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25

It's perfectly fine to use only half-width arabic numbers. 2009年6月30日 However, there are other rules in operation, coming from various time in the history of writing and printing: A. Don't use arabic numbers at all - maybe seen in formal documents: 二千九年六月三十日 B. Half-width for two-digit numbers, otherwise full-width - mostly in printed materials: ...


14

As far as Internet slang goes, the word 豆腐{とうふ} is often used as a term for replacement glyphs because of their rectangular shapes, and 豆腐[化]{ば}け or 豆腐[化]{か} describe the phenomenon in one word. 画面上の日本語がすべて豆腐になってしまっていて読めない フォント設定を変更しても豆腐化けが直らない


12

It is read as めい. “ユーザ名” is read as ユーザめい, “Skype 名” is スカイプめい. I do not know the reason for that, but if I make a guess, this may be because gairaigo in a compound word is treated in a similar way to Sino-Japanese words.


10

I'm not sure how common it is in general business Japanese, but 割り込みタスク isn't that out of place among lifehackers. It roughly means "unexpected work created by external factors". Here are a few articles that use the word... 「バッファ時間」で割り込みタスクをやっつける タスクシュート方式における割り込みタスク 割り込みタスクに四苦”ハック” In lifehacking jargon, "interruptions" seems to be the corresponding ...


9

If you look at menus in programs such as Open Office, words such as "編集" for 'edit', "挿入" for 'insert', and "設定" for 'configure' (or rather, configuration) all are nouns, but can be made verbs by adding the verb "する" as in "記録する" for 'save' (file, etc.). A case where you might use a dictionary form of a verb to describe the ACTION could be for 'open' (a ...


8

It is still a case of 文字化け. 文字化け means the phenomenon where characters are shown incorrectly on computers, and its cause is not necessarily a mismatch of character encodings. I do not know a specific term for the kind of 文字化け which you are talking about. I would say something along フォントが足りないことによって起きる文字化け. By the way, the glyphs used in this situation are ...


8

I agree with Matt that there's no fixed standard about which romanization scheme to use. My guess is that it depends on the project, author, term and the author's swing of mood at the moment, just as in any other context of Japanese romanization. [Personal point-of-view] If I were to use a Japanese variable name, I'd use Hepburn-style romanization, because ...


7

囲み文字 are derived from Edo period corporate logos called 表号 which were one of the standard ways of naming or identifying a shop (屋号). You may see in the countryside some companies identify themselves with logos that look like hats or carpenter's squares. There is a good survey of traditional logos from one town here: http://www.kokuhei.com/sa-ken/hyogo.htm ...


7

I am not sure if there is any rule either (sounds like too recent a problem to have a strong tradition attached to it), but I thought this comment made (on the original Stack Overflow) by a native Japanese was interesting: I'm a Japanese, and I loathe full width numerals! Please just use the half-width numerals within Japanese sentences. All you ...


7

Although it looks odd if you mix it, but I don't think there is rules for that. But some web forms only allow 半角 on phone numbers, and some only allow 全角 for Address, so you may need to force one on those places.


7

EDICT (which is the corpus JquickTrans apparently uses) has several special dictionaries for technical terms. The "Computing/Telecomms" dictionary includes such wonderful words as: 変数設定 【へんすうせってい】 (n) variable initialization 参照渡し 【さんしょうわたし】 (n) call by reference オブジェクト[指向]{しこう}プログラミング (n) object-oriented programming


7

They both can mean the same thing but they are not the same. Probably a similar problem to 目標 and 目的. The main difference to me is the point of view. User's point of view => 要求 Dev's point of view => 要件 要求 would be functionalities the user is looking for. While 要件 would be functionalities the system need to do to answer the 要求. In my company, we first ...


7

Given that the format 0x[0-9A-F] is baked into nearly every modern computer language, there aren't any other options for representing them in text. But there is still the question of pronouncing them. I suspect the answer will depend on the individual company culture to some extent. At our company, the digits are pronounced in Japanese: ぜろ、いち、に... and the ...


5

I'm a programmer at a Japanese company, and all of our variable names are named in English. Sometimes it's misspelled or unclear English, but it's English nonetheless. It's just the standard. Heck, most programming languages don't even support non-ASCII variable names, and romaji variable names are unwieldy and unnecessary. Of course, it all comes down to ...


5

デッキ as a deck of cards is not established among the general people. I guess only people who are particularly related to playing cards, RPG cards, or magicians may use it in that way. For most other people, デッキ will primarily mean 'cassette deck', or the meanings rintaun mentions, or as part of a noun compound デッキチェアー 'deck chair'. 単語帳 particularly means ...


5

I don't really think it matters. And even in your image, the full-width numeral is used only to take up the same amount of space as the pair of half-width numerals next to it.


5

According to Microsoft Language Portal, they call it “wait cursor” in English and “待機カーソル” in Japanese in the documentation for Visual Studio 2008 SP1, 2010, and 2012. I am not sure how popular this term is among users.


5

This isn't a 100% sure answer based on experience, but a little investigation leads me to believe that in the IT context these two words are synonymous. Here we see both ユーザー要件 and ユーザー要求 Here we see both used for system requirements. It's also written here as 必要最小システム構成 for "minimum system requirements." Here we see "requirement gathering" simply stated ...


5

A natural way of asking that would be: 「ファイルのサイズを[教]{おし}えてください。」 If it is for business, one could say: 「ファイルのサイズをお教えいただけますか。」 The problem with 「サイズは[何]{なん}ですか?」 is that while it is a perfectly grammatical sentence, it sounds like it was "translated" from anothet language, which it was. When I read that part, it reminded me of the sentence ...


4

It is a little bit informal, but the language site that I always use to look up some word in Japanese is alc.co.jp It uses the Eijiro dictionary, and has pretty good coverage on many subjects. Hope this helps.


4

This is the prefix 直{じか} ("direct"), plus 打{う}ち, a noun form of the verb 打つ ("to hit"), which in this case refers to typing ("hitting" keys). Although I couldn't find a dictionary entry for this exact term, it's described in the entry for IP直打ち in the IT用語辞典 on Weblio, which confirms that the reading is じかうち. This page also confirms that it means ...


4

You would be better off using the 日. The same in other language, without unit the number does not mean anything.


4

From what I can gather, this shirt appears to be made somewhere other than in Japan, as the top and bottom line of characters mean nothing intelligible (unless you start making up your own meanings for each section of the random list of characters.) The middle line is closer to something that makes sense, and it almost reads: Sapporo Beer. (But the ...


4

I don't think that there is an absolute industry standard ("programmers" can't even agree on the best way of indenting code...), but in my admittedly limited experience, Word-processor-style, influenced by Nihon-shiki, is most common. Thus, 東京 is "toukyou" and "情報" is "zyouhou", "普通" is "hutuu". Pure speculation: This might be because if you romanize things ...


4

I always use half width for numbers and letters for purposes of compatibility. Not everything can handle double-byte characters. As for a matter of style, I like to use something crazy like the numbers in circles (①, ②, ③...) or the old style kanji (壱、弐、参...) for effect (if I'm trying to draw attention, like on ニコニコ動画 or something).


4

Always use 行 (ぎょう) for the lines (in a book chapter, a programming code, etc.), no matter whether the sentence is written horizontally (横書き) or vertically (縦書き). For example, "Removing three lines from the CSS file" is as follows: CSSファイルから3行抜く


4

This decorative frame can be called 飾り罫 (かざりけい). 飾り罫 can be text-based or not, it means any kind of dingbat-style framing in general.


3

I think you misheard 割り込みタスク. 割り込みタスク or interrupting task is a technical term used in computer science: wikipedia. Although it is a technical term, its meaning does not differ much from what you can imagine if it were an ordinary phrase. I think your coworker has some knowledge about computers, and used it metaphorically. Other than as a technical term, the ...


3

You present four choices: I don't think you should use コメントアウトする to mean "uncomment". It properly means "comment out", but unfortunately, the meaning may not be obvious unless you're familiar with the English term. It has caused confusion in the past, so if I used the term at all, I'd be prepared to clarify by saying either コメントにする or コメントにして無視されるようにする. ...


3

I have been using JquickTrans dictionary software for years (had to pay $15 before but it's freeware now), and it has a few specialized dictionary catalogs that could be useful to find science and math terms:



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