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12

救われん is made of 救われる and the archaic suffix ん, which came out of む. む・ん had similar rôles to よう・おう today; that is to say, 救われん in modern style would be 救われよう or 救われるだろう. It is not related to the ん that comes out of ぬ, which is a strong or dialectal way of stating a negative. Additionally, as chocolate says in the comments, 祈り信じよ means 'Pray and believe', ...


8

This is an abbreviated form of 〜てくれない, meaning "to not do 〜 for me". So 貸してくれない means "won't lend me", but phrased as a question like this (likely with a rising intonation) mean "Hey Maruo, won't you lend me your dictionary for a bit?"


6

It is a sound change of "とは". It may be used in old city(下町 in Japanese) in Tokyo.


6

えらかァない is a colloquial, collapsed way of saying えらくはない. えらく(連用形/continuative form of えらい) + は(係助詞/binding particle) + negative ない 「おいらよりマシかぁ、なぁんだ、じゃあえらいなぁ。」 「別にえらかァないよ...」 "Better than me? Well, you're distinguished/great, then." "I'm not particularly distinguished/great..."


5

ス in this case is a colloquial shortening of です. I think the reason people write it with Katakana is that it makes it easier to tell that's a new word rather than んす being a typographical error for something else. If you look for っす you can find entries that explain that this is a [丁寧]{ていねい} colloquialism (http://www.weblio.jp/content/%E3%81%A3%E3%81%99). ...


4

僕がついてればいいんですけど。いそがしいもんでね。 ついてれば is a contracted form of ついていれば. (dropping い) The ついて (dictionary form [付]{つ}く) here means "to accompany~", "to be with~". 「~ていればいい」, consisting of the te-form verb + いれ(仮定形 of subsidiary verb 居る) + ば(conjunctive particle) + いい(良い), means "It's good if ~~" "It'd be better if ~~" or "I wish ~~ could ~~", etc. I wish I ...


4

“食べてたい” is a colloquial and contracted form of - ”食べていたい - I want to keep eating.” Likewise, “寝てたい – I want to stay in bed,” “起きてたい ‐ I want to stay up (all night),” and “(一晩中)喋ってたい - I want to keep chatting (all night)” are used in place of “寝ていたい,” “起きていたい,” and “喋っていたい.” “…てたい” is colloquially spoken by both young and older people today, but to me it ...


4

tl;dr It is regional speaking, and former has emphasis on it where latter doesn't. Here's what I found. This wording can be found in 三河弁. Although this is spoken in Aichi, I (from Hyogo) do speak this sometimes. In this dialect, 〜や(あ)せん in the regular form is 〜や しない. So わかりゃあせん in regular form is わかりやしない. Now, わかりません vs わかりやしない(わかりやしません) is slightly ...


4

「ほめられるために、あんなに[努力]{どりょく}しなきゃなんない + の + も[大変]{たいへん}だね。」 As you said in Edit, 「しなきゃなんない」=「しなければならない」. The former is Kanto colloquial and the latter, Standard "dictionary" Japanese. The 「の」 that follows is a nominalizer. 「大変」, in this context, means "awful", "terrible", etc. Your TL of "difficult" is off here. "It's awful having to put in such great ...


4

“はったりにせよ おれたちをこいつらよばわりするたあ りっぱな度胸だぜ” can be translated as “Even if it’s only a bluff, you have a good nerve to call us ‘Hey, cubs!’” “たあ” is a colloquial and contracted form of “ …とは”, meaning “… is,” which is called “べらんめえ口調、” a local dialect in downtown areas of Tokyo and its environs. “たあ” is always suffixed to verbs such as “する,” “言う,” “聞く,” in such a ...


4

Yes, やんなっちゃう is short for いやになっちゃう, which is short for いやになってしまう. いやになる is a fixed phrase meaning "to be fed up / sick / disgusted". So やんなっちゃうなあ is something like "Now I'm starting to feel disgusted", "I can't help being sick".


4

じゃ is the contraction of では. It's a contraction, because じゃ is one mora (one unit length) and では is two moras long. じゃ is frequently used as contraction of では, especially in じゃない < ではない. As pointed out before by one of our native speakers on this site (@l'électeur), じゃありません is at risk of being overused by learners. Presumably, because the uncontracted では ...


3

Translating loosely: Matsusaka steak for me? Dear, don't bother about me. Don't bother shopping for me. Don't bother with Matsusaka beef. おかあさん literally means mother, but oftentimes you'll hear husbands (especially older ones) calling their wives おかあさん. To answer your questions: Yes 私はステーキなんていいから means something like "I don't need things such as ...


3

To start with the easiest part, 「わかんない」 is just the Kanto colloquial pronunciation of 「わからない」, and I will use the dictionary form in my explanation. It appears to me that you are thinking of the "other"「わからない」, which is the negative form of the verb 「わかる」, are you not? The 「わからない」 in the context in question needs to be understood and treated as an ...


3

It is short for うろついておる. It is called 二重母音の融合現象 (融合発音 synecphonesis).


3

「なっ」=「な」=「なあ」 Among those, 「なあ」 would be the "dictionary" form. This is an interjection that is often used to address a person or call someone's attention. One thing Japanese-learners should remember is that we only use this interjection with people who we know well and who are equals or below us in age and/or social status. You do not use it with your ...


2

As noted in the comment by strawberry jam, this is most likely a contraction of 食べていたい "want to be eating", the desiderative (wanting) form of 食べている "to be eating". In informal speech, it isn't uncommon for the い in various -ている forms to be contracted out: 行ってます, 話してた, 読んでる, etc. The contracted form of -ておく is -とく, where the て + お becomes と. Conjugated ...


2

「飾ってるの〜」 is a casual colloquialism of 「飾っているのです」. ~てる is short for ~ている (progressive form), denoting her habit in this context. Sentence-end の is common in casual girlish speech. Semantically, this is the same as other affirmative expressions like 「~のです」「~のだ」, or questions like 「~のですか」「~のか」, depending on the intonation. そうなの! That's it! 食べるの? Do (...


2

な is basically the same as ね in this context, and it basically just means "hey," or something you use to get someone's attention. A っ at the end of a word just means the last sound is dragged out a bit.


2

It is two verbs. You just had the two wrong verbs in mind. 落{お}としちまった is the colloquial form of 落{お}としてしまった, which in turn is comprised of the following two verbs: 落{お}として (て form): 落とす (jisho.org) しまった (past form): しまう (jisho.org) By slurring the pronunciation of てし, you end up with ち, hence 落{お}としてしまった→ 落{お}としちまった ちまう has its own dictionary entry here:...


2

ありっちゃあり is indeed a contraction of ありといえばあり and it's a way of saying "yeah, sure, why not...". As you say, it's completely parallel to おいしいといえばおいしい, just with あり (which means something like "something is possible/doable/acceptable/...").


2

The use of “ば” and “ば(あ)” like: その[辺]{へん}ば(あ)[練]{ね}り歩く - strut around over there 冗談ば(あ)[止]{や}めちょくれ。 - Stop joking. そげんこつば(あ)言いよって。[拳骨]{げんこつ}ば(あ)食らわすぞ。 - How can you dare to say that to me? I’ll give you a punch. is often observed in the north-western part (Fukuoka, Saga, and Nagasaki Prefectures) of Kyushu. It depends on the person and the ...


1

"祈り信じよ、さらば救われん" can be translated as “Pray and believe in (the God), and you shall be saved, not "Believe in your prayers, and you can be saved." ”救われん” is a passive, future form of 救う. …れん is an antiquated expression that can be used in such various ways as; 崇められる ⇒ 崇められん – will be worshipped. 褒められる ⇒ 褒められん – will be praised. 謗られる ⇒ 謗られん – will be ...


1

It is simply a contraction. (Well, I am not sure what word is phonologically correct. But, this change does not change its meaning.) We still use both expressions, but mainly left when it is pronounced. 音便 : https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E9%9F%B3%E4%BE%BF#.E6.92.A5.E9.9F.B3.E4.BE.BF


1

I find nothing wrong if someone gave a nickname いず to someone. いず happens to have the same sound as 出ず ("to exit"), 居ず ("absent"), and 伊豆 (province), but that won't be a problem. I don't think いず is very common as a nickname for いずみ, but there's at least one real person whose nickname is いず. I personally hear いずみん a lot (though it's not a contraction).



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