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8

Please note that the nature of writing using Chinese script often makes it impossible to know how the word was originally pronounced. Generally the only real way of knowing is by having glosses written in kana. In Old Japanese, neither hiragana nor katakana were yet invented, though man'yoogana does indicate the pronunciation. That said, I can only find ...


6

I don't know if @l'électeur's comments were rhetorical or otherwise, but I only find the poem as 若葉 (not 落葉) and written by 蕪村 (not 芭蕉). Here's a more reliable reference from 青空文庫 蕪村には直ちに若葉を詠じたるもの十余句あり。皆若葉の趣味を発揮せり。例、 [...] をちこちに滝の音聞く若葉かな [...] It might not be relevant any longer, but the historical spelling for the お in おちる was just お, and not ...


5

Actually 邪 has a long history of being used for its sound alone, going back at least to the Warring States Shakespeare, Zhuangzi: 天之蒼蒼、其正色邪。其遠而無所至極邪。 The sky looks very blue. Is that its real color, or is it because it is so far away and has no end? [tr. Burton Watson] Here the character 邪 is twice used simply to represent the sound of asking a ...


3

"Does anyone know what to call the outdated, high form of language which will say for example "ならぬ" rather than "ならない" or more accurately "だめだ"?" We call it 「[文語体]{ぶんごたい}」 or 「文語[調]{ちょう}」("Literal style") as opposed to 「[口語体]{こうごたい}」 or 「口語調」 ("Colloquial style"). "Specifically, I would like to know if there is a name for the dialect used by Kuchiki ...


2

In classical Japanese, "~ぞ + 連体形" and "~こそ + 已然形" are the patterns which basically emphasize the sentences. This grammatical rule is known as 係り結び. To put it simply, when ~ぞ or ~こそ appears in the middle of a sentence, that sentence have to end with 連体形 or 已然形 (of a verb/adjective), respectively. 雪降りけり。 (終止形) 雪ぞ降りける。 (ぞ + 連体形) 雪こそ降りけれ。 (こそ + 已然形) ...


2

Early stages of Japanese did not have relative clauses, but it was possible to modify nouns with attributive verbs (using contemporary lexicon/morphology for ease): 咲く丘 a hill where something grows I believe that from early stages, there was little restriction on the semantic role of 丘 in the action of 咲く, i.e. all this is really saying is "a hill that ...


2

案ずるより: rather than worrying 案ずる: to worry (archaic version of 案じる) ~より: than ~ 産むが: bearing (a baby) (is) 産む: to bear (a baby) が: (subject marker) 易し: easy (archaic version of 易しい) Since this is a proverb, 産む here is used to figuratively mean "to actually do something".


1

~くれ The word, くれ, is a special word. The original form of this is くれる (呉れる) and the imperative form is くれろ, while it's a deprecated expression. According to Daijirin: 〔命令形は「くれ」が普通〕 その動作者{どうさしゃ}が話{はな}し手{て}または話題{わだい}の人物{じんぶつ}のために何{なん}らかの動作{どうさ}をすることを表{あらわ}す (Translation: [くれ is general in imperative form] This means that the hearer do ...


1

I'm not really for the suggested translation, so I'm going to translate it myself. Although other people and I will be gone, the events in the songs will remain. Even if time shifts and things leave, (even if) delights and sorrows come and go, (how could I deny) that the characters of this song will be there If the threads of green willows never ...



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