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1

って is a casual form of the "quotation" particle と. しろ is the imperative form of the verb する. So the two are completely separate in terms of conjugation (i.e. しろって is not a "form" of the verb する, but a verb with a particle attached). The reason they are adjacent in the sentence is because someone is asking what someone said, so the quotation particle is ...


4

「ろうそくが[置]{お}かれている。」 does not really mean "Candles are placed." as you stated. That would be 「ろうそくが置かれる。」. 「ろうそくが置かれている。」 can mean two different but related things. Passive Voice + Present Progress: "Candles are being placed." ← Someone is in the middle of placing candles. Passive Voice + State: "Candles have been placed." ← Candles were placed some ...


1

ない behaves like an i-adjective. You may end up with some strange sentences (雪子さんとはデートできないだけです, but you can turn water into wine) but grammatically you can do what you are suggesting.


6

To break it down, はじめまして is the て form of はじめます, and はじめます is the polite form of はじめる. はじめまして is a fixed expression. You'll see ~~まして in some fixed expressions such as: あけましておめでとうございます。-- Happy new year. どういたしまして。-- You are welcome. as well as in polite/formal speech or writing such as: ご来店くださいまして、誠にありがとうございます。 -- Thank you for ...



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