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23

This question frequently comes up among foreigners in Japan, especially men, as it seems there's a feeling that sticking with 私{わたし} is somehow too "textbook". It's as if using 私{わたし} is an indication of still learning, or perhaps not yet having been integrated into Japanese language and culture enough. Men often wonder if they should use 僕{ぼく}, or 俺{おれ} ...


23

Atashi is for females. Chicchai can be seen as more emphatic "tiny". They are both quite common. Remember that in most textbooks for any language the most ideal form of the language (often judged so by prescriptive grammarians) is taught. As you familiarize yourself with real world usage (through travel, friends, and media) you will discover all sorts of ...


19

but I am constantly baffled by why certain loan words from English are constructed using certain katakana sounds. Loan words do not necessarily need to be borrowed from English. In fact, most old loan words (in the 外来語 sense) were borrowed from Portuguese. For example, if someone asked me to say "energy" in Japanese, I would have guessed エナジー or ...


16

Your two examples are incorrect in the “standard” dialect. Some dialects (such as the Gunma dialect and the Saitama dialect) use ん instead of の in a question as in your first example. The second example may also be used in some dialects.


14

Unfortunately, it is unlikely that these Japanese letters have anything to do with summer. These are mascots of Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd., a company run by Takashi Murakami, the artist who painted this Google Doodle. Also note that the same mascots appear in the Winter Solstice Doodle, too.


14

It's not clear exactly who or what started it on twitter, but なう does indeed come from the English "now". It became popular in 2009, shortly after the release of twitter (according to this site). Here are some Japanese articles exploring the usage: http://nanapi.jp/258/ http://zokugo-dict.com/21na/nau.htm http://www.paradisearmy.com/doujin/pasok_now.htm


12

をば is basically the particles を + は combined together. It works like を but places extra emphasis on the object (in theory; in practice this "extra emphasis" might be diluted so that it basically just signals formal style). So this sort of をば works like the を in "ご協力を!" (as a complete utterance) -- there is an action implied, but the actual verb is left ...


10

1) It is "やってもうた" or "やってしもた". 2) The form "もうた" or "しもた" are shortened forms of "しもうた". The (auxiliary) verb "しまう" has a stem ending with the glide "w": "simaw-", and underwent different developments in Kansai and Kantoo regarding inflection. In Kantoo, the "w" was interpreted as a consonant, and was used to trigger gemination (a.k.a. [促]{そく}[音]{おん}[便]{びん}) ...


9

Chakoshi to the rescue! (Chakoshi is a tool for searching both the Aozora and conversational Japanese corpora at Nagoya University.) A quick search for a "[noun]ん[noun]" pattern in the conversational corpus gives 262 results, most of which are what you are asking about. Broken down, there's actually not much variety in the nouns that follow ん: とき (99): ...


9

There's no such word as あたたかった/あったかった at least in standard Japanese...^^ You'd surely be corrected if you wrote あたたかった in your essay or written test in primary school. You wouldn't find あったかった in children's books, too. I believe it's just a typo and doubt people (who speak Kanto or Kansai dialect at least) really use it in normal or casual conversations. ...


9

The second paragraph can be answered in large part by What changes are made to the pronunciation of gairaigo? and by Less-approximate and more-approximate forms of loan words and by Different transcriptions for words with related origin . As for the third paragraph, Wikipedia says the Agency for Cultural Affairs (文化庁) at the Ministry of Education of Japan ...


9

I do not know if さっき食べたじゃない is grammatically correct or not, but sentence + じゃない is a common colloquial construct whose meaning is similar to a tag question as Amanda wrote: “You ate it a little while ago, didn’t you?” It is a statement rather than a question, and the じゃない part indicates either that the speaker is surprised by the fact that he/she has to ...


9

Less aggressive / forceful and more matter-of-factly way of saying "What's it to you?", "None of your business" There are several strategies for countering an invasion of your private matters, as you can see from this conceptual diagram: my idea of "private matters" ------------------> A me | you ...


9

There are lots of second person pronouns in Japanese, and of course, there are occasions where you are supposed to use them. I think the reason your teacher advised you to avoid using them at the beginning is not because you are not supposed to use them but because it will be difficult for a beginner to pick up the right one. Rather than making a wild guess ...


9

That's correct. ゲーマー is the word that is generally used.


9

As rintaun says, ゲーマー is the most general term for "some one who plays video games". In its narrower sense, when describing a person, it can mean a "hardcore gamer" as opposed to just ゲーム好き (げーむずき, casual gamer). For example, if someone wants to say she's just a casual gamer, she might say things like ゲーム好きだけど、ゲーマーじゃありません。 If you need to differentiate ...


8

The タ-verb (plain past) form + って pattern is most similar, if not identical, to the ~ても pattern: そんなこと言ったってしょうがない。(=そんなこと言ってもしょうがない。) It doesn't help matters to say things like that. 名前を変えたって基本的な問題はそう簡単に消えてくれない。(=名前を変えても基本的な問題はそう簡単に消えてくれない。) Even if you change the name, the fundamental problem won't disappear so easily. This construction is mostly ...


8

I think that modern common sense would assume that men at kon'yoku who wait for women to come would be similar to the crocodile who quietly waits for their prey. However, while easily understandable, think that is folk etymology. The term is used outside of hot springs as well. Also, you need to remember that crocodiles originally did not originally habitat ...


8

It's a shortening of って言うの! or って言っているの! and shows some irritation on the part of the speaker. "What I'm telling you is . . .!" There's some good explanations here: http://oshiete.goo.ne.jp/qa/1847367.html


8

As you say, ねー is a (very) informal, rather masculine, way of replacing ない at the end of words. Works for both verbs: 行かない → 行かねー and い-adjectives (which are kind-of-verbs anyway, but let's not get into that debate here): 危ない【あぶない】→ アブねー in fact it also works with other "-a" kanas. E.g: ヤバい → ヤベー Adding のだ/んだ as you do in your example is only ...


8

I hear 「まだ見ていない。」, which seems entirely normal, comparable to the English construction "I still haven't seen it." => "I'm in a still-continuing state of not seeing it." I suppose there's some element of volition here; it's still possible for her to see it if she wants to. For example, if a pterodactyl flew overhead, and you missed seeing it, you would say ...


8

As a Phenomena of Fast/Casual Speech As Tsujimura(2007) describes, this a non-mandatory phonological process (not a syntactical one) called nasal syllabification. Consider these examples and a non-example as they might be written in native orthography: 来るのなら → 来るんなら 君のうち → 君んち しらない → しんない かえらない → かえんない おくらない → おくんない 学者になる → 学者んなる 僕のうち → ...


8

あー、うーむ、うーん、うーんと、えー、えーっと、えーと、そのう、ふうむ、んー, etc. I am sure there are more.


7

if you wanted to end with just ん without the です you should probably just use the informal of んです which is の 明日学校にいくの? 明日学校に行かないと思う、、、風邪引いたの。 ん like tsuyoshi said, is a dialect version of の seen in various regions of Japan. While it doesn't seem to be used in Aichi, all of my co-workers know of it. So it could be said that you can use it and you will be ...


7

あたし is quite common for females, but 僕 is not that much. In my feeling, 僕 has some romantic sense, so using 僕 when you talk to girls should be no problem at all. (Note that I use romatic sense here is for non-family members, and non-closed friends) Japanese use 俺 a lot recently, and here is a report about usage about 僕 and 俺 第1期 - 1895~1935, 第2期 - ...


7

I honestly don't think there's any way to answer this given the condition that it should be polite, even with Japanese's overgrown arsenal of euphemisms and niceties. I can't think of one in English either; probably because any insinuation of the sentiment "get lost" is universally obvious. But depending on the situation, you might be able to get away with ...


7

をば is a classical particular used for particularly strong emphasis. I'm guessing something like drum roll "And now, setting the stage for our Really Big Shoe, . . ." (edit) - On second thought, Ed Sullivan is maybe a little anachronistic for Classical Japanese. Maybe more like "Forsooth!" or whatnot. 笑


7

The first thing to understand here is that じゃん forms a tag question, so it's entirely different than the negative form: このゲームは楽しい。 This game is fun. このゲームは楽しいじゃん。 This game is fun, isn't it? このゲームは楽しくない。 This game isn't fun. このゲームは楽しくないじゃん。 This game isn't fun, is it? じゃん is an informal version of じゃない; this use of じゃない as a tag question ...


7

The なう that you hear in the Bus announcements is actually "なお" meaning "furthermore" or "in addition". If I recall correctly, it is often used in the part of the announcement that is describing the locations near the next stop.


7

I was just now idly browsing through saiga-jp.com and stumbled upon: 大きなお世話だ(おおきなおせわだ) / This is none of your business., Never you mind.



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