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10

Not all complements are direct objects. Let's look at each language, one by one: English I am Hana. Be is an intransitive copular verb, here in its form am. It takes Hana as a copular complement, but that complement is not a direct object. Instead, it's what is traditionally known as a "subject complement", sometimes called a "predicative ...


9

ばかり【bakari】 is a 副助詞 (adverbial particle), which is derived from the 連用形 (-masu stem) of the verb はかる. But the particle (and 連用形 in general) behaves much like a noun. (Join to other noun-like words with の, make into a predicate by adding だ, etc.) Now you essentially have a noun phrase 食べたばかり. To make a sentence out of this, you have to add だ・です (or だった・でした ...


8

I think there is a slight difference in what the uncertainty is about: … 六十五歳を過ぎ、<unsure>体力的な衰えを感じはじめた</unsure>だろう頃だ。 … <unsure>六十五歳を過ぎ、体力的な衰えを感じはじめた頃</unsure>だろう。 In #1, the uncertainty is less about the actual time frame, and more about what their physical condition had been. In #2, it seems that the uncertainty is ...


6

独身{どくしん} で ハンサム だから ね Without further context it's hard to tell who is the subject/object of this phrase, but it shall be read: It's because だから someone is single and... どくしんで handsome ハンサム


6

I would like to add a clarification to user4092's answer: In English, present tense verbs are changed to past tense in reported speech. "My mum said it was fun" would mean that she said she had fun as the activity was going on. If this is what you meant, then the Japanese sentence below is the answer: English direct speech: My mum said, "This is fun!" ...


6

Basically, the casual form is ~だからだ and its polite form is ~だからです. e.g. ネコだからだ(よ)。 人間だからです。 坊やだからさ。 The から is a 接続助詞(conjunctive particle), definition #1 in デジタル大辞泉: 2⃣ [接助]活用語の終止形に付く。 1 理由・原因を表す。「もう遅いから帰ろう」 (attached to the predicative form of 活用語. 1. indicates a reason or cause.) The から needs to be attached to the predicative form such ...


5

である is formal, but not polite であります is formal and polite, but not humble でございます is formal and polite and humble だ is informal, but not polite です is informal-* and polite *- compared to である A politician giving a speech on TV: 我々は日本国民である - We are Japanese citizens A lawyer speaking to a judge: (I think this usage is rare though...) ...


4

Treating で as の中で: Among/in Japanese foods, as for the most liked thing, what is it? Treating で as て-form of だ: It is Japanese food and, as for the most liked thing, what is it? To me the first interpretation makes perfect sense. The second interpretation doesn't work. What is it? It's Japanese food. We just said so.


4

たとえ{おまえ自身が(強く記録し、その復活を望んだ)→}人間がいたとしてもだ。 たとえ~としてもだ means "(the aforementioned sentence is true) Even if ...". たとえ is optional. Example: 何も喋るな。たとえ聞かれてもだ。 (≒ たとえ聞かれても、何も喋るな。) Don't say anything. Even if you're asked. その復活を望んだ人間がいた refers to B: the person whose revival you desired. Depending on the context, 復活を望む人間 by itself can mean "someone who is ...


3

日本語 もうおっしゃったように 「次の信号を左」、「前の角を右」 云々は、肝要なところが抜けているだけだと存じます。 本来なら完全な文書では、 次の信号を左。。。に曲がります 前の角を右。。。に曲がってください まで言いますが、省略してしまうのが一般的ですね。 下記のように: 「図書館の前を歩く」 「空を飛ぶ」 「曲がる」・「飛ぶ」・「歩く」・「走る」のような「移動性」のある動詞の対象となる語をよく「を」でマークします。 それで、「で」は何故だめなのかについては、勘で言っているだけですが、「で」を移動動詞と使うと、「で」の「手段」を指定する機能を先に考えてしまうからではないでしょうか? 例えば、 道を歩く 道で歩く 道では歩けるが、...


3

「昨日までは間違いなくトーストにゆで卵だったはずだ」 is like 「(私の記憶では)昨日までは絶対にトーストにゆで卵だった」, "I'm sure it was toast and boiled eggs / It must have been toast and boiled eggs until yesterday (as far as I can remember)". Compare: 「XXだったはずだ」 -- "it must have been XX" "I am sure it was XX" vs  「XXのはずだった」 -- "it should have been XX" "it was supposed to be XX" By the way, ...


2

[one or more factors that make one popular etc.]だからね This is a common phrase to acknowledge someone for being pretty good in some way (popular, smart, etc.) either in front of them or when gossiping about them. It's basically "It makes sense how he's popular with women when you know that he's single and handsome." Japanese people fill in that sentence ...


2

Simply put, じゃろ and じゃろう are だろ and だろう, but in another dialect. Other forms include やろ and やろう. If you're wondering how they could all come about, they originally come from であろう. In ancient times, some dialects (including the standard, I believe) pronounced で what would be written as じぇ now, and so their であろう contracted naturally to じゃろう. やろう comes from ...


2

[食]{た}べたばかりだ。(Tabeta bakari da) I have just eaten. 食べたばかりなの?(Tabeta bakari nano?) Have you just eaten? 食べたばかりではない。(Tabeta bakari dewa nai) I have not just eaten. There is a writing style named 論文調 that is for an essay in Japanese, and the end of sentence is 'da/dearu' meaning the assertion. It seems that any examples of the language textbooks ...


1

Does it make more sense to you if I reorganize your translated sentence like this? I have unmistakable expectation that it was toast and eggs until yesterday. The way I see it, getting something else today doesn't contradict his strong belief that before today it was always toast and eggs. He still has that belief (not sure if "expectation" is an ...


1

As you said, “だ” is a colloquial form of “です,” a predicate meaning “is, am,” and "食べたばかりだ” means “I’ve finished meal just now.” “だ” here functions as I am in the state of having finished meal just now.


1

No, you don't need it. But you should translate "my mom" to "(watashi-no) haha" and "it was fun" to "tanoshikatta", as a whole "(watashi-no) haha-wa tanoshikatta-to itta".



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