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18

ちょっといいですか is a casual expression. Depending on the relation between you and your boss, you may not want to use the phrase to your boss. One of the formal and polite expressions is お時間をいただいてもよろしいですか (おじかんをいただいてもよろしいですか). If you want to state an estimate of the length (say five minutes), you can say something like 五分ほどお時間をいただいてもよろしいですか. お時間をいただく literally ...


14

I'd describe it best as a greeting or set phrase used after (any sort of) work has been done. It can be used in a variety of situations: at the end of any shared activity (before leaving home from work, after volunteer work, after group activities like hiking), very much in the sense of "See you..." when greeting somebody who (supposedly) is working or has ...


13

Mentioning the call you'd received is the most common way, just like you already do. In a business situation, 先程 would be more appropriate than さっき: 先程お電話頂いたBですが... This is B, I believe you called me earlier... By adding そう, you can hint that someone else picked up the phone for you: 先程お電話を頂いたそうですが... I was informed that you called me earlier... ...


13

Not a bona fide answer, in that I am not confident enough to provide you with a reliable example of what you should be saying, but I can definitely tell you how you should not be saying it (despite some suggestions in the comments to your question): Any sentence that starts by a word expressing disagreement. Anything that hints at an actual error made by ...


12

Yes, renewal (of a computer system/hardware/software) can be 更新. For example, the Tokyo Stock Exchange (TSE) renewed their system in Jan. 2010, and the heading on the website of the news agency Kyodo News was: 東証、4日に新システム稼働 10年ぶり更新 (とうしょう、よっかにしんシステムかどう じゅうねんぶりこうしん) TSE to start a new system on (Jan.) 4th; the first renewal in ten years Another ...


12

かしこまりました is by far the most formal, and is a humble form (謙遜語). It says that you are inferior to the listener. Most specifically this should be used to interface with customers (hence why wait staff at a restaurant may say it). 承知しました is polite (〜します), but not humble. It is also appropriate to use with customers or superiors. 了解です is also polite in ...


12

Note that you shouldn't be using ご here because you are doing the 確認, not the other person. Never use ご確認 for something that you will be doing. However, you can use ご for 連絡、報告, etc. when directing the action towards someone else. For your example though, I might say: いつもお世話になっております。 XXの書類、本日確かに受領いたしました。 内容を確認後、改めてご連絡いたします。 よろしくお願いいたします。 Also, ...


11

You have to read the last sentence in the next paragraph to get your specific answer. I borrowed a good letter example from a site with a lot of business templates. First of all, you have to say the addressee's name, career, and you have to say "Sama", and it should be delimited with line breaks and followed by two line breaks (Or maybe carriage returns. ...


11

I am a software engineer. If we will add a few new features or fix bugs, we use エックスワイゼッド改修プロジェクト エックスワイゼッドプロジェクト第2フェーズ など If we will only update data, we use エックスワイゼッド更新プロジェクト エックスワイゼッドデータ更新プロジェクト など 「システム更新/システムを更新する」has a nuance replacing the whole system. Personally, I think「改善プロジェクト」is used for some projects other than ...


11

Your question is "is there a scenario when finishing with [] would be considered out of place or context?". As you noted, 宜しくお願い is similar to "Cheers" or "Regards", but the main difference is that neither of the latter are calls to action, whereas the former has more of a feeling of asking something. Accordingly, among coworkers, it's fine to use when ...


10

In my 故事ことわざ辞典、「木を見て森を見ず」 is from English phrase "You cannot see the woods for the trees". And regarding plural form, 「木」 can mean many trees in Japanese, since Japanese grammar does not always have plural form. And also In 国語辞典、explanation of 「木を見て森を見ず」 is 一本一本の木に目を奪われて全体の森を見ない意から using 一本一本の木, which means each tree instead of 一本の木 (one tree). ...


10

For my money, 「はい、どうも」 just can't be beat. What's that? Too informal, you say? Far from it, my good man. 「はい、どうも」 isn't a replacement for よろしく or 宜しくお願いします when you're winding down the conversation. But there's always that awkwardness that sets in - happens in English, too - when you and the person on the other end are saying conversation-ending-phrases ...


