Hot answers tagged

5

である is formal, but not polite であります is formal and polite, but not humble でございます is formal and polite and humble だ is informal, but not polite です is informal-* and polite *- compared to である A politician giving a speech on TV: 我々は日本国民である - We are Japanese citizens A lawyer speaking to a judge: (I think this usage is rare though...) ...


3

日本語 もうおっしゃったように 「次の信号を左」、「前の角を右」 云々は、肝要なところが抜けているだけだと存じます。 本来なら完全な文書では、 次の信号を左。。。に曲がります 前の角を右。。。に曲がってください まで言いますが、省略してしまうのが一般的ですね。 下記のように: 「図書館の前を歩く」 「空を飛ぶ」 「曲がる」・「飛ぶ」・「歩く」・「走る」のような「移動性」のある動詞の対象となる語をよく「を」でマークします。 それで、「で」は何故だめなのかについては、勘で言っているだけですが、「で」を移動動詞と使うと、「で」の「手段」を指定する機能を先に考えてしまうからではないでしょうか? 例えば、 道を歩く 道で歩く 道では歩けるが、...


3

「昨日までは間違いなくトーストにゆで卵だったはずだ」 is like 「(私の記憶では)昨日までは絶対にトーストにゆで卵だった」, "I'm sure it was toast and boiled eggs / It must have been toast and boiled eggs until yesterday (as far as I can remember)". Compare: 「XXだったはずだ」 -- "it must have been XX" "I am sure it was XX" vs  「XXのはずだった」 -- "it should have been XX" "it was supposed to be XX" By the way, ...


1

Does it make more sense to you if I reorganize your translated sentence like this? I have unmistakable expectation that it was toast and eggs until yesterday. The way I see it, getting something else today doesn't contradict his strong belief that before today it was always toast and eggs. He still has that belief (not sure if "expectation" is an ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible