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6

This happens a lot in patent translations, so you might get some hints by searching for these terms: 特許 請求項 翻訳 This site has this example: A dynamic random access memory including at least two banks, each of said banks including memory cells arranged in rows and columns, said memory cells storing data provided by at least one bit line and by at ...


5

In the famicom/NES era, kanji was not available, and many games used some spaces between phrases. Spaces are usually inserted before nouns and verbs, but not before particles. With the aid of spaces Japanese adults can understand kana-only sentences easily, just like in English. Actually native speakers can even read this broken kana-only passage very ...


4

I would think it would be ok though they sometime use pronunciations that are easier for kids to understand, informal japanese, and words typically used by kids. I'm not quite sure what your level is, but watching Love (renai) dramas with japanese subtitles would be my recommendation to improve your listening. Another option is what is called Shadow ...


4

Well, the extended question I wanted to ask was more along the lines of "At what age does the Japanese population comprehend and utilize Yojijukugo?" In a broad sense, keep in mind that "Yojijukugo" can refer to any 4 letter compound word. For example, [天気予報]{てんきよほう} and [高速道路]{こうそくどうろ} are "Yojijukugo". However, I'm assuming that you mean "Yojijukugo" ...


2

肩を[怒]{いか}らせる = square one's shoulders He squared his shoulders under the uniform. You could see that he was gathering his strength from the shape of his squared, raised shoulders. [軍服]{ぐんぷく}の[怒]{いか}った[肩]{かた} ≒ 軍服の[下]{した}の怒った肩 or 軍服を着た、怒った肩 = his squared shoulders under the uniform


2

I don't see anything wrong with solution 1, but not because it makes it easier for the speaker. Breaking up complex ideas also makes things easier for the listener to digest, piece by piece. Of course it's ridiculous to take it to the level of "Here's this. Here's that. That relates to this in a certain way. . . ad nauseam". But you can and probably should ...


2

If you work through a textbook, the vocabulary you need should be built up from the ground. Once you know some sentence structure, this should be enough to figure out word boundaries in elementary picture books, which allows you to look up words in any dictionary. Some books for pre-school children actually do put spaces between words for better ...


1

I agree with Earthliŋ's answer, particularly about looking for books with spaces between words, but I'd like to add a few more thoughts and point out some specific issues. There are different levels books aimed for very young children. First there are baby books, for children who are just learning words. These will usually just have one or two words with ...


1

逢魔が刻 is a fixed expression, "time of disaster" or some such, according to a meaning listed in the post which this question is a duplicate of.



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