Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

Let's start with something common: 夢は夢だ。 'Dreams are dreams.' Let's negate it (using ではない instead of its contracted form じゃない): 夢は夢ではない。 'Dreams are not dreams.' は is a 係助詞{かかりじょし} ("binding particle"). Any 係助詞 fits in this spot. しか is also a 係助詞: 夢は夢でしかない。'Dreams are nothing but dreams.' The "modern" grammatical analysis of this stuff is ...


6

It's used for politeness. Here's what Martin writes in his 1975 Reference Grammar of Japanese, p.603: Sometimes the perfect is used more for politeness than for time reference: あなたはどなたでした = お名前は何とおっしゃいましたか ‘What did you say your name was?’ (when the person has actually not yet said); 判子をお持ちでしたね ‘You have your chop (= signature-seal) ...


6

I think 好き was originally a noun derived from 好く, but then it came to be used as a na-adjective as well. In fact, most na-adjectives derive from nouns (and some people consider them to still be nouns). The following quote is from Origins of the Verbalizer Affixes in the Japonic Languages by Tyler Lau: Uehara (2003) provides a compelling argument for ...


5

You're right, this is a form of だ. You're probably used to seeing な following na-adjectives. It can be considered the form of だ that appears before nouns: キレイだ    ←  Here, だ ends a clause. キレイな花   ←  Here, だ changes to な before the noun 花. But when だ follows a regular noun, it typically doesn't take the な form. The main exception is when it ...


5

If you were to say 夢は夢しかない then it would have a meaning of something like "dreams have nothing but dreams." It's the simple ~は~が construction you learn in Japanese 101 to describe a particular feature of a subject. This is not a copula. As you mention, you should be looking at it in terms of である. If you take out the しか you'll have the normal copula 夢は夢ではない, ...


5

When you have never met someone (or have no way of knowing the person, e.g. on the phone), どちら様ですか is how to enquire for someone's name/identity. When the circumstances/your memory suggest that you have met before, but you simply don't recall who they are, どちら様でしたか is more natural. (Note that, by extension, you can also use どちら様でしたか in the first case by ...


3

As noel_lapin mostly answered, this form of sentence does not assume any implicit question. I don't know the grammatical classification that describes this use, but "もらうのだった" has a sense of repeated occurrences that became customary, that they have always done so, not just in this particular occasion. It is a particularly common form of speech for old story ...


3

I think the confusion arises because です can both replace だ as the copula (行きたかったんです), or simply mark politeness (行きたかったです). The correction you received has little to do with a grammatical need for だ or です in a sentence, but rather the two improved versions sound more natural. Grammatically speaking, ドイツはいちども行ったことがないから、ずっと行きたかった。 is perfectly fine. ...


2

This だ is a copula. It's a plain form of the copula - copula has similar forms as verbs. You may know its polite form as well - です (warning though - です is not only a copula, it may also be just a marker of polite speech level). それはとってもいい話です。 is the polite version of the same sentence. Copula doesn't really act on the noun, rather it links the subject それ ...


2

い adjective + です was originally a slang used by people who were not familiar with standard Japanese and only recently (1952) officially accepted. Still now, it's not considered really sophisticated, in my oppinion. Only おいしゅうございます etc were correct until then. And there is a comment that says it's standard in Tohoku dialect, but that is not true at all. ...


1

I really don't quite understand which part of the fantastic answer on the linked question you don't understand. I'll try to add some notes. である is for all practical purposes a copula (like だ). This means in particular that your sentence structure will consist of a topic/subject and a predicating noun phrase. The topics/subject may be marked by は/が/も; the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible