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6

馬鹿 is an ateji, which means either the readings of the individual kanji do not match the reading of the word, or the meanings of the individual kanji do not match the meaning of the word. In this case, it's the latter - why would an idiot be described as a horse and/or a deer? As for why these particular kanji were chosen to represent ばか, the etymology is ...


3

馬鹿 is also written as 莫迦. Based on 岩波書店’s 広辞苑, it was originally a Buddhist terminology derived from Sanskrit, either “moka –phonetically transcribed as 慕何 in Kanji” meaning ‘stupidity,’ or “mahaliaka – phonetically transcribed as 魔訶羅 meaning ‘ignorance’ - the source: 文明節用集 – Bunmei Glossary published in 文明6年(1474 ). The letter of 馬 is read and vocalized as ...


2

Translating is always a challenge. More so when typographical conventions like this aren't shared between the source and target languages. If you're translating for an audience that is expected to know about the Japanese language and its writing conventions, you might try adding a [ruby]{annotation} to the word(s) in question. Alternatively, you could add ...


2

Why did they choose exactly these kanji characters for spelling these countries' names? It's hard to tell exactly why, because these are mixture of various transliterations done by Japanese and Chinese (of course different between Mandarin or Cantonese or other dialects) speakers that happened to hear the sound for the first time. For example, there ...


2

General phonetic "rules" For a lot of words that are now written using Katakana, there was a tiny amount of logic to it. 亜 transcribed ア virtually exclusively, 伊 is a very common kanji for transcribing イ, 加 for カ, 利 for リ, and generally the kanji from which Katakana come is a good rule, though far from perfect (as noted with ア, and in タ which is usually ...


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同い年 is the sound change of 同じ年(same age). And 同い年 is often used as 同じ学年(same grade in school).



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