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10

Using the terms from snailboat's link: Not [force doing] He didn't have me wash the dishes (but I washed them because I was bored). Similar to → He did not force me to wash the dishes. Force [not doing] He had me not wash the dishes (because I'm really clumsy). Similar to → He forced me to not wash the dishes. Verbs in the form 〜せなかった/〜せませんでした are ...


8

…を幸せにする means “to make … happy.” させる is the causative form of する. Therefore: AがBを幸せにする: A makes B happy. XがAにBを幸せにさせる: X makes A make B happy. However, some people may confuse these two and say 幸せにさせる when they mean 幸せにする.


8

Technically, it exists, but as a Japanese-speaker, I would NOT recommend that you actively use it --- at least not on a regular basis. As @Chocolate stated in the comment above, 「~~させられうる」 is the form. Your sentence “It is possible that she may make you eat her cooking.” can be said in Japanese as: 「ボクは[彼女]{かのじょ}に[自分]{じぶん}の[料理]{りょうり}を[食]{た}べさせられうる。」 ...


7

I don't know what you mean by "-せる" form. -せる can appear at the end of the verb in at least two ways. As the potential form of a verb, which ends in -す. 帰す -> 帰せる As the causative form of a verb. 帰る -> 帰らせる Here, -せる is the potential form of the verb 倒す, so 倒す "to throw over, to knock down" 倒せる "to be able to throw over / knock down" 倒せない "not ...


6

Both 両親は私を医者にならせたがっています and 両親は私に医者になって欲しがっています are grammatically correct, but in practice, people don't say either. I'd recommend, as seafood258 says, 両親は私が医者になることを望んでいる or, if you ignore minor difference, …医者にならせたいようだ / …医者になってほしいようだ.


6

Direct translation of "He had me not wash the dishes." is, as you wrote "彼は私に皿を洗わせませんでした。". That is correct. But it's bit awkward for me, I real situation he stopped me to wash dishes because I wanted to wash. That was indicated, isn't it? For me "彼は私に皿を洗わせてくれませんでした。" sounds more natural.


6

No, it is not correct, sorry to say. You literally created a "double causative" in: 「[食]{た}べさせることをさせないで」 But we would not use this structure in a natural setting. It sounds quite wordy and awkward. Most naturally, we would say something like: 「おばあさんに、子どもたちにオクラを食べさせないようにしてね( or しようね)。」 For more clarity, one could insert 「[無理]{むり}に」= "forcibly" ...


6

First up I'll have to equate a few terms to avoid confusion. I'm going to equate your concept of "instigator" with "causer". And your concept of "agent" as "causee" (1) If I use 行く with another verb as its purpose, is を available to mark the agent? It seems like this should be the case since お弁当を should be connected to 行く。 Compare: [a] ...


6

子供を本を読ませる is ungrammatical, and you have to say 子供に本を読ませる. Here are the basic rules for causation: For verbs which take を, the agent (or "causee") is marked with に. Such verbs are usually transitive verbs, but some intransitive verbs take を, too. For verbs which don't take を (i.e., most intransitive verbs), the agent is marked with を. In your question, ...


5

「[子供]{こども}に[話]{はなし}を[聞]{き}かせてあげました。」 Does this sentence seem natural to a native Japanese speaker? Yes, it is perfectly natural, correct, grammatical, etc. It has no problem whatsoever on any level. No one was forced to either tell or listen to a story, either. No stress or pressure on either party is implied in the sentence. It simply says ...


5

It's a different way of saying the causative-passive 行かせられる, so it means that the speaker was made to go to the hospital. Note in an earlier version of this answer I confidently asserted that this is a more colloquial example. A comment was posted to the contrary and, after researching it more in depth, I was surprised to find I was indeed wrong in that ...


4

Does this help to illustrate the difference? "Unfortunate" タコに食べられた。 I was swallowed by an octopus. "Not so serious" タコを食べさせられた。 Someone made me eat octopus. "Unlikely" タコに食べさせられた。 An octopus (spoon-)fed me.


4

「~~させ (causative verb form) + て + いただく」 expresses receiving the permission (or opportunity) to perform an action from another person. 「いただく」 = 「もらう」 in meaning. Former is only politer than the latter. 「[取]{と}らせていただいた」 means "I/We received the permission to take/collect ~~." One could also use as a translation "I/We had the pleasure of ...


4

構【かま】う (= "care about", "mind", "worry about") can be used in the forms of both "~に構う" (intransitively) and "~を構う" (transitively). For example, you can both say 「俺はお前に構っている暇がない」 and 「俺はお前を構っている暇がない」, and they're semantically the same! According to BCCWJ Corpus, "~に構う" is roughly three times more common than "~を構う". You seem to know how to make causative ...


4

Sometimes, one needs to take a statement by Tae Kim with a grain of salt. Kim probably knows better than 99.9 % of all Japanese-learners, but still he is not a native speaker. The short form is indeed used quite heavily in informal, daily conversations among us native speakers. The more informal the speech, the more often you will hear the short form. ...


