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8

First, 無茶 wouldn't be interpreted as bad tea. 無 means "no" as in "nothingness," not bad. As such, one might be led to believe that this is something about not having any tea to give to guests or something, and that situation being where the term came from. This is not true. The kanji 無茶 are ateji. This means that the kanji were chosen arbitrarily based on ...


6

The act of assigning kanjis to words that ignore kanji's meaning is called 当て字 (ateji), and that has a long history. According to Wikipedia article on 当て字, this was very common in the past because the language used to rely on Kanji/Hiragana boundary to help distinguish nouns, verbs, etc from particles. The article is full of great examples like 珈琲, 滅茶苦茶, and ...


4

Etymology There are numerous theories about this. Japanese: The theories restricted to Japanese origins all revolve around the ideas of some larger geographic area that was split into "upper" (-kami or -gami) and "lower" (-shimo) halves. The main theories listed at the JA Wikipedia article on 武蔵国 (Musashi no Kuni) and at the Nihon Jiten page here ...


4

百足 is an ancient Chinese colloquial name for a sort of arthropod. It can be traced to the 6th century document Book of Wei, which includes the passage 百足之蟲,至死不僵,以扶之者眾也 -> "A worm with a hundred feet does not go stiff upon death, since it has many support". The phrase has since found its way into common Chinese idiom in a slightly altered form. The term 百足 ...


4

Not being of Chinese origin does not necessarily imply being ateji (in the sense of only borrowing a kanji's sound with no or hardly any respect to its meaning). 文化、文明、民族、思想 are (according to the Japanese wikipedia) 和製漢語 as well, but do they qualify as ateji? Also 大根 (広辞苑). Conversely, there are words of Chinese origin where each character is used for its ...


3

I'm just basically going to summarize the references from user3169. Until now I've never known that フケ can be written as 雲脂/頭垢. I don't think either form is common in ordinary use of the language, as it is normally written in Katakana. But at the same time they are clearly recognized well enough to be on Wikipedia. According to 語源由来辞典, 雲脂 is 当て字 that most ...


2

[世話]{せわ} is a [和製漢語]{わせいかんご}, a Japan-made, Chinese-looking word. It does not exist in Chinese even though it is an on-reading word. Thus, the kanji combination「世話」is only an ateji.


1

http://www.geocities.jp/holmyow/mukade.html This document seems saying the use of 百足 is at least as old as in the 10th century. So if this research is correct, it shouldn't be considered as a calque from the western languages. (But I'm not sure about the reliability of this document.)



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