there are a great deal of discussions among the Japanese about when to use which as clearly ambiguous to them as much as it is to you. One of such quoted the definitions from Dictionary of How to Count (『数え方の辞典』) written by Asako Iida (飯田朝子). ================ 【匹】 ・大型ではない生物全般。 ・小型の哺乳類。 ・小型の爬虫類、両棲類。 ・魚類。 【頭】 ・大型の哺乳類。 ...


8

You are almost there. ~全部{ぜんぶ}3つ~ sounds definitely off, but 3つ全部{ぜんぶ} is fine. The first, the second, the third... 一番目{いちばんめ}、二番目{にばんめ}、三番目{さんばんめ} Slightly more formal tone. 1つ目{め}、2つ目{め}、3つ目{め} Slightly more casual tone, perhaps used more often between people of equal / similar status. All 3 of them, all of them 3つとも これらすべて 3つすべて 全部 If there were ...


8

The ordinal prefix 第 is read だい. This is sense two in 大辞泉: [接頭]数を表す語に付いて、ものの順序を表すのに用いる。「世界―一の都会」「―五巻」「―三レース」「―六感」 The counter 話 is read わ, and it attaches to Sino-Japanese numerals such as いち. Put it all together and you get だいいちわ.


7

If you get a number of items from a convenience store in Japan the clerk will ask you how many chopsticks you want, and even these staff (not always the most educated of Japanese) will properly ask "ohashi nanzen" お箸何膳, i.e. how many (pairs of) chopsticks do you want? This is proper and natural and not bookish. I have never heard anyone use "hon" 本 as a ...


7

This isn't a dumb question at all! For the most part, you do have to modify the number, you can't just say it by itself. You can't ask for just two bottles of beer, you have to add the counter (ほん) or use ふたつ. One scenario where you can just use the numbers is if you're just counting for the sake of counting. Like, for example, you're counting jumping jacks ...


7

There are entire dictionaries for this (数え方の辞典). Here's a link to a whole bunch. 個 (ko) is the most commonly used one. Japanese people use it often even with words that should have a special counter if it's a less-often used one. It can sometimes be annoying even for them to think of the proper 数詞! Here are most common ones I can think of: 人 (nin) for ...


7

You'd fall back to 個. It's understandable to count everything as 個, and in many cases it's acceptable (or the only common way) as well. Counting animals as 個 does sound quite weird though, so you might want to avoid that. And never count people as 個. That's just wrong.


7

Following this advice on Meta, I'm going to throw in an answer I'm pretty sure of, but could be corrected on. Scanning down the list of example counters in the Wikipedia article you linked to, every one of them starts with 一{いち}, or it's phonetically adjusted equivalents like 一{いっ}. There were a lot, though, so maybe I missed one or two exceptions. Thus, ...



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