4

English vs Japanese causative English: I made him eat worms. Japanese: 私が彼に虫を食べさせた。 In other words: A makes B do V Vobj = A が B に Vobj を V させる The important part is that, in causative structure, what を attaches to is the object of the action, but not the causee (who is enforced). The causee is marked by に. Thus, the given passage should be ...


4

「[私]{わたし}は[警察官]{けいさつかん}に[犬]{いぬ}にひったくりを[噛]{か}ませて[欲]{ほ}しい。」 is correct if I have to choose between "correct" and "incorrect". A little more natural-sounding word order IMHO would be: 「私は警察官に、ひったくりを犬に噛ませて欲しい。」 for clarity reasons. Cramming the phrase 「AにBに」 into the same part of a sentence is not such a great idea even though it is still ...


3

Causative form can be used without explicit "causee" as long as it can be inferred from the context. In this sentence, the implicit "causee" is the first attack (一撃目). (一撃目を)カカト落としに連携させる to make it (=the first attack) chain to an axe kick I used chain because this kind of 連携 sounds like fighting gamer's jargon to me.


3

I do not know what “causative verb” means in your book, but judging from the 落ちさせる example, I assume that it means verbs with -せる/させる suffix such as 遊ばせる and 片付けさせる. (使役動詞 in Japanese usually means a different form: it means verbs such as 落ちさす, 遊ばす, and 片付けさす.) Then you can just use them in the imperative form with -て. A child may say to their parents: ...


3

More detail about how the causative and passive suffixes evolved. The causative (-a)せる arose from just plain old す (su), itself the origin of the ubiquitous modern verb する (suru, "to do"). The original meaning was "to do [something]; to make XX do [something]" -- i.e., this served as a causativizing or transitivizing suffix. Meanwhile, the passive (-a)れる ...


3

As I think you already understand, 聞かせる is causative form (使役)of 聞く, 聞かされる is the passive-causative form(使役受け身). Passive is often referred to as the "suffering" tense. The subject, the writer, is "suffering" from being made to either ask or listen. If the verb clause is ~たら and the action takes place in the past then the following expression cannot ...


3

食べる "to eat (something)" (active voice) 食べられる "to be eaten (by someone)" (passive voice) 食べさせる "to make/let (someone) eat (something)" (active voice, causative) As you might know, the passive voice can sometimes express a feeling of unhappiness towards the result of the action (that is done against one's will). In this case, the one doing the action of ...


3

あの状況にはうんざりする Yes it sounds correct. あの状況にはうんざりさせる ? No, because it literally sounds like YOU are feeding up something (it should be you who are fed up). "させる" is let someone do something, generally. So you can say instead あの状況にはうんざりさせられる as you mentioned.


3

持ってくる means to bring something with you (hold/carry than come) so the 3rd line is something like "...and had them bring it back (to class)"


3

First of all, as I posted in the comment, 純化 is a suru-verb meaning to purify, and 純化にする doesn't make much sense. We never need に there. I believe this sentence should have been: [A] 人間の生き方をより純化したものが聖杯戦争という殺し合いだ。 Second, X + を + [te-form of verb] + た/だ + もの can mean "the product made by ~ing X", "the result from ~ing X", etc. (eg, ...


2

Is the second form a contraction of the first? Yes. 行かされる is a contraction of 行かせられる. (That said, I'm not sure how this came about etymologically.) Can all 五段 verbs follow this pattern? For example, could 読ませられる be replaced with 読まされる? Yes. All 五段 verbs may follow this pattern. Thus, 読まされる may be used as the causative passive form of 読む. If ...


2

The correct one is 幸せにする, because する is usually the causative form of なる/である. But it seems that when the object is a person, させる is often used instead of する as a light verb. うれしくさせたい つらい思いをさせないで 幸せな気持ちにさせる する, なる, である, etc. are used in the active sense. 好きにしろ つらい思いをする 幸せな気持ちになりたい So it is understandable that some people may say 幸せにさせる unconsciously.


2

X (doer)-は/が + Y (place)-で\に + Z (causer)-に + W (direct object)-を + Causative-Passive Verb (transitive verb) I am not 100% sure but if you mean something like: 山田さんはその教室で佐藤先生に宿題をさせられた。 (Yamada-san was made to do her homework by Sato-sensei in that classroom.) 太郎君はカラオケボックスで次郎君に演歌を歌わされた。 (Taro-kun was made to sing Enka by Jiro-kun at a ...


1

A. 誰{だれ}にも遠{とお}野{の}くんは傷{きず}つけさせません。 B. 貴方{あなた}は他{ほか}の誰{だれ}にも傷{きず}つけさせません。 The plain forms of these sentences are as below. A'. 誰{だれ}にも遠{とお}野{の}くんを傷{きず}つけさせません。   B'. 貴方{あなた}を他{ほか}の誰{だれ}にも傷{きず}つけさせません。 When you add the particle は to を, を is almost always omitted, only は is spoken or written. In old Japanese, をば was used in the case, you may ...



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