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2

I'm going to assume you mean yarimasu instead of arimasu. Arimasu comes from aru (to be). ある -> あり -> あります やる yaru conjugates to やります yarimasu. やあります in romaji is yaarimasu, which would be stretching the "a" sound for no reason. Masu-form conjugation simply involves changing the u hiragana to its i counterpart and then adding masu for godan verbs (yaru -> ...


2

Grammatically speaking, やあります is just plain wrong. It never conjugates to やあります. Such a spelling may be used when someone said やります with a strange intonation (like "I wiiil dooo it"), but it should be rare.


1

"~しに行く" = the 連用形(continuative form) of a verb + に行く and it means "go ~ing", so 見に行く = 見 (the 連用形 of 見る) + に行く. The "には" of "the 連体形(attributive form) of a verb + には" is used for the object of the action. For example, 車が走るには、ガソリンが必要です.


-1

Because it's 見るには and not verb + に + いく。They're completely different things. Verb + には is it's own thing. It means like 'in order to x / to accomplish x'. This is something that is extremely unintuitive at first but it makes a bit more sense when you think about how には is used with regards to physical objects. には is used to indicate that something is inside ...


4

仕事 is a noun and 仕事する is a verb. We have a lot of verbs like 仕事する where する is placed after a noun. And した is the past form of する. In addition, there are many verbs without する in Japanese. "I work" is translated as "仕事する" and "仕事をする". And "仕事はする" means "I work" and this "は" is used for emphasis and contrast. Same goes with 勉強する.


1

For any verbs that use する, yes, that is how you indicate an action in the past. Although you don't use は in the middle like that. It is just 勉強した。 Verbs are very regular in the Japanese language so in my opinion verbs in Japanese are quite straightforward to learn. There are about ~100 ways you can conjugate する but for a list of 50 most common was you can ...


2

私が困っているのが発音ですね can be translated as “What I’m troubled with is pronunciation,” in short, “My problem (weak point) is pronunciation.” You can replace “のが” with “のは” to mean “What I’m troubled / My problem is.” は and が is a postpositional particle to link the subject, 私が困っている - What I'm troubled with to predicate, 発音です. のが(のは)can be used for examples: ...


3

私が困っているのは is translated " what I am worrying about is" and this "の" is used in a nominalization of a sentence and verbs and so on. For example, "私が勉強しているのは、大学に行くためです"、"走るのが嫌いです"、"悲しいのが嫌です". And 私が困る of this sentence is that わたし is subject and 困る is predicate, so が is used because に isn't set behind a subject. In addition, if you want to use "に", you say ...


7

Well, it appears to me that you're confused with the transitivity of 止まる. While the English word "stop" is used both transitively (as in "I stopped the taxi.") and intransitively (as in "Then the taxi stopped."), 止まる is always intransitive. The transitive version is 止める, and its potential form is 止められる. So 俺は止まらない just means "I don't stop" or "I will never ...


1

吸わ(未然形 of verb 吸う) + ない(auxiliary verb which means "negative") + ように(連用形 of auxiliary verb ようだ which means "analogy" + し(連用形 of verb する) + て(postpositional particle) + い(連用形 of subsidiary verb いる) + ます(auxiliary verb which means "politeness") And て + いる is used together as one word ている.


3

生きていこう = 生き(the 連用形/continuative form of the verb 生きる) + て(a 接続助詞/conjunctive particle) + いこ(the 未然形/imperfective form of the subsidiary verb いく) + う(a verbal auxiliary which means "will").


0

生きる + いく so(生きる -> 生きて)+ (いく -> いこう)


6

This is the [命令形]{めい・れい・けい} - imperative form. It translates more like O dream boat, go/move on to the shore of tomorrow Which is almost what you have. The difference is that the singer is addressing the boat (夢の船よ), not saying "go on" the boat.


2

Let's talk about the imperative in Japanese: an imperative is a way to give orders and/or commands. However, the form of these utterances decides whether they are humble requests to barked orders. You can find a quite complete reference here In general you can use a number of forms: ます-stem+なさい: this is a polite yet firm request. It is often used to ...


0

Choco's right but being pedantic ;) ~て form is often used as a casual direct request/command. ドア開けて!早く飲んで! Adding くれ!makes it very powerful, impatient, angry, desperate or comic. ~なさい is more how you would politely but strongly address/command/request a child or 'lower' person. You could also see it as one step down in formality from ください。 Like many ...


2

In your case, you are asking about a specific construct: the use of purposeに+verb of movement To express: Going somewhere to do something This pattern can take two kinds of objects as purpose: The ~ます stem of a verb: "Going somewhere to verb'. Note that is similar to nominalizing the verb, see for example this question. A noun: "Going ...


1

[verb in masu-form + に行く] essentially means go to {place} to do {verb} So, in this case : おじいさんは山に行く。 The old man is going to the mountain 何故山に行くのか? Why is he going to the mountain? 木を切りに行く。 He's going to chop wood Does that make things a little clearer?


5

「ありまして」is just a really polite form of 「あって」. In the standard polite sentence, only the final verb is put into the polite -ます form, while the rest are in the regular dictionary forms: 朝ご飯を食べてシャワーを浴びました。 While often overkill, it is possible to put the other connecting verbs into the -ます form as well. The resulting「まして」form has the same function as the ...



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