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7

Regarding the etymology of the "please" すみません, according to the gogen-allguide entry, it is 済みません, not 住みません. As to whether 住みません is used, it is, but not terribly commonly. Basically it's only used when you really want the future tense: 太郎と一緒に住みませんか? "Won't you live together with Tarou?" 今週より後に、この家には誰も住みません。 "After this week, no one will ...


3

There is a way that ~もの can be applied to all verbs to "make them a noun", but it's not the way you're thinking of. If you have a verb (e.g. 走る【はしる】 "to run") and a noun (e.g. 人【ひと】 "person"), you can always take the dictionary form (辞書形【じしょけい】) of the verb and put it before the noun, to get a construction that means something like "[noun] that [verb]s" ...


2

住む often occurs in the 〜ている form in the wild to reflect a continuing state or condition. So then, if I wanted to say I don't live somewhere I would say (dictionary and polite): 東京に住んでいない / 東京に住んでいません。 or 東京に住んだことはない。 / 東京に住んだことはありません。 (I have not lived in Tokyo) The すみません of apologies is from 済む. But generally, it is not written in kanji. In ...


2

The answer is basically no. You can express any progressive actions with (adverbal form) + つつある, which was created to translate exactly English progressive forms, though it's not frequently used in everyday conversation. Speaking how to translate the examples you suggested to common expressions, "My friend is going to Europe now":私の友達は今ヨーロッパへ向かっている "The ...



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