10

I would say the expression お世話になりました is spot on. Especially since you are trying to express gratitude for guidance, which is contained in the word 世話 "looking after; help; aid; assistance". Moreover, お世話になりました is formal and certainly suitable for a corporate environment. To adapt it to your situation, you could say, e.g. 長い間お世話になりました。


9

代表取締役 (formal) or 社長 (informal) or 経営最高責任者 (translated from English) Chief Executive Officer 副社長 Vice President 専務 Senior Managing Director or Executive Director 常務 Managing Director 取締役 Member of the Board or Director 非常勤役員 Outside Director 本部長 General Manager 本部長代理 Acting General Manager 部長 Department Manager 次長 Associate Department Manager 副部長 Associate ...


8

I won't say お先に失礼します is completely out of place, but you should at least mention why you're leaving, so as to assure that you're not offended or anything: すみません、片付けたい仕事がありますので、先に失礼します。 Abruptly announcing お先に失礼します is probably too closely tied to the idiomatic usage (when leaving work). 先に戻ります or 先に行きます can also work as a substitution for 先に失礼します. ...


8

I just want to add one point to other nice answers: 了解です is not a proper polite form for this meaning. The proper polite form is 了解しました. Saying 了解です instead of 了解しました is acceptable and many young people use it but decreases the formality level. It shows an attempt to be polite, but at least if it is used by an educated native speaker of Japanese, it may ...


7

I've found answering the phone at work follows a fairly fixed pattern. I would answer the phone with something along the lines of: 株式会社ZのYYと申{もう}します。 This is company Z, MR Y speaking. or just with the company name. 株式会社Zでございます。 This is company Z. After they introduce themselves and said their "お世話になっております". You generally reply with something ...


7

Generally in Japanese you write 「XXX取扱」to indicate you request special or sensitive handling of the materials in question. There are some variations you could use. Here are a couple I know / looked up with approximate English equivalents. 秘密情報取扱 (ひみつじょうほうとりあつかい) - [Handle as] secret or private information 機密情報取扱 (きみつじょうほうとりあつかい) - [Handle as] confidential ...


7

Regarding formal use: It is a widely-held misconception (even among some young Japanese when they start working in a company) that you should use お疲れさま when leaving the office. Strictly speaking, this is incorrect. お疲れさま[です/でした] is something you say to people leaving, or when you and the other person are both leaving (e.g. when you meet a colleague at ...


6

かしこまる/承知する are used mostly for answering requests from superiours (bosses, clients, etc.). Like, "Yes, I understand what you're asking me to do (and I'll do it)." 分かる just implies you mentally understand. 了解 is not formal as far as I know, and I hear it quite often. I learned it to mean almost like "Roger!" or "copy that".


6

A phrase that hasn't been mentioned and may prove very useful would be とんでもないです。 とんでもないことでございます。 It's a polite way of saying "not at all". I think どういたしまして is polite, but somehow carries too much the nuance of "You're welcome" in that it accepts the fact that whoever is thanking you is correct in thanking you. とんでもない rejects the very idea of ...


6

申し伝えます is used when you are telling a customer, your boss or someone else above you (目上の人) that you will let your coworker know about something. Does it depend on Tanaka's position relative to me? Yes, if (s)he is of the same or lower rank then you, then 申し伝えます is correct, if (s)he is of higher rank than you, than 申し上げる would be correct. However, as ...


5

I usually say something like "あ、すみません、あのう…少し用事があるのですが…". When I get visual acknowledgement, I stand up, bow and go away saying, "あ、では、失礼します。"


5

打合せ is more generic. When you go abroad to meet your boss, your colleagues or customers, you'd say 打合せ. I use ミーティング for when I need to discuss a point with someone. If you're a student and discuss with you advisor once a week, that's it. 会議 is defined as "there's a boring speaker, and everyone around is sleeping" :) That's in fact a conference (even a ...


5

Using ~から like 1万円からお預かりします, which seems to be grammatically incorrect.


5

You are right that they have similar meanings, but I think the connotations are different. 指摘 is very neutral; you are simply pointing out a fact, not making a value judgement. 突っ込む, on the other hand, has more of a connotation of pouncing on a weakness, especially one the other person was hoping would pass unnoticed. So you can point out a flaw in ...


5

It is common for Japanese people to return a thank you rather than accepting the thank you for themselves and saying 'you're welcome'. Aさん: 「〇〇いただき、ありがとうございました。」 Bさん: 「いえいえ、こちらこそありがとうございました。」



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