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In meaning, 「ものだから」=「ので」 and the two are interchangeable. Both express a reason or cause. I would recommend that you learn 「ものだから」 as a unit, but if you have to parse it, it is like this: 「もの」 is a dummy noun. It is needed to connect 「[刺]{さ}した」 and 「だ」grammatically.  「だ」 is an affirmation auxiliary verb. 「から」 is a conjunctive particle. Thus, ...


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You must be either reading too much into this or seeing something that is just not there, both of which could easily occur in foreign language study. When a sentence ends with 「~~からである」, it can only express a reason or cause for an event/situation that is described in the previous sentence(s) -- most often, in the sentence immediately before the one ending ...


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「どうも[人]{ひと}に[馬鹿]{ばか}にされていけない。[親]{おや}にまで馬鹿にされるからいけない」 The translation that your book gives you for the last half is: "And I particularly do not like being looked down on by my own father." In this case, the "particularly" part of the translation is NOT literal. It is, however, contextually clearly implied. The first half tells us that the ...


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Edit: How about reading it this way: 「[親にまで馬鹿にされるから]いけない。」 = 「親にまで馬鹿にされるからいやだ・馬鹿にされるのがいけない・いやだ。」 (Lit. It's no good since you're made a fool of even by your own parent. I hate it that I'm made a fool of even by my own parent.) It's saying 「[親にまで馬鹿にされるから](盲目は)いけない。」(Lit. I am looked down on even by my own parent, so being blind is not good.)


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There is no redundancy in this sentence -- none. If redundancy existed, that would be because you translated word for word by using a dictionary. It says 「でも、 そうかと[言]{い}って」; It does not say 「でも、しかし」, 「でも、それでも」 or 「しかし、それでも」, which would be redundant. How about "But even if that were the case"? 「そうかと言って」 is used to state a contrary idea/opinion while ...


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It's not. Don't take the translation of そうかと言って so literally. This link here states 3 optional translations for the word. Could be translated as "nevertheless", "and yet", etc. It actually might not qualify (maybe someone else can chime in) but think of it as an idiomatic expression. Also worth noting, in general, Japanese is far more forgiving about ...



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