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8

This is an abbreviated form of 〜てくれない, meaning "to not do 〜 for me". So 貸してくれない means "won't lend me", but phrased as a question like this (likely with a rising intonation) mean "Hey Maruo, won't you lend me your dictionary for a bit?"


6

えらかァない is a colloquial, collapsed way of saying えらくはない. えらく(連用形/continuative form of えらい) + は(係助詞/binding particle) + negative ない 「おいらよりマシかぁ、なぁんだ、じゃあえらいなぁ。」 「別にえらかァないよ...」 "Better than me? Well, you're distinguished/great, then." "I'm not particularly distinguished/great..."


5

You can add focus particles like は or も to verbs, but in order to do so, you have to split the verb into two parts so that the particle has some place to go. We'll split the verb into its the continuative stem (called 連用形 in Japanese) and the verb する. For example:   忘れる   → 忘れ+する   忘れる+も = 忘れもする Or:   忘れない   → 忘れ+しない   忘れない+は = 忘れはしない Your example ...


5

It's [一体]{いったい}[何]{なに}を[騒]{さわ}いでいるんだ? or 騒いでいるんですか? "What's the fuss about?" in some regional dialect or the role language for old speakers.


5

It's contracted with the particle は: オレたち+は → オレたちゃ


5

ス in this case is a colloquial shortening of です. I think the reason people write it with Katakana is that it makes it easier to tell that's a new word rather than んす being a typographical error for something else. If you look for っす you can find entries that explain that this is a [丁寧]{ていねい} colloquialism (http://www.weblio.jp/content/%E3%81%A3%E3%81%99). ...


4

じゃ is the contraction of では. It's a contraction, because じゃ is one mora (one unit length) and では is two moras long. じゃ is frequently used as contraction of では, especially in じゃない < ではない. As pointed out before by one of our native speakers on this site (@l'électeur), じゃありません is at risk of being overused by learners. Presumably, because the uncontracted では ...


4

Yes, やんなっちゃう is short for いやになっちゃう, which is short for いやになってしまう. いやになる is a fixed phrase meaning "to be fed up / sick / disgusted". So やんなっちゃうなあ is something like "Now I'm starting to feel disgusted", "I can't help being sick".


3

「なっ」=「な」=「なあ」 Among those, 「なあ」 would be the "dictionary" form. This is an interjection that is often used to address a person or call someone's attention. One thing Japanese-learners should remember is that we only use this interjection with people who we know well and who are equals or below us in age and/or social status. You do not use it with ...


3

どゆこと is a shortening of どういうこと. 言う is often pronounced ゆう and the ゆ appears in all sorts of inflections of いう, like ゆえない for いえない or ゆって for いって etc. TV subtitles often use spellings that are supposed to reflect words as they might be spoken, like どゆこと or やってます for やっています or やだ for いやだ. In the case of どゆこと it conveys maybe a little extra surprise, because ...


2

It is two verbs. You just had the two wrong verbs in mind. 落{お}としちまった is the colloquial form of 落{お}としてしまった, which in turn is comprised of the following two verbs: 落{お}として (て form): 落とす (jisho.org) しまった (past form): しまう (jisho.org) By slurring the pronunciation of てし, you end up with ち, hence 落{お}としてしまった→ 落{お}としちまった ちまう has its own dictionary entry ...


2

ありっちゃあり is indeed a contraction of ありといえばあり and it's a way of saying "yeah, sure, why not...". As you say, it's completely parallel to おいしいといえばおいしい, just with あり (which means something like "something is possible/doable/acceptable/...").


2

ありゃしない in the context means "doesn't exists". So the whole sentence means "This good price doesn't exists anywhere else in this world." By the way, ありゃしない is a spoken form of ありはしない. It consists of ある(exists) + しない(deny).


2

な is basically the same as ね in this context, and it basically just means "hey," or something you use to get someone's attention. A っ at the end of a word just means the last sound is dragged out a bit.


1

It is simply a contraction. (Well, I am not sure what word is phonologically correct. But, this change does not change its meaning.) We still use both expressions, but mainly left when it is pronounced. 音便 : https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E9%9F%B3%E4%BE%BF#.E6.92.A5.E9.9F.B3.E4.BE.BF


1

I find nothing wrong if someone gave a nickname いず to someone. いず happens to have the same sound as 出ず ("to exit"), 居ず ("absent"), and 伊豆 (province), but that won't be a problem. I don't think いず is very common as a nickname for いずみ, but there's at least one real person whose nickname is いず. I personally hear いずみん a lot (though it's not a contraction).



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