Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

The word is nar-an, a negated form of the verb なる. The standard negation of the verb may be known to you as ならない. The utterance you ask about can be rephrased as 早く日曜日にならないかな.


0

They can be summarized like this: ( I=intransitive verb / T=transitive verb / TP=potential form of the transitive verb ) I: きこえる "can be heard" / T: きく "hear" / TP: きける "can hear" I: みえる "can be seen" / T: みる "see" / TP: (みられる or みれる) "can see" So this is the picture. However one point somewhat confusing is the (みられる or みれる) part, where lexically ...


-2

みえます Maybe, I think that your understanding is correct. みまられます The word "みまられます" is not. Did you mean "みられます" ? Can you show me an example sentence? きけます (= can listen) eg: あなたはストーリーをきけます。 You can listen to the story . きこえます (=hear) eg: 海の音がきこえます。 We can hear the ocean from here. 何か音がきこえますか? Do you hear any sound?


3

見える To be visible, to be in sight. あそこに高{たか}い山{やま}が見える。 A tall mountain can be seen over there. 僕{ぼく}にはあなたが見える。 You are visible to me / I can see you. to look like. 僕にはその雲{くも}がわたあめに見える。 That cloud looks like cotton candy to me. 見える is about objects being visible and not so much about one's ability to to see them. Obviously, if an ...


4

There is a way that ~もの can be applied to all verbs to "make them a noun", but it's not the way you're thinking of. If you have a verb (e.g. 走る【はしる】 "to run") and a noun (e.g. 人【ひと】 "person"), you can always take the dictionary form (辞書形【じしょけい】) of the verb and put it before the noun, to get a construction that means something like "[noun] that [verb]s" ...


7

Regarding the etymology of the "please" すみません, according to the gogen-allguide entry, it is 済みません, not 住みません. As to whether 住みません is used, it is, but not terribly commonly. Basically it's only used when you really want the future tense: 太郎と一緒に住みませんか? "Won't you live together with Tarou?" 今週より後に、この家には誰も住みません。 "After this week, no one will ...


2

住む often occurs in the 〜ている form in the wild to reflect a continuing state or condition. So then, if I wanted to say I don't live somewhere I would say (dictionary and polite): 東京に住んでいない / 東京に住んでいません。 or 東京に住んだことはない。 / 東京に住んだことはありません。 (I have not lived in Tokyo) The すみません of apologies is from 済む. But generally, it is not written in kanji. In ...


0

is it possible to interpret the plain/present affirmative of a verb as an action in progress/event currently taking place as well? Not really. There are several different patterns you can use depending on the situation. In general, you can use the pattern 〜つつある for something that is currently in progress. ドアが開いている → The door is open (in an open ...


-2

You can use 最中 ドア開いている最中にxxxxが起きた


3

The answer is basically no. You can express any progressive actions with (adverbal form) + つつある, which was created to translate exactly English progressive forms, though it's not frequently used in everyday conversation. Speaking how to translate the examples you suggested to common expressions, "My friend is going to Europe now":私の友達は今ヨーロッパへ向かっている "The ...



Top 50 recent answers are included