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6

It's used for politeness. Here's what Martin writes in his 1975 Reference Grammar of Japanese, p.603: Sometimes the perfect is used more for politeness than for time reference: あなたはどなたでした = お名前は何とおっしゃいましたか ‘What did you say your name was?’ (when the person has actually not yet said); 判子をお持ちでしたね ‘You have your chop (= signature-seal) ...


5

You're right, this is a form of だ. You're probably used to seeing な following na-adjectives. It can be considered the form of だ that appears before nouns: キレイだ    ←  Here, だ ends a clause. キレイな花   ←  Here, だ changes to な before the noun 花. But when だ follows a regular noun, it typically doesn't take the な form. The main exception is when it ...


5

How about using the English copula in this case too? "And there was Hanako, lost for words to comfort her sister, Kayo" Or in the case of the second, "the" could work too: "The ever evolving convenience store: with 40 years since its inception, blah blah blah" As for meaning, it doesn't mean anything special per se, but to me it feels "defining" for lack ...


4

When you read that で is the 連用形 of 断定の助動詞「だ」, that's a reanalysis. That is, from a modern perspective it makes sense to talk about it that way, and you should be familiar with the concept if for no other reason than to understand dictionary entries. But that doesn't mean that's how it came about historically. Of course だ is contracted from である, and ...


4

When you have never met someone (or have no way of knowing the person, e.g. on the phone), どちら様ですか is how to enquire for someone's name/identity. When the circumstances/your memory suggest that you have met before, but you simply don't recall who they are, どちら様でしたか is more natural. (Note that, by extension, you can also use どちら様でしたか in the first case by ...


3

As noel_lapin mostly answered, this form of sentence does not assume any implicit question. I don't know the grammatical classification that describes this use, but "もらうのだった" has a sense of repeated occurrences that became customary, that they have always done so, not just in this particular occasion. It is a particularly common form of speech for old story ...


2

When there is no copula and nothing seems to be omitted, as in your second example, I interpret the sentence as simply a fragment, used to "set the scene", and would translate it as such. It is very reminiscent of how fragments are used in descriptive passages in English: Pale druggists in remote towns of the Epworth League and flannel nightgown belts, ...


2

This だ is a copula. It's a plain form of the copula - copula has similar forms as verbs. You may know its polite form as well - です (warning though - です is not only a copula, it may also be just a marker of polite speech level). それはとってもいい話です。 is the polite version of the same sentence. Copula doesn't really act on the noun, rather it links the subject それ ...


2

The particle construction ~(な)のに expresses the adversative, i.e. in English (al)though, even though, etc. The の in ~のに and ~なのに is a suffix that functions as a nominalizer. の turns any inflected expression into a noun, and なの does the some for expressions that cannot be inflected. This happens in order to make the attachment of grammatical markers possible ...


1

The で in 「名詞 + である」 is not a particle/助詞, but a 助動詞(auxiliary verb). The ある in 「名詞 + である」 is not a 補助動詞(subsidiary verb) because 補助動詞 should follow a te-form verb. The ある in [包]{つつ}んである、[畳]{たた}んである、[組]{く}んである etc. would be a 補助動詞. The である in 「名詞 + である」 consists of 助動詞「だ」の連用形「で」 + 動詞「ある」. 「名詞 + である。」 at the end of a sentence functions in the same way as ...


1

I really don't quite understand which part of the fantastic answer on the linked question you don't understand. I'll try to add some notes. である is for all practical purposes a copula (like だ). This means in particular that your sentence structure will consist of a topic/subject and a predicating noun phrase. The topics/subject may be marked by は/が/も; the ...



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