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9

It's a question somehow unanswered for a fairly long time, while it doesn't seem to be too complicated to answer. If I am reading a Chinese text to a Japanese audience, how can I know which reading to use for each character? Of the 音読み, there can be 呉音, 漢音, and 唐音 to choose from. There are two major types of situation to read Classical Chinese text in ...


6

In the dictionary 字通【じつう】 (1996), we find: [3] よく温熟する、ならう、たずねる。 In addition, the dictionary 類聚名義抄【るいじゅみょうぎしょう】 (approx. 12th century) lists* the following meanings for 温: アタゝム・タツヌ・ウルフ・ツゝム・シル・アタゝカナリ・ウツクシ・ヤハラカナリ 尋【たず】ねる (or rather, タツヌ) is the second listed. Moving on now to Chinese sources, in 漢典, it is written: (2) 复习 [review] ...


6

Since I have no knowledge of the subject, I am quoting from an academic paper: 日本・中国・台湾・香港の基礎漢字1945字字体一覧表の作成に向けて (香港中文大学日本研究学科、Senior Instructor、兒島慶治) According to the author of this paper, the number is 1,165. (See page 4.) Note that there were 1,945 [常用漢字]{じょうようかんじ} when this paper was written. Currently, that number has increased to 2,136. So, the ...


4

Yes, 黒 is the 新字体{しんじたい} (simplified) form of 黑, which took the two dots at the top and turned them into a straight line. The same simplification can be seen in 曾 -> 曽. This was all part of the 1945 simplification scheme in Japanese. 黑 is still used in chinese though, both simplified and traditional, and has the exact same meaning of "black", as you pointed ...


4

予 in Japanese is also a simplified version of 豫. 猶予 corresponds to Mandarin 犹豫. http://ja.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E4%BA%88


3

This question could probably be answered on different levels, but here is what you might want to know for starters because that is what I, an average Japanese-speaker, know. The key word here is phonetics, not orthography. [大和言葉]{やまとことば} are the words that existed when Japanese was only a spoken language. Sounds were everything we had to express ...


2

I assume you're referring to the Baxter-Sagart Middle Chinese transcriptions of the Qieyun rime dictionary. When I search these transcriptions for 洗, I find two readings listed: *sejX, corresponding to modern Mandarin xǐ, Japanese セイ・サイ, and Korean 세 se *senX, corresponding to modern Mandarin xiǎn, Japanese セン, and Korean 선 seon So I think the final ...


2

According to Pulleyblank's Lexicon of Reconstructed Pronunciation (http://books.google.com/books?id=qWGIxP1R4P4C, p336), there's a reconstructed EMC pronunciation of 洗 as *sɛn' (no idea what the apostrophe means, though - glottal stop?). This apparently corresponds to a modern Mandarin pronunciation of xiǎn, which also has a nasal final. There may also be a ...


1

In short, yes, it's likely to be helpful. There is, however, a caveat: 汉字 and 漢字 are different, sometimes subtly, sometimes not. While their meaning tends to line up more or less perfectly, you do come across nuances in meaning and usage. Pronunciation differences between 普通话 and 音読み are rife, but somewhat regular. Furthermore, 汉字 are different from 漢字 ...